Tel: 020 7248 2227 RSS FeedRSS feed

Scottish Transport Minister warns Dundee Airport still faces major challenges even with £2.85 million PSO help

The Scottish Transport Minister has said that Dundee Airport still faces a challenge after the £2.85 million funding guaranteeing its future for 2 years was approved.  Councillors agreed the public service obligation (PSO) between Westminster and Dundee City Council, which guarantees the money to keep the Dundee to London (Stansted) air route open. Scottish Transport Minister Keith Brown, while welcoming the deal, said it was only part of securing the long-term future of the airport. Dundee Airport can now start looking forward. The airport faces a challenge in the increasingly competitive aviation market and needs to continue looking at all the available options to encourage more passengers and businesses to use it. They might be able to drum up business from the offshore renewable energy sector.  The PSO funding comes from the new Regional Air Connectivity fund and is the first funding of its kind. 
.

 

Transport Minister warns Dundee Airport still faces major challenges after funding boost

By ANDREW LIDDLE, (The Courier)
10 June 2014
The Scottish Transport Minister has said that Dundee Airport still faces a challenge after multi-million-pound funding guaranteeing its future for two years was approved.

Councillors agreed the public service obligation (PSO) between Westminster and Dundee City Council, which guarantees £2.85 million to keep the Dundee to London air route open for two years.

Transport Minister Keith Brown, while welcoming the deal, said it was only part of securing the long-term future of the airport.

He said: “The announcement of the PSO on the Dundee-Stansted route is a significant and welcome development for Dundee Airport.

“As we outlined in the Dundee Airport Scoping Study, published last December, securing the future of this crucial air link was one of our top priorities.

“Transport Scotland worked in partnership with Dundee City Council and Highlands and Islands Airports Limited to keep the route going in the short term and help the council build its PSO case.

“With the council agreeing the PSO last night, Dundee Airport can now start looking forward.

“It faces a challenge in the increasingly competitive aviation market and while this route will provide a platform for growth, it’s important we continue looking at all the available options to encourage more passengers and businesses to use it.

“The scoping study also highlighted a number of commercial opportunities — like engaging with companies in the offshore renewables sector — which could give Dundee Airport a unique place in Scotland’s aviation industry.

“These are areas that could be developed to attract new business.

“The establishment of the PSO is the first step for Dundee Airport, and the Scottish Government remains committed to working with Highlands and Islands Airport Limited, Dundee City Council and other stakeholders to secure its future,” he added.

SNP administration leader Ken Guild has hailed the deal as “great news for Dundee”.

http://www.thecourier.co.uk/news/local/dundee/transport-minister-warns-dundee-airport-still-faces-major-challenges-after-funding-boost-1.414121

.

.


 

.

Earlier:

DfT signs first public service obligation to protect Dundee Airport to Stansted route

Air links between Dundee and London have been secured for the next 2 years with funding put in place today by the UK government. The public service obligation (PSO) agreed between the UK government and Dundee City Council guarantees £2.85 million to keep the route open, with flight times between the 2 airports at around 90 minutes. The funding comes from the new Regional Air Connectivity fund announced by Danny Alexander at Spending Round 13. This is the first funding of its kind. Robert Goodwill, UK Aviation Minister said: “Regional airports have a key role to play in our long term economic plan for the nation’s future prosperity, and the government is committed to ensuring they have access to London and vice versa.” The Regional Air Connectivity fund can be used to maintain important regional air connections, where they are in danger of being lost. The government doubled the size of the fund to £20 million per year in the 2014 Budget. The government aims to set up a second PSO agreement for the Newquay-London air link later this year, for business and tourism.

Click here to view full story…

.

.

.

Read more »

Gatwick’s head of corporate affairs and lobbying, James Colman, leaving – no successor yet

James Colman joined Gatwick in April 2012 as their chief lobbyist, to promote their second runway bid. He is now leaving. His title was Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Director. Previously he was at British Gas where he was Head of Communications. The airport website blurb says of him: “He has a wealth of corporate communications experience, including 14 years working with blue-chip companies (eg John Lewis Partnership and PepsiCo.) and organisations across the UK, Europe and globally, mainly in the FMCG, retail and energy sectors. The Telegraph’s City Diary says he is “credited with playing a “key role” in getting the Gatwick bid off the ground” …. and he “has packed his bags for an – as yet unnamed – new destination.” Mr Colman’s successor has not yet been found, but a Gatwick spokesman said the recruitment process is “under way”.  In February 2013 Gatwick brought in Fishburn Hedges and the London Communications Agency (LCA) on an integrated PR and public affairs brief, as part of its second runway lobbying.

.

City Diary: Gatwick without a pilot in airports expansion battle

James Colman, the chief lobbyist credited with getting Gatwick’s second runway bid off the ground, has packed his bags.

The battle of the runways between Gatwick and Heathrow has just swung in Heathrow’s favour.

Just weeks after both airports presented their final petitions to build the next runway in the South East of England to the Airports Commission, Diary can reveal that James Colman, the chief lobbyist credited with playing a “key role” in getting the Gatwick bid off the ground, has packed his bags for an – as yet unnamed – new destination.

Mr Colman’s departure after just over two years as Gatwick’s corporate affairs and sustainability director leaves Gatwick’s expansion plans, currently on the Airports Commission’s shortlist of three, without a pilot at a rather critical point.

Mr Colman’s successor has not yet been found, admits a Gatwick spokesman, although the recruitment process is “under way”. “During [Colman’s] time, Gatwick’s campaign for a second runway has come a long way, and we are now widely seen as the only deliverable solution for the UK,” claims the source.

James Colman. Gatwick’s Director of Corporate Affairs and Sustainability.

James Colman to join Gatwick as Corporate Affairs & Sustainability Director

22 February 2012 (Gatwick airport press release)

James Colman to take up post in April 2012

Gatwick Airport announced today that James Colman will be joining the Executive Management team as Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Director, taking up the post in April.

He will lead a team of 22 people spanning media and PR, Public Affairs, Internal Communications, Airport Communications and Corporate Responsibility.

2012 will be a critical year for the Government’s new aviation policy and James will be responsible for positioning Gatwick in the critical debates about the future of UK aviation, as well as continuing to promote Gatwick as London’s airport of choice, emphasising quality of customer service compared with its competitors.

James brings with him a corporate communications background, including 14 years working with blue-chip companies and organisations across the UK, Europe and globally, mainly in the FMCG, retail and energy sectors.

James is currently with British Gas where he is Head of Communications and an Executive Team member for the £3 billion B2B side of the energy company. He was previously with communications consultancy Luther Pendragon working with companies such as John Lewis Partnership and PepsiCo.

Prior to that, for ten years he worked for Sancroft, a leading Corporate Responsibility and Communications consultancy, working for a number of EU and US based multinational companies including Vodafone, Coca-Cola and Tesco.

On his appointment, James Colman said: “Gatwick Airport is setting a new benchmark for what passengers and airlines should expect from a leading airport, with some very exciting plans for the future. That is why I am delighted to be joining Gatwick, and leading its award-winning communications team at such a critical and exciting time.”

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/News/James-Colman-to-join-Gatwick-as-Corporate-Affairs-Sustainability-Director-724.aspx

.

.


.

James Colman, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Director

James joined Gatwick in April 2012 from British Gas where he was Head of Communications. He has a wealth of corporate communications experience, including 14 years working with blue-chip companies and organisations across the UK, Europe and globally, mainly in the FMCG, retail and energy sectors.

Previously, James was with communications consultancy Luther Pendragon working with companies such as John Lewis Partnership and PepsiCo. Prior to that for ten years he worked for Sancroft, a leading corporate responsibility and communications consultancy.

http://www.gatwickairport.com/business-community/about-gatwick/ownership-management/executive-management/

.


Gatwick brings in Fishburn Hedges and LCA to support second runway bid

Gatwick Airport has brought in Fishburn Hedges and the London Communications Agency (LCA) on an integrated PR and public affairs brief, as it looks to gain support for building a controversial second runway.

Gatwick Airport
Gatwick Airport

 

Both agencies will work directly with Gatwick’s comms team, with Fishburn Hedges providing strategic and public affairs support. LCA will work for the airport at a local and regional level as Gatwick engages key stakeholders in London and West Sussex.

Allowing a second runway at Gatwick is just one of several options for airport expansion in South East England, which has been a difficult issue for the Government.

After coming under pressure last year to reverse the Coalition’s commitment not to allow another runway at Heathrow, the Prime Minister set up an Independent Airports Commission, chaired by Sir Howard Davies, to look into options for expansion and report its findings after the 2015 General Election.

Gatwick is currently developing detailed expansion plans that could double the airport’s annual capacity to around 70 million passengers and is to submit its case to the commission over the coming months.

The airport was sold by Heathrow owner BAA in 2009 to a group of international investment funds, of which Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP) is the majority shareholder.

Rival options the commission is expected to decide on include expanding Heathrow or Stanstead and building a new airport in Thames Estuary.

Gatwick’s plans include evaluations of the environmental and economic impacts on the local area, which is likely to be fraught as campaigners have protested that the expansion will harm the environment and raise noise levels. It is legally committed not to build a second runway before 2019.

James Colman, corporate affairs and sustainability director at Gatwick Airport, said: ‘We believe a second runway at Gatwick could present the best long-term solution to the future capacity constraints in the South East.

‘We have the room to grow and our continued investment is proof that we’re putting passengers first. Fishburn Hedges and LCA are proving to be crucial partners for our team as we ensure we make our voice heard in this important debate.

http://www.prweek.com/article/1169601/gatwick-brings-fishburn-hedges-lca-support-second-runway-bid

.

.

.

Read more »

Level playing field on transport costs vital to proper assessment of runway options – says TfL

The issue of surface access to airports was the subject of the RunwaysUK conference on 2nd June. Michèle Dix, planning director of Transport for London, said that the costs for surface access for each of the runway options must be assessed against a level playing field of criteria.  Michèle said it was vital that estimates by runway promoters reflected that actual needs of transport in the capital. “You need to compare like with like. What are the true and full costs of accommodating this additional demand? If airports are placing a greater demand on the network then we need a greater transport provision.” The Thames estuary proposal had not compared the surface access needs, like for like. She estimated that comparable “optimal” investment level of investment needed – the total package of transport schemes required to deliver an optimal level of surface transport access – for Heathrow was £17.6bn, Gatwick £12.4bn and an Inner Thames Estuary airport £19.1bn.  .


 

These are the speaker presentations from the conference

View speaker presentations here.

And other Post-Show resources  


TfL assumptions on transport costs for runway options June 2014

   

One of the slides from Michelle Dix’s presentation:

Michèle Dix, Managing Director of Planning, Transport for London

 

 

Michelle’s presentation is at

Michèle Dix, Managing Director of Planning, Transport for London


One of the slides from Michelle Dix’s presentation:

Potential trip growth on public transport and road

.

Level playing field on transport costs vital to proper assessment of airport runway options.

Antony Oliver (Infrastructure Intelligence) 4 June 2014 Surface access costs for each of the airport development options being scrutinised by Sir Howard Davies Airports Commission (see below) must be assessed against a level playing field of criteria, Transport for London planning director Michele Dix warned this week. Presenting the findings of TfL’s on-going assessment work to inform the Airport Commission as it works towards recommending a preferred airport expansion option for the UK, Dix told delegates to the RunwaysUK Surface Access debate that it was vital that estimates by promoters reflected that actual needs of transport in the capital. “We cannot assume that the schemes that are already committed to will absorb that growth. We have tried to assess what is required for each of the options on the table and find what is the minimal level and the optimal level. “ Michele Dix, Transport for London “We want to make sure that when the Davies Commission makes its decisions we are assessing the options on a similar basis,” she said. “You need to compare like with like. What are the true and full costs of accommodating this additional demand? If airports are placing a greater demand on the network then we need a greater transport provision.” Dix highlighted her concern that the original TfL supported inner estuary option, now being reviewed by the Davies Commission for possible inclusion on the shortlist, had suffered from not comparing the surface access needs like for like. She estimated that comparable “optimal” investment level of investment needed – the total package of transport schemes required to deliver an optimal level of surface transport access – for Heathrow was £17.6bn, Gatwick £12.4bn and an Inner Thames Estuary airport £19.4bn. Similarly she said that the minimum “low” level required would be some £2.1bn at Heathrow, £0.4bn at Gatwick and £2.5bn for an estuary scheme. “TfL put forward the optimal provision for Thames Estuary. But that was being compared with the low provision that was put forward by others in their submissions. We are saying that you have to compare like with like.” Dix highlighted the additional public transport and road traffic burden that any new airport expansion would place on the capital’s transport networks adding that one of the critical factors was that the nature of flight times meant that airports tended to place more passengers load on the public transport at peak hours. “We cannot assume that the schemes that are already committed to will absorb that growth,” she said. “We have tried to assess what is required for each of the options on the table and find what is the minimal level and the optimal level. And then we could compare these with the figures included in each of the proposal schemers and with the objectives set by the Davies commission.” “We are literally playing catch up with our growth,” said Dix pointing out that even without additional airport capacity London was predicted to have to cope with an additional 5M trips on the rail network by 2030 and 10M trips by 2050. “It is a similar story on the road network – and with the growth forecast these things will only get worse.” Airport development “no game changer” in rail development strategy: Network Rail Network Rail strategy and planning director Paul Harwood agreed that meeting the challenge of growth on transport networks was critical but pointed out that the unprecedented growth witnessed on the railways meant that. Regardless of the addition of new airport capacity, “continued significant investment in the railways” was vital. “The three or four new airport proposals are not really game changers,” Paul Harwood, Network Rail “The three or four new airport proposals are not really game changers,” he said referring to their overall impact of growth estimates. “In the morning peak it represents a relative small percentage of usage on the infrastructure. But they do provide a significant amount of demand outside the peak.” “Looking at the surface access requirements of the three shortlisted options you need quite a lot of that investment anyway. It is all going in the same direction,” he said “However, without wishing to be too negative, the hub proposal is a different strategic direction – there is no doubt about it.” We haven’t really worked on the Estuary option. “That probably is a game changer but it is against the direction of travel – there is a busy network that you would have to integrate with so would require a big investment. The upside is that you would then see a high mode shift.” Airport expansion contenders set out their surface access options Speaking at this week’s RunwaysUK Surface Access debate the three Davies Commission shortlisted schemes plus the Inner Thames Estuary scheme set out and discussed their challenges and opportunities over surface access to the airport.

