Queen’s Speech section on climate says an ambitious global deal has widespread support and is strongly in the UK’s interest

In the Queen’s Speech she said: “My Government will seek effective global collaboration to sustain economic recovery and to combat climate change, including at the climate change conference in Paris later this year.”  The government’s briefing on the Speech said: “The Government is seeking to address climate change through ambitious action at home and at the international level. We are hoping to agree an ambitious global deal on international climate change in Paris this year to take effect from 2020.” Some extracts from the briefing include: “A [global] deal is strongly in the UK’s interest.”… “It’s not just governments who want this deal. There is widespread support from business, NGOs and the wider public both in the UK here and internationally.” …”The UK has taken decisive domestic action through the Climate Change Act and has already reduced its emissions by 30% as part of its commitment to an 80% reduction in emissions by 2050 from 1990 levels. This target is in line with the global objective to keep temperature increase below 2 degrees.” …”The UK has set targets in legislation, 5 year carbon budgets and review mechanisms, which is providing a leading model for climate change policies both domestically and at the international level.”
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27 May 2015

Paris Conference

Quote from the Queen’s Speech:

“My Government will seek effective global collaboration to sustain economic recovery and to combat climate change, including at the climate change conference in Paris later this year.”

The Government is seeking to address climate change through ambitious action at
home and at the international level. We are hoping to agree an ambitious global deal
on international climate change in Paris this year to take effect from 2020. A global
deal is the only way we can deliver the scale of action required. The most cost effective
and competitive way to achieve this is an international, legally binding, rules
based agreement covering every country. We are negotiating this under the UN
Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), covering over 190 countries.

A deal is strongly in the UK’s interest.

• A global climate agreement is the only way to deliver the global response
necessary.

• The UK is a world leader in green technology and innovation, and a global
commitment on climate change will open our new opportunities for our lowcarbon
industries

• In addition to the science and sustainability arguments, there is a compelling
case to avert direct threats to the UK such as severe weather events from
floods to heatwaves that can wreak economic and social damage; and indirect
threats through global changes such as rising costs and regional instability.

• Global impacts also underpin the need to support developing countries to
improve economic stability and growth, and move to a low carbon, climate
resilient growth path.

• A global climate agreement is vital to deliver the global response needed to
mobilise the necessary finance to invest in adaption and mitigation across the
world.

• It’s not just governments who want this deal. There is widespread support
from business, NGOs and the wider public both in the UK here and
internationally.

There are a number of negotiating sessions and events in the lead up to Paris,
including the UNFCCC Intersessional in Bonn in June, which will be an important
opportunity to discuss elements of the deal such as countries’ intended contributions
and rules regarding transparency and accountability.

The UK has taken decisive domestic action through the Climate Change Act and has
already reduced its emissions by 30% as part of its commitment to an 80% reduction
in emissions by 2050 from 1990 levels. This target is in line with the global objective
to keep temperature increase below 2 degrees.

The UK has set targets in legislation, 5 year carbon budgets and review
mechanisms, which is providing a leading model for climate change policies both
domestically and at the international level.

Written by:

Media Team, Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), 3 Whitehall Place, London SW1A 2AW    030 0068 5476

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section copied from the Briefing Pack from the Government, on the Queen’s Speech.  27.5.2015

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/430029/queens-speech-briefing-pack.pdf

 

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Carbon budgets

The Climate Change Act is something of which the UK is proud. As are the  5 year carbon budgets. They would be even better if they fully included the carbon emitted by international aviation and shipping, which currently just have to be taken into account – rather than fully included. Talks will take place over the next year about their full inclusion in the 5th carbon budget, to be set in 2016..

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Government fails to properly include international aviation in UK carbon budgets – decision put off till 2016

The government was legally required to make a statement to Parliament by the end of December on whether it will include CO2 emissions from international aviation and shipping (IAS) in the UK’s climate target under the Climate Change Act. Today Ed Davey went against the advice from the Committee on Climate Change, and postponed the decision, using some ambiguous wording. His exact words were that the government “is deferring a firm decision on whether to include international aviation and shipping emissions within the UK’s net carbon account” and that it “will revisit this issue when setting the fifth Carbon Budget (2028 – 2032).” ie. in 2016, which is after the next general election. IAS will continue to be excluded from the first 4 carbon budgets, which run until 2027. The Chancellor and many Conservatives are reluctant to do anything that can be seen as strengthening environmental regulations. If the greenhouse gases from IAS were included in the UK targets, other sectors, including electricity generation and industry, would have to make steeper cuts in their emissions. Government justifies its postponement by arguing that there is uncertainty about the EU ETS at present, and also whether there just might be progress on a global aviation carbon scheme through ICAO in 2013. 

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2012/12/carbon_budgets/

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