£25,000 of Heathrow airport “Community Fund” – much of it from passengers’ spare change – for local flood victims

Heathrow airport has a “Community Fund” which makes donations to community projects local to the airport, in Ealing , Hillingdon , Hounslow , Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead. They say they focus on projects linked to education and youth development, the environment and employment/skills development. In 2014 around £500,000 will be available through 3 distinct grant programmes.They have now announced that they are donating £25,000 for flood-stricken community groups in surrounding boroughs of the airport, to help them recover from the damage caused by the storms and flooding. Some areas only 3 – 4 miles from Heathrow have been badly flooded to a depth of many feet.   The Heathrow Community Fund donations will be made towards those with no help available from insurance or statutory funding.  The funds come from 3 sources – fines imposed on aircraft that breach noise limits, an annual donation from Heathrow and spare change from airport passengers. The noise fines are only for departing, not arriving planes, and this source of funds is used only for the “Communities for Tomorrow” activities. 
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Heathrow’s funding pot to help storm damage recovery

28 Feb 2014  (Get West London)

£25,000 funding available for flood-stricken community groups in surrounding boroughs of the airport
A huge grant has been set aside to help flood-stricken community groups in the surrounding boroughs of Heathrow to recover from the damage caused by the storms.

The airport’s £25,000 cash injection will be offered to assist voluntary organisations such as a local community hall or youth group to replace IT equipment, renovate flooded gardens or allotments, or provide new furniture lost to the storms.

The Heathrow Community Fund donations will be made towards those with no help available from insurance or statutory funding.

It is available to those in Ealing , Hillingdon , Hounslow , Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Caroline Nicholls, fund director said: “Heathrow Community Fund has helped many local community groups with grants, donating £500,000 last year alone.

“We’re now concerned that so much of their good work will be destroyed by the floods.

“When the waters have subsided and these groups are counting the cost of the damage, Heathrow Community Fund may be able to help with a donation towards the expense.”

The funds come from three sources – fines imposed on aircraft that breach noise limits, an annual donation from Heathrow and spare change from airport passengers.  [The Heathrow website about the fund at http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund/communities-together only mentions the donated change, not the noise].

Apply through the Communities Together grant stream by filling out an application form at www.heathrow.com/communityfund

Applicants will need to supply evidence of loss and quotes for the cost of replacement.

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/heathrows-funding-pot-help-storm-6758649


 

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Fears in Heathrow area that a 3rd runway with associated infrastructure could add to local flood risk

11.2.2014

The western end of Heathrow is within 3 miles of the River Thames. The western end of the airport is within 3 – 4 miles of Datchet, Old Windsor and Wraysbury, as well as Staines. These areas are currently experiencing unprecedented flooding, due to some of the wettest weather and more continuous storms and rainfall for several hundred years (which is consistent with predictions of climate change from rising global CO2 emissions). Heathrow airport itself covers a huge area in impermeable surfaces, and its storm drainage is on a vast scale. There were already fears from previous years of its impact on the drainage of  the area. It has the River Colne running along its western edge, and the River Crane along its eastern edge.  A report in 2003 for Hacan recommended that a full EIA should be carried out on the impact of a 3rd runway on the Heathrow flood plain; and that as expansion of Heathrow would have a significant impact on water levels in an area much wider than just the Heathrow flood plain a detailed analysis is carried out in the impact a 3rd runway would have on rivers across a wider area. In addition  that no decision should be made on a 3rd runway until full analysis has been done and has been put out to wide public consultation.http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=19851
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‘Noisy’ Heathrow Airport pays out nearly £600k to good causes

 

Heathrow has paid out £590,000 to groups in Hounslow, Ealing and Hillingdon, thanks in part to planes breaching noise limits

Plane flying over a house near Heathrow

The Heathrow Community Fund handed out £121,857 worth of grants to community projects across Hounslow borough during 2013.

The biggest single donation was £25,000 for the four-week Urban Ambush festival at the Watermans Art Centre, in Brentford, last summer.

A record £590,000 from the fund was shared between nine boroughs surrounding the airport, including Ealing and Hillingdon. The money came from a mixture of fines on airlines for breaching noise limits, a contribution from Heathrow Airport and donations from passengers using the airport.

Nearly 200 young people from Hounslow, Ealing and Hillingdon, many from disadvantaged backgrounds, worked with professional artists as part of Urban Ambush.

Jan Lennox, who helped run the festival, said: “The grant of £25,000 from Heathrow Community Fund was central to providing the range of activities that made the project such a great success.”