Thames Hub

“We have to look at the whole of the South East capacity not just central London,” said Foster and Partners’ Huw Thomas. “How we grow to the east is our key task. Make no mistake we will have to because that is where people will live.” Thames Hub says: “Surface access is critical and a key component of the airport evolution and the way our economy will develop” Thomas set out a range of surface assess options to a new hub airport on the Isle of Grain including the use of the existing classic railway, new high speed trains and local services. Together these would provide some 17 trains an hour and 11,800 passenger journeys in each direction plus new road, park and ride capacity and freight transport solutions. “Surface access is critical and a key component of the airport evolution and the way our economy will develop,” he said. “If we are thinking 30 to 50 years from now for future generations it is about the way London is going to grow and where future generations will live and where they will want connectivity. It is not about cramming a quart into a pint pot any more but about taking the right decisions about what we do with road and rail and housing and where we put that critical infrastructure.”

Gatwick

Head of Airport development Julia Gregory set out Gatwick’s vision to boost public transport access to the airport from the current 45% of passengers to 60% by the time a second runway was operational in 2021, putting some 15M people within 1 hour of the airport with a tripling of rail capacity. Gatwick says: “Gatwick also serves the regional economy. We have shown that there is room for everyone [commuters and air passengers] to use the railway.” The new “Gatwick Obviously” surface access strategy she said would see a new Gatwick Express service on line by 2016 and the upgraded Thameslink service reach the airport by 2018 which, with trains to London every 2.5 minutes and a connection to 175 railway stations, would provide an unrivalled public transport solution. “We are delivering capacity for the user but also for the UK economy,” she said. “Gatwick also serves the regional economy. We have shown that there is room for everyone [commuters and air passengers] to use the railway.” In addition to the improvement to the hard shoulder running on the M25 and M23, Gatwick has also committed to 100% fund a doubling of capacity at junction 9 of the M23, improving the local road network and provide 9km of new walking and cycle routes or the local population. “We are not looking to introduce a congestion charge as a result of the scheme and we are not looking for public subsidy either,” said Gregory. “Our infrastructure required is planned, committed and funded. Gatwick is the best connected, best for the economy and best for the passenger.”

Heathrow

Simon Earles, Heathrow Airport’s head of surface access strategy said the airport had listened and engaged with its stakeholders so as to develop a surface access strategy that underpinned plans to expand the UK’s premier hub airport. Heathrow says:  “Heathrow is a truly integrated transport hub. We are planning a step change in public transport use and no new airport related traffic.” “Heathrow is critical for trades – for imports and exports. It is the premier port by value in the UK,” said Earles, highlighting that Heathrow is about more than just passenger services. “Our plans include the doubling of capacity for freight.” But passengers are of course a key part of the Heathrow mix and building on the current London Underground lines and Heathrow Express service, Earles said the airports plans included increasing from the current 18 trains an hour into the airport to 40 by 2040. “Rail is critically important to our future,” he said highlighting the “committed and credible plan” to triple the numbers of seats and double the number of trains into the airport. “Heathrow is a truly integrated transport hub. We are planning a step change in public transport use and no new airport related traffic.” Critically the Heathrow plans also include major changes to the M25 access into airport with new exit strategies and a new access route to the central terminal area via the south to relieve pressure on the northern entrance. “A congestion charge is planned to control traffic flows around the Heathrow area – but only if required,” he added.

Heathrow Hub

Airports are only as good as their ground transport links, Heathrow Hub promoter Mark Bostock reminded the Runways UK delegates this week as he set out plans for a step change in access to the UK main hub airport using an innovative northern hub interchange. Heathrow Hub says: “Crucially we are proposing to close junction 14 to increase the separation between the airport junctions and helps safeguard land for future runway extensions.” “Heathrow is in the right place,” he said reiterating the folly of attempting to create a new hub elsewhere. “The surface access solution needs a very integrated approach. The key is bringing the front door of the airport closer to the road and rail network.” The new rail hub would be sited between Paddington and Reading and connect passengers to the airport in five minutes using automated people movers at 90 second intervals thus avoiding the need to create any expensive new direct train connections to the airport from the west to achieve 60% of passengers using public transport. In addition the scheme would see access from the M25 revamped by removing junction 14 and providing greater capacity exits at other junctions. “The critical problem is not capacity but weaving traffic on the M25,” he explained. “Our solution is to use more dispersed access to the airport and it is a solution that I think has been welcomed by the Highways Agency. Crucially we are proposing to close junction 14 to increase the separation between the airport junctions and helps safeguard land for future runway extensions.” http://www.infrastructure-intelligence.com/article/jun-2014/level-playing-field-transport-costs-vital-proper-assessment-airport-runway-options . . Slide from Michele Dix’s presentation. Michèle Dix, Managing Director of Planning, Transport for London True and full costs on surface transport


.

See also

Heathrow and Gatwick set out their rival claims at RunwaysUK conference on airport surface access

The organisation, RunwaysUK, which describes itself as a neutral platform for debate on the rival runway schemes, held an interesting and productive half day conference on surface access to airports. There were accounts by Heathrow, Gatwick, Heathrow Hub and the Thames estuary scheme proposers of their plans for road and rail access, as well as contributions by TfL, Network Rail and others with an interest. It is recognised that adding a runway in the south east would come with immense transport strains on existing transport infrastructure. In order to meet requirements on the amount of passengers (and staff) using the airport to be by public transport, the airports know they cannot depend on road access alone. The pressure of extra passengers on networks that are already stretched, especially at peak times, is recognised – though Gatwick and Heathrow do their best to say their passengers will add little, and merely make rail services more profitable out of peak hours. Vexed issues remain of how much the taxpayer pays for transport services the airports benefit from, and what the cost of added congestion to road and rail services – from millions of extra air passengers being added – would cost the economy.

Click here to view full story…

Read more »

Residents in areas near Luton urged to record the aircraft noise

Residents in the Luton area have held a meeting to voice their concerns following the decision in early May by the Government (Eric Pickles) to not call in the planning application for the expansion for Luton Airport.  The meeting, chaired by Luton and District Association for the Control of Aircraft Noise (LADACAN), was held in Breachwood Green and was attended by about 50 people. They were encouraged to record aircraft noise, to keep details of the current situation, to illustrate the increased impact an extra 55,000 flights a year would have on those living nearby. The expansion application would see passenger capacity rise from 12.5 million to 18 million a year by 2026.  That decision has been widely criticised by local people,and by their MPs who realise it will adversely affect local quality of life for thousands.  It means the expansion can now be granted by Luton Borough Council – which also owns the airport. There is very real and widespread concern about the number of night flights, noise both of departures and arrivals, road congestion, and air quality – as well as climate change implications.
.

 

Residents urged to record Luton Airport noise from aircraft

Luton Airport

Luton Airport

by   ( Local Comet)

June 4, 2014

Residents gathered last week to voice their concerns following the decision by the Government to not call in the planning application for the expansion for Luton Airport.

The meeting, chaired by Luton and District Association for the Control of Aircraft Noise (LADACAN), was held at Breachwood Green Village Hall on Thursday, May 29.

About 50 people attended and were encouraged by LADACAN to record aircraft noise to illustrate the increased impact an extra 55,000 flights a year would have on those living nearby,

Last month Eric Pickles, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, decided not to call in the expansion application – which would also see passenger capacity rise from 12.5 million to 18m a year by 2026.

The decision, which has been widely criticised by Comet country MPs, means the planning application for the expansion can now be granted by Luton Borough Council – which owns the airport.

Speaking about the meeting, Andrew Lambourne from campaign group Hertfordshire Against Luton Expansion (HALE) said: “The meeting gave people the chance to find out where things currently stand with the planning application and raise their concerns. A high level of frustration was expressed that it appears so little can be done to head off the quality-of-life impact of the Luton Airport expansion.”

Some of the issues that were raised were the number of night flights, the level of noise both during departure and arrival, road congestion, air quality and climate change and the general safety risk.

People concerned about aircraft noise or flights are asked to record the details and email noise@ltn.aero

 

http://www.thecomet.net/news/residents_urged_to_record_luton_airport_noise_from_aircraft_1_3629301

.

.


 

.

LADACAN Members’ meeting on Thursday 29th May

LADACAN is holding an informal meeting on Thursday 29th May at 8pm in Breachwood Green Village Hall to discuss the latest developments re Luton Airport expansion (see below), and what options are open to us for further action

 

Government ignores its own policy

The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government has decided not to “call-in” the Airport’s plan for expansion leaving the way clear for Luton Borough Council to grant permission. We have no details of the basis of this decision but it appears that the Government is prepared to let its policy on aircraft noise fall by the wayside on this, its first test since it was approved last year.

LADACAN wrote to the Secretary of State for Transport in January pointing out that the decision does not conform to the policy and that planning applications such as this are his only means of enforcing the policy.

Meanwhile, there appears to be huge confusion over the conditions which the Council wants to apply to the grant of permission: there is a significant danger that LADACAN and the other residents’ groups which oppose the plans will agree with the Airport management that the conditions are not fit for purpose and make little sense.

http://www.ladacan.org/

 

.

 


.

Luton Airport expansion to go ahead

Luton Airport operators LLAOL have announced that Eric Pickles, Secretary of State, has decided not to call in the expansion plans, meaning that Luton Borough Council can now grant planning permission for works designed to achieve a doubling of annual passenger capacity.

The government is clearly hell-bent on expanding airport capacity in the South East, come what may. Regardless of the fact that 70% of the public who responded to the consultation over Luton Airport Expansion said NO, ignoring the fact that aviation is the fastest-growing source of greenhouse gases, and despite the application technically constituting a nationally significant infrastructure project, Eric Pickles has failed to call this application in for proper scrutiny.

The airport’s announcement this morning mentions everything except the key local issues: the effect of an extra 9 million passengers per year on the already crowded transport infrastructure, and the effect of noise from 60% more flights. The throwaway comment at the end about being a good neighbour is meaningless unless the airport takes seriously the concerns about noise and puts in place measures to make a difference. That means a Noise Action Plan which has some real bite, and Planning Conditions which control noise over local communities.

http://www.hale.uk.net/category/news/

.

.

 

Read more »

DfT signs first public service obligation to protect Dundee Airport to Stansted route

Air links between Dundee and London have been secured for the next 2 years with funding put in place today by the UK government. The public service obligation (PSO) agreed between the UK government and Dundee City Council guarantees £2.85 million to keep the route open, with flight times between the 2 airports at around 90 minutes. The funding comes from the new Regional Air Connectivity fund announced by Danny Alexander at Spending Round 13.  This is the first funding of its kind.  Robert Goodwill, UK Aviation Minister said: “Regional airports have a key role to play in our long term economic plan for the nation’s future prosperity, and the government is committed to ensuring they have access to London and vice versa.” The Regional Air Connectivity fund can be used to maintain important regional air connections, where they are in danger of being lost. The government doubled the size of the fund to £20 million per year in the 2014 Budget. The government aims to set up a second PSO agreement for the Newquay-London air link later this year, for business and tourism.
.

 

 

Department for Transport signs first public service obligation to protect Dundee Airport to London Stansted Airport route

Regional airline

6.6.2014 (DfT website)
Air links between Dundee and London have been secured for the next 2 years with funding put in place today (6 June 2014) by the government. The public service obligation (PSO) agreed between the UK government and Dundee City Council guarantees £2.85 million to keep the route open, with flight times between the 2 airports at around an hour and a half.

The funding comes from the new Regional Air Connectivity fund announced by the Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander at Spending Round 13.

LoganAir will operate the route under PSO from 1 July 2014. Two daily flights each way means business people and visitors will continue to be able to visit both destinations for day trips.

Danny Alexander said:

I’m delighted that the Regional Air Connectivity Fund I announced at the Spending Round 13 is delivering for Dundee. Dundee is a key economic hub in Scotland’s thriving economy. This will ensure that its key industries remain connected to rest of the UK. It’s good news for the people of Dundee and shows how we are better off together.

UK Aviation Minister Robert Goodwill said:

This funding from the Regional Air Connectivity fund, the first of its kind, is good news for Dundee and its economy, whether it’s the world class research being carried out the University of Dundee or the city’s financial services sector. Regional airports have a key role to play in our long term economic plan for the nation’s future prosperity, and the government is committed to ensuring they have access to London and vice versa.

Ken Guild, leader of Dundee City Council said:

Flights to and from London continue to play an important role in Dundee’s long term regeneration and our position in the country. With the service now secured through this PSO, the council and its partners will carry on encouraging as many people as possible to make use of the London link.

The funding marks the first ever UK government PSO, following Dundee City Council’s application for support from the Regional Air Connectivity fund. The fund, announced in the 2013 Spending Round, can be used to maintain important regional air connections, where they are in danger of being lost. The government doubled the size of the fund to £20 million per year in the 2014 Budget.

In addition, the government aims to set up a second PSO agreement for the Newquay-London air link after the existing commercial carrier announced it would no longer operate the route from October 2014. The twice daily flights would attract business investment and tourists to Cornwall and offer an important additional travel option to the railway and roads.

More  information about the Regional Air Connectivity Fund.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-funding-for-dundee-to-london-stansted-air-link

.

.

.

SInce then:

 

Scottish Transport Minister warns Dundee Airport still faces major challenges even with £2.85 million PSO help

The Scottish Transport Minister has said that Dundee Airport still faces a challenge after the £2.85 million funding guaranteeing its future for 2 years was approved. Councillors agreed the public service obligation (PSO) between Westminster and Dundee City Council, which guarantees the money to keep the Dundee to London (Stansted) air route open. Scottish Transport Minister Keith Brown, while welcoming the deal, said it was only part of securing the long-term future of the airport. Dundee Airport can now start looking forward. The airport faces a challenge in the increasingly competitive aviation market and needs to continue looking at all the available options to encourage more passengers and businesses to use it. They might be able to drum up business from the offshore renewable energy sector. The PSO funding comes from the new Regional Air Connectivity fund and is the first funding of its kind.

Click here to view full story…

.

.

.


.

Airports Commission said:

“In addition to safeguarding an airport slot, the Government may also ‘where appropriate’ provide funding to an airline to compensate its running a non-commercially viable service. In the UK Dundee City Council has undertaken a tender process to find an operator to provide a PSO service between Dundee and London. And the Commission understands that Cornwall County Council has been in discussion with the Department for Transport and will shortly be in a position to launch a tender process for a Newquay to London route. Prior to these recent establishments, the UK’s only PSOs operated between Scottish islands, or from these islands into the mainland.”

.

.

.

 

Read more »

London City Airport now re-consulting on its expansion planning application

London City Airport has a planning application, initially submitted in July 2013, originally with 28th October as the comment deadline, for “Works to demolish existing buildings and structures and provide additional infrastructure and passenger facilities at London City Airport without changes to the number of permitted flights or opening hours previously permitted pursuant to planning permission.” The comment deadline was extended to 18th December. The local authority, Newham Council, has now announced that it will be re-consulting on the application. The deadline for comment is now 10th July, with the application expected to go to committee on 23rd July 2014.  There have so been 1,282 responses to the application, all of which appear to be objecting to it.  The airport said last year they were extending the deadline so”as many local people and wider stakeholders as possible can make their voices heard.” There was another deadline of 2nd May, for a consultation on extra material the Mayor and Newham asked of the airport, including an Environmental Statement, addendum etc….
.
.

 

13/01228/FUL 

RE: RECONSULTATION FOLLOWING REVISIONS TO THE PLANNING APPLICATION INCLUDING ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT.   SECOND ADDENDUM RECEIVED.

Planning Application CADP1:

Works to demolish existing buildings and structures and provide additional infrastructure and passenger facilities at London City Airport without changes to the number of permitted flights or opening hours previously permitted pursuant to planning permission 07/01510/VAR.

Detailed planning permission is being sought for:

(a) Demolition of existing buildings and structures;

(b) 4 no. upgraded aircraft stands and 7 new aircraft parking stands;

(c) Extension and modification of the existing airfield, including the creation of an extended taxilane;

(d) Emergency vehicle access point over King George V Dock;

(e) Replacement landside Forecourtto include vehicle circulation, pick up and drop off areas and hard and soft landscaping;

(f) Eastern Extension to the existing Terminal Building (including alteration works to the existing Terminal);

(g) Construction of a 3 storey passenger pier to the east of the existing Terminal;

(h) Erection of Noise Barriers;

(i) Western Extension and alterations to the existing Terminal;

(j) Western Energy Centre, storage, ancillary accommodation and landscaping;l;

(k) Facilitation Works including temporary coaching facility and extension to the outbound baggage area;

(l) Upgrading works to Hartmann Road;

(n) Passenger and staff parking, car hire parking, taxi feeder park and ancillary and related work;

 

(m) Passenger and staff parking, car hire parking, taxi feeder park and ancillary and related work;

(o) Eastern Energy Centre;

(p) Dock Source Heat Exchange System within King George V Dock; and

(q) Ancillary and related work

.

The applications is accompanied by an Environmental Statement.

.

 London City Airport Hartmann Road Silvertown London E16 2PX

Documents etc  (including consultation responses) can be seen at

https://pa.newham.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=dates&keyVal=MPRZM4JY06V00

 

.

There are so far 1,282 consultation responses, of which virtually all appear to be objections. See at consultation responses 

.

 


 

Earlier:

Public consultation on London City Airport planning applications extended to 18th December 2013

29 October 2013  (Newham council)

We are extending our public consultation on London City Airport planning applications to midday on 18 December 2013.

Due to the number of responses to the London City Airport planning consultation, including many who have asked for extra time to submit a response, we have decided to extend the deadline from 28 October 2013 until midday on Wednesday 18 December 2013.

The major planning applications propose additional infrastructure, passenger facilities and a new hotel at the airport. We will shortly be publicising the extended consultation deadline including writing to more than 25,000 homes in the local area.

A Newham Council spokesperson said:
“We know these are major planning applications and we already had a significant response by 28 October. We have extended the deadline until 18 December to ensure as many local people and wider stakeholders as possible can make their voices heard.”

Read our planning application notice (PDF) to find out more about the extension.

.
.

.

Earlier:

Public consultation on London City Airport planning applications extended to 18th December

October 30, 2013

Newham Council are extending their public consultation on London City Airport planning applications to midday on 18 December 2013. The deadline had been 28th October, but the application is mainly online, and the council planning website was down during some of the time. The planning application was presented in such an impenetrable manner on the Newham website that it was effectively impossible for ordinary people to understand what was proposed. Now Newham says that : “Due to the number of responses to the London City Airport planning consultation, including many who have asked for extra time to submit a response, we have decided to extend the deadline…. The major planning applications propose additional infrastructure, passenger facilities and a new hotel at the airport. We will shortly be publicising the extended consultation deadline including writing to more than 25,000 homes in the local area.” Local campaigners welcomed the extension and said the impacts of the expansion by London City Airport will affect the local area for generations to come, so it is important that local residents have the opportunity to get their voices heard.

Click here to view full story…

 


 

London City Airport expansion plan – inadequate consultation by Newham – but campaigners have produced guidance on how to respond

October 26, 2013

London City Airport applied back in July for expansion. While the application does not propose to increase the number of flights, it crucially changes the split between scheduled jets and jet centre movements leading to a change in the 2010 baseline public safety zone. The application is to demolish some buildings and structures, and upgrade four aircraft stands, adding 7 new aircraft parking stands. It would also mean extension and modification of the existing airfield, including the creation of an extended taxi lane.There would be changes to parking and vehicle access, and an extension to the terminal building. The consultation in on the Newham Council website (though on some days it has not bee accessible) – it ends on 28th October. There is a huge list of documents, with no accessible detail, making comment by ordinary people nearly impossible. London City Airport campaigners have located the key information, and produced a simple response email which anyone can (adapt and) use. There are real fears of more noise from the airport and building space removed form the enlarged public safety zones. Do send in a reply if you agree these proposals should be opposed.

Click here to view full story…

 


 

London City Airport submits expansion plans – to enable 50,000 more aircraft movements per year – to Newham Council

September 19, 2013     .

London City Airport has submitted its expansion plans to Newham Council. The plans could see an extra 50,000 flight movements each year, from the current level of around 64,000 in 2012 to around 120,000 (the level that was permitted by Newham in July 2009). The planned expansion could see the airport handling up to 6 million passengers per year, compared to around 3 million in 2012. The plans (costing some £200 million) would include 7 new parking stands, parking stands enlarged to cater for larger aircraft, due to arrive in 2016, a new eastern passenger pier and associated works on a platform over the King George V Dock. Plans also include an extension to the aircraft taxiway running along the eastern length of the runway, and a new passenger forecourt in front of the terminal building, an extension of the terminal, a new office building (to replace City Aviation House) and a hotel. Passenger and staff car parking will re-organised. The airport says it needs these, as morning and evening business flights were almost at capacity.     .

Click here to view full story…

 


 

Residents seek caste-iron guarantee that new planes will be quieter as City Airport seeks to expand

July 27, 2013     HACAN East, the organisation which represents residents under the London City and Heathrow flight paths, is concerned that that City Airport’s expansion plans, to be announced soon, will result in more noise across East and South-East London. The airport is proposing to undertake a lot of work on its runway and taxiways to allow bigger planes to use the airport. It is also proposing to expand the terminal, build a hotel and create more parking. HACAN East chair, John Stewart, said, “City Airport claims that the new planes will be quieter than the large aircraft currently using the airport. But residents need a caste-iron guarantee that the planes will actually be quieter. People need assurances after 25 years of broken promises by the airport. It opened by telling residents that the airport would only use ‘whispering’ jets.” London City’s expansion plans now go to Newham Council, the planning authority for the airport, for approval.

Click here to view full story…

.

.

.

 

Read more »

Heathrow uses glitch-free opening of T2 to try and persuade people it can build a 3rd runway

Heathrow’s new Terminal 2 – which cost the airport £2.5 billion – opened on 4th June, with no problems.  It  had a very low key and  unambitious opening, with just 6,000 passengers on the first day of operation – 0.03% of its 20 million passenger capacity – thereby avoiding the chaotic scenes which accompanied the opening of Terminal 5 in 2008. John Holland-Kaye, who takes over as Heathrow’s chief executive next month, claimed the new terminal would help Heathrow’s quest for a 3rd runway, as they managed to do it without anything going wrong (there were months of practices to ensure problems were avoided) and with Heathrow staying open.  Mr Holland-Kaye, who is paid to say this sort of thing, said perceptions and the “political landscape” about Heathrow had changed (no evidence given) over the past 5 – 6 years.  “We have been able to listen much more to the local community and changed our plans to be more acceptable. We have coming together a possibility of building a political consensus around Heathrow”….  But that really isn’t true….

.

 

 

Heathrow Terminal 2 ‘will make Britain more competitive’

Airport boss claims new £2.5bn facility will boost Britain’s economy and help the airport’s campaign for a third runway

Visitors arrive at the new Terminal 2. It has 60 check-in gates and 66 self-check-in kiosks, 29 security lanes, 33 shops, 17 restaurants, more than 7,000 seats, 634 toilets and 42 water fountains

Visitors arrive at the new Terminal 2. It has 60 check-in gates and 66 self-check-in kiosks, 29 security lanes, 33 shops, 17 restaurants, more than 7,000 seats, 634 toilets and 42 water fountains. Photo: Bloomberg
 

Heathrow’s new £2.5bn Terminal 2 will be a “game-changer” for the airport and give the UK economy a competitive edge over France and Germany, its new boss claimed on Wednesday.

The new terminal building opened without a hitch, welcoming just 6,000 passengers on the first day of operation – 0.03% of its 20 million passenger capacity – thereby avoiding the chaotic scenes which accompanied the opening of Terminal 5 in 2008.

John Holland-Kaye, who takes over as Heathrow’s chief executive next month, said the new terminal would help its quest for a third runway, insisting perceptions had changed since the airport’s last plans were rebuffed by the Coalition four years ago.

“What Terminal 2 does is it completely changes the balance because it shows our ambition to completely rebuild Heathrow airport while running it,” said Mr Holland-Kaye. “It is a game-changer in terms of people’s perception of what Heathrow is all about.

Terminal 2 replaces Heathrow’s first ever permanent building, which was opened by the Queen in 1955. The facility will eventually be home to 26 airlines, 23 of which are members of the Star Alliance group of carriers, including Air China, Lufthansa and Turkish Airlines. United was the first airline to start operating out of Terminal 2 on Wednesday but all 26 carriers will have moved by the end of October.

The new building will replace Terminal 1, which will close in October 2015 and eventually be demolished.

Mr Holland-Kaye said: “I think the political landscape has changed massively in the last five-six years. It has changed because people are much more aware of the benefits of jobs and growth that come from the airport, both as it is today and as an expanded airport. We have been able to listen much more to the local community and changed our plans to be more acceptable. We have coming together a possibility of building a political consensus around Heathrow which wasn’t there five years ago, both at a national level and local level.”

Mr Holland-Kaye said Terminal 2 would ensure Heathrow stays ahead of its closest rivals in Europe, Paris Charles de Gaulle and Frankfurt, which are all competing for business, particularly for routes to emerging markets.

“Not only do we have better long-haul connections than any other airport in the world, which is a huge benefit for the UK, we also have a world class airport. This will now be a better airport than Charles de Gaulle and Frankfurt. It makes us better able to compete as a country against the French and the Germans who are all chasing global growth.”

Heathrow has been preparing for the opening for the last six months to avoid the embarrassment of 2008, when flights had to be cancelled on the first day of Terminal 5’s operation and other passengers faced delays or lost baggage.

Terminal 5 was only completed two weeks before it opened but Heathrow has been road-testing Terminal 2 since last November with the help of 14,000 volunteers from local communities who pretended to be passengers.

The new building is part of a much wider overhaul of Heathrow which will eventually see passengers pass through two terminals, East and West. These will be formed from terminals two and five.

The airport will start looking at proposals for a £4.5bn extension to Terminal 2 in 2018-2019, although the extent of its investment plans will depend on whether Heathrow is selected for an additional runway by the Airports Commission.

Terminal 2 is home to 33 retailers, including John Lewis’s first airport shop. Celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal and pubs group Fuller’s have also opened food and drink outlets at the terminal.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/transport/10875588/Heathrow-Terminal-2-will-make-Britain-more-competitive.html

.


.

Heathrow chiefs’ relief as new Terminal 2 gets off to a flying start

Heathrow bosses breathed a massive sigh of relief today as the airport’s new £2.5 billion Terminal 2 survived its first morning without a major hitch.

Businessman Rao Mohan, 45, was the first passenger to emerge through the arrivals gate less than 20 minutes after his United Airlines flight from Chicago landed at 5.49am. He was greeted by a Beefeater stationed at the gate.

Mr Mohan said: “I fly into London a lot and I am really impressed by what I can see today. It is so bright and clean and gives a good impression of the UK. It is not often you get a Beefeater  meeting you so it is a pleasure to be part of this special day.”

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales was another of the first passengers off Flight UA958. He said: “The new terminal looks great, very impressive.”

Lucille Eckrich, 56, also flew in from the Windy City for a family holiday.She said: “My first impression is that this is a good job. We had no problems with our bags and were through quickly. The pomp and ceremony was nice and this gives a good impression of the UK.”

Airport bosses had been on tenterhooks for the official opening of the building, officially known as Terminal 2: The Queen’s Terminal.

They went to huge efforts to avoid a repeat of the fiasco when T5 opened in 2008.

In one of the darkest chapters in the airport’s history, hundreds of flights were cancelled and thousands of bags went missing.

But today the airport’s chief executive John Holland Kaye said: “It has been a fabulous start. We have learned the lessons of Terminal 5 and are not doing everything at once.

“We have had no problems so far and a lot of hard work has gone into making this start work. It should be said that Terminal 5 is now the best airport  terminal in the world.”

New airports including Berlin, Doha and Hong Kong have all suffered major setbacks on opening in recent years and Heathrow has gone to great lengths to avoid teething troubles, including 180 trials involving 14,000 volunteers.

When it is fully operational the new terminal  will cater for 20 million passengers a year compared with eight  million passengers at the original T2 before it was demolished in 2009.

It will handle 178 flights a day from United, Singapore Airlines, Lufthansa, US Airways, Aer Lingus and Virgin Atlantic Little Red and will be opened by the Queen and the Duke of  Edinburgh on June 23.

But Gavin Hayes of  the Let Britain Fly campaign said the terminal  “does little to relieve the huge pressure on UK aviation capacity” and urged a decision on extra runways.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/heathrow-chiefs-relief-as-new-terminal-2-gets-off-to-flying-start-9484127.html

.


.

This opening is really a huge exercise in expectation management, and the team here has been constantly saying there will be the odd glitch.

That’s not surprising considering that the opening of T5 was an absolute debacle, with lost luggage and delays.

Today Heathrow has gone for a very very soft launch. One airline and 34 flights.

Some critics have said that the airport wasn’t ambitious enough, but no-one is really going to blame Heathrow for starting slow and steady.

And so far so smooth at cavernous, light T2. The worst that the media has been able to uncover so far is some payphones not working.

Heathrow is trying to prove that it is a world-class airport and capable of expanding.

It wants a third runway, and the successful opening of T2 is very much part of proving it is up to the job of delivering new infrastructure.

Read more »

CEO of Birmingham airport says airlines should be encouraged to use regional airports

Paul Kehoe, chief executive of Birmingham Airport has urged the Government to get behind ‘great airports for great cities’.   Addressing a cross party reception of MPs, lords and business leaders in London following the Queen’s Speech, he said more needed to be done to maximise the use of what capacity the country has now in its city regions. The south east has a disproportionate amount of UK airport capacity.  Kehoe says Birmingham can now cater for long-haul flights to destinations such as China and the west coast of the US and will be even closer to the capital when,or if, HS2 opens.

Next month, it will be the first airport outside of London to host a flight to and from China. He told MPs: “The West Midlands is the only region in the UK with a positive balance of trade with China, with our advanced manufacturing base leading the way. He wants to see government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.  This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes.

.

 

Airlines should be encouraged to use regional airports

4.6.2014 (TravelMole)

Birmingham airport chief has called for the Government to change tax rules to encourage airlines to use spare airport capacity in the regions.

Paul Kehoe, CEO of Birmingham airport told MPS, Lords and business leaders that space at regional airports should be utilised rather than travellers having to travel through the ‘congested South East’.

He said in Birmingham’s case, the airport is just 70 minutes from London and, with its newly extended runway, it can cater for long haul routes to China and the US West Coast.

Kehoe said: “With air traffic set to double over the next fifty years, the Airports Commission is rightly looking at expanding UK airport capacity, but we also need to see Government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.

“This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes, and a concerted government-led marketing push around the world to let growing markets and foreign airlines know Britain’s city regions and our airports are open for business.”

On July 22nd, Birmingham Airport will become the country’s first airport outside London to host a flight to and from China.

http://www.travelmole.com/news_feature.php?news_id=2011834&c=setreg&region=2

.


 

Birmingham Airport chief urges MPs to back ‘great airports for great cities’

  • By Tamlyn Jones

Paul Kehoe, chief executive of Birmingham Airport has urged the Government to get behind ‘great airports for great cities’.

 

Addressing a cross party reception of MPs, lords and business leaders in London following the Queen’s Speech today, Paul Kehoe said more needed to be done to maximise the use of what capacity the country has now in its city regions.

The comments came as the South East’s airports become increasingly congested and the Airports Commission looks at long-term runway options.

Birmingham Airport can now cater for long-haul flights to destinations such as China and the west coast of the US and will be even closer to the capital when HS2 opens.

Next month, it will be the first airport outside of London to host a flight to and from China.

Mr Kehoe told MPs: “The West Midlands is the only region in the UK with a positive balance of trade with China, with our advanced manufacturing base leading the way.

“Businesses in the region and beyond tell us they want to fly to growing markets around the world from their local regional airport, not have to travel through the congested South East.

“With air traffic set to double over the next 50 years, the Airports Commission is rightly looking at expanding UK airport capacity but we also need to see government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.

“This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes and a concerted government-led marketing push around the world to let growing markets and foreign airlines know Britain’s city regions and our airports are open for business.”

http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news/regional-affairs/birmingham-airport-chief-urges-mps-7215448

.

.

.

Read more »

Stars to judge £10,000 Heathrow anti-runway campaign film competition – entry deadline 7th June

Zac Goldsmith had unveiled his star cast to judge a £10,000 anti-Heathrow airport expansion film competition. Presenter Holly Willoughby and Bafta award-winning director Nick Broomfield will join actor Hugh Grant and broadcaster Gyles Brandreth on the panel of judges for the “No Ifs No Buts” competition set up by Zac (MP for Richmond) with anti-expansion group Hacan. The nationwide competition was launched 2 months ago to highlight opposition to the 3rd runway at Heathrow. Entrants have been asked to submit a 2-minute video saying why a 3rd runway should not be built. The short-listed entries will be judged by at a gala night in the Richmond Theatre in front of 800 guests on June 18, with a £10,000 prize.  Zac said: “Heathrow expansion is not politically deliverable. The arguments against it are stacking up every week and the opposition is organised and growing ….. A green light for Heathrow expansion is effectively a green light for a vast, foreign-owned and taxpayer-subsidised monopoly on one edge of our great city. It is astonishing that the idea is even in consideration.”

.

Stars to judge £10,000 airport campaign films

 02 June 2014 (Evening Standard)

Campaigner Zac Goldsmith today unveiled a star cast to judge a £10,000 anti-Heathrow airport expansion film competition.

Presenter Holly Willoughby and Bafta award-winning director Nick Broomfield will join actor Hugh Grant and broadcaster Gyles Brandreth on the panel of judges for t he No Ifs No Buts competition set up by the Richmond MP with anti-expansion group Hacan.

The nationwide competition was launched two months ago to highlight opposition to the third runway at Heathrow. Entrants have been asked to submit a two-minute video saying why a third runway should not be built.

The shortlisted entries will be judged by at a gala night in the Richmond Theatre in front of 800 guests on June 18, with a £10,000 prize.

Mr Goldsmith said: “Heathrow expansion is not politically deliverable. The arguments against it are stacking up every week and the opposition is organised and growing.

“As if all the other arguments aren’t strong enough, Heathrow itself has finally admitted it cannot cope with the congestion of a third runway without adding a whole new tax on passengers.

“We have a great panel and lots of entrants. I hope there will be some powerful contributions…

“A green light for Heathrow expansion is effectively a green light for a vast, foreign-owned and taxpayer-subsidised monopoly on one edge of our great city. It is astonishing that the idea is even in consideration.”

Richmond Theatre, June 18. Email zac@zacgoldsmith.com to book a seat.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/stars-to-judge-10000-airport-campaign-films-9471770.html

.


‘NO IFS; NO BUTS’

Opposed to a Third Runway at Heathrow? Enter our Video Competition!

The deadline is 7th June.

http://www.no-ifs-no-buts.com/


.

Zac Goldsmith and HACAN launch short film contest over Heathrow 3rd runway plan

24 March 2014
Tory MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston, and environmental campaigner, Zac Goldsmith has launched a film competition  (with HACAN) to highlight opposition to a 3rd Heathrow runway – with £10,000 as the first prize.  In an escalation of the anti-expansion campaign at Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith has also recruited celebrities to the cause with actor Hugh Grant and former Tory MP Giles Brandreth among the competition judges.  Entrants to the competition will need to submit a short film (under 2 minutes) to highlight opposition to the runway.  Short-listed entries will be judged by the panel at a gala evening of 800 guests at the Richmond Theatre on 18th June with the prize money provided by Zac.  The competition is called “No Ifs, No Buts”, recalling David Cameron’s infamous pre-election pledge made in 2009 to an audience in Richmond not to allow a 3rd runway to be built at Heathrow. The competition is looking for powerful messages that will be taken up on social and conventional media, and ram home the message that Heathrow expansion is not only the wrong solution for our economy, it is politically undeliverable. The closing date for video entries is 1st June [now 7th June]. .

.


The closing date for video entries is 7th June.
More details about the competition can be found at www.no-ifs-no-buts.com
.

Amateur or professional, it’s your chance to be creative! Submit a video………anything up to 2 minutes long to show why Heathrow expansion is the wrong answer. The best 10 entries will be screened at the Richmond theatre in June in front of celebrity judges.

.

No ifs No buts   Actual text from Conservative election leaflet for the May 2010 election. Full leaflet at  http://www.electionleaflets.org/leaflets/full/b58fa8c95aec5d810bfe2ebb16bcbf91/ .


.

Read more »

Thousands across France will converge on Nantes for 5/6th July – many marching with walking stick relay

Over the weekend of 5th and 6th July , there will be another massive mobilisation at Notre Dame des Landes, against the planned new airport – to replace the existing Nantes airport. Thousