Teddington Action Group find evidence of slower rates of climb of large planes from Heathrow

The Teddington Action Group, formed by communities in the area affected by the noise of Heathrow take-offs towards the east, have been suffering from planes that climb particularly slowly.  TAG have done research to show that many planes taking off from Heathrow have some of the lowest lowest climbing rates of any airport in the world. (For example, at 12km from “start of roll,” an A380 at 2,200 feet, while at Dubai at 3,900 feet. Or a 777 at 1,600 ft at Heathrow and 3,100 feet at Chicago). The result is more noise from those under Heathrow flight paths. There are required minimum rates of take-off set out in the Heathrow Airport (Noise Abatement Requirements) Notice 2010. The requirements are that planes climb to 1,000 feet by 6.5 kilometres from the “start of roll”. Once they reach 6.5 kilometres from start of roll, planes are required to climb at a rate of not less than 4% or 1 in 25. But these rates of climb are so low and out of date that even a World War II Lancaster Bomber fully loaded could make that. TAG wants the regulations to be changed so that all aircraft must attain at least 2,500’ [up from 1,000’] by 6.5 kilometres from start of roll; and that thereafter all aircraft must keep climbing at a rate of at least 12% [up from 4%] until 6,000’ [up from 4,000’]
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Teddington TAG ask:  Are Low Flying Planes at Heathrow Causing Us Harm?

http://www.teddingtonactiongroup.com/  10 page report – below is just the first section ….

4.4.2016 (Teddington Action Group)
The answer is a resounding YES!

Planes using Heathrow have some of the lowest flying and lowest climbing rates of any airport in the world and as a result cause more noise pollution and more damaging climate changing gases than are necessary. Complaints have soared by over 1,500%1 and numerous
protest groups have sprung up. This is nothing to do with “NIMBYism”. The impetus for protest is because Heathrow flight path usage changes have put people in a completely different position than before, without any discussion, compensation or indeed any explanation.

The Aviation Environment Federation (AEF) have described it as “One day, you wake up and overnight bulldozers have turned your road into a motorway with car after car rushing past your house”.

There are required minimum rates of take-off at Heathrow set out in the Heathrow Airport London (Noise Abatement Requirements) Notice 2010. The requirements are that planes climb to 1,000 feet by 6.5 kilometres from the point at which they start their take off run or “start of roll”. Once they reach 6.5 kilometres from start of roll, aeroplanes are required to climb at a rate of not less than 4% or 1 in 25. The trouble is that these rates of climb are so low and out of date that even a World War II Lancaster Bomber fully loaded could make that.

We in the Teddington Action Group have taken details from both WebTrak and Flight Aware. WebTrak is preferred by Heathrow and, following an audit from NLR Netherland Aerospace Centre, is stated to be 99% accurate. However, WebTrak is not available at all airports. We have therefore used both sources. 

According to Flight Aware, Heathrow is right at the bottom of the league table in getting its planes up into the air and on to an altitude that gives residents on the ground an acceptable level of noise. WebTrak shows measurements as aircraft climb. Taking heights of planes measured through Web Trak ateither 12 kms from start of roll or 9 kms from point of take-off, the results again show Heathrow occupying the bottom position of international airports for rates of climb.

Prior to May 2014, flights of heavier aircraft were much higher. We have recorded various planes at heights substantially greater than after early June 2014. Heathrow conducted its own investigation by a company called PA Knowledge, which concluded that heights of planes on departure had reduced and showed one plane flying recently as low as 1,423’ by Swan Island (TW1 4RP), which is exactly 12 kilometres from start of roll. Even large planes can climb to 4,500’ by that point, making a fraction of the noise on the ground.

…………. and there is a lot more detail at

Are Low Flying Planes causing us harm_longer version TAG April 2016

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See earlier:

Teddington Action Group show – from Heathrow report – that they are now suffering more aircraft noise

Residents in Twickenham and Teddington have been aware of greatly increased aircraft noise from Heathrow, over the past year. However, Heathrow have for months insisted that the noise has not increased. Now an independent report commissioned and paid for by Heathrow, by PA Consulting has shown that the residents are right.  Examining data between November 2011 and May 2015, the report confirms that planes – especially the heavier, noisier types – are flying lower than previously over the area, in greater numbers and concentrated within flight paths. Also that the periods of greatest disruption are increasingly late at night and early in the morning. Rather than being associated with the 2014 Flight Path Trials, which saw record numbers of noise complaints from residents, the report states that these developments merely reflect the general trend of fleet development and air traffic movements. TAG say they have more of the noisiest long haul planes flying over lower than before, sometimes at little more than 2,000 feet in Teddington and 1,400 feet in Twickenham.  Worryingly, if this disruption stems from new flight trends, it is only likely to get worse, and for many other areas overflown by Heathrow planes.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2015/10/teddington-action-group-show-from-heathrow-report-that-they-are-now-suffering-more-aircraft-noise/

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