Caroline Nicholls, director of the fund, said: “This has been a record year both in terms of the number of grants we’ve awarded and the level of funds we’ve been able to donate to so many excellent community projects. It’s a privilege to be able to see at first hand the inspiring work done by dedicated local volunteers and community organisations.”

Charities in Hounslow and surrounding areas have been urged to apply for grants available this year. For more information about the scheme and how to apply, visit www.heathrow.com/communityfund.

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/noisy-heathrow-airport-pays-out-6642757

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http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund

Heathrow Community Fund

Heathrow Community Fund, run under the guidance of The Communities Trust, makes donations to community projects local to the airport.

Our focus is on projects linked to education and youth development, the environment and employment/skills development.

We also support volunteering and fundraising by airport staff.

In 2014 around £500,000 will be available through three distinct grant programmes.

Communities For Youth

Grants of up to £25,000 to support young people in their development in both education and skills development.

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Slough and Spelthorne.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities for Youth grant

Communities for Tomorrow

Grants of up to £25,000 for projects that help protect the environment or encourage sustainable development and eco education. The programme is funded by aircraft noise fines. [Only this one??]

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities for Tomorrow grant

Communities Together

Grants of up to £2,500 for a wider range of smaller community focused projects. This programme is funded in part by donations from passengers at Heathrow Airport.

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities Together grant

Further information about the Heathrow Community Fund

We do not as a rule support general running costs, including staff costs, preferring to fund, part fund or make a grant towards specific projects. We will not provide funds for commercial sponsorship, to individuals, for third party advertising or political campaigning.

Heathrow Community Fund Trustees meet up to four times a year to consider grant applications.

If you would like more guidance on a potential grant application please drop an email with a summary of your proposal to Kate Birch at community_fund@heathrow.com

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Heathrow airport’s website also says:

Support for charity

Charity partnership

We’ve joined forces with Oxfam to help transform lives worldwide. Our three-year partnership, which started in April 2013, will give us the chance to develop really exciting opportunities for our staff and passengers to help raise vital funds for Oxfam.

We’ve chosen a high-profile partner whose work has a truly global reach to complement our standing as the UK’s only international hub airport. The charity has over 70 years’ experience in fighting poverty globally – from life-saving response in emergencies to life-changing projects and campaigning for lasting change worldwide.

Last year Oxfam’s projects helped an amazing 15 million people in 94 countries. From accessing vital clean water, to ensuring children get to school, and giving farmers the support they need to provide for their families, Oxfam makes a big difference around the world. And that includes the UK. Oxfam works in some of the poorest parts of the country, helping around 10,000 people who don’t have enough to live on.

Our target is to raise £150,000 each year for Oxfam through staff fundraising activities and passenger collections.  [ie. none of that money comes from the airport itself !]  Email community_relations@heathrow.com or call 020 8745 5791 to find out more about Heathrow’s charitable initiatives.

http://www.heathrowairport.com/about-us/community-and-environment/community/support-for-charity

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Noise limits

Departure noise limits

Fixed noise monitors at the airport are located at approximately 6.5km from start-of-roll. This encourages aircraft operators to gain height and then reduce engine power and noise as soon as possible.

There are 12 fixed monitors around Heathrow. The location of the monitors takes account of the noise preferential routes and was decided in the early 1990s following consultation.

There are noise limits applied at these fixed noise monitors for departing aircraft.

These are:

Night quota period 11:30pm – 6am 87 dBA Lmax
Shoulder periods 11pm – 11:30pm,
6am – 7am
89 dBA Lmax
Daytime period 7am – 11pm 94 dBA Lmax

We fine airlines whose aircraft breach the noise limits. The money raised is donated to local community projects through the Noise Fines Fund.

Arrivals noise limits

There are no arrivals noise limits. In light of the findings of a report published in 1999, the then Aviation Minister decided against imposing operational noise limits for arriving aircraft.  Heathrow was, however, involved in the production of the Arrivals Code of Practice. For more information, see our arrivals factsheet.

http://www.heathrowairport.com/noise/what-we-do-about-it/measures-already-in-place/noise-limits

 

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There is some information on the level of charges for planes during the day or night  period, and in different noise Chapter categories.  Page 27 of   http://www.heathrowairport.com/static/HeathrowAboutUs/Downloads/PDF/heathrow-conditions-of-use-2014.pdf

 

The charges are around £7,800 for a Chapter 3 (noisier) plane in the daytime, and £19,500 for the same plane at night.

And around £780 for a Chapter 4 Minus 1  plane in the daytime, and £1,950 for the same plane at night.

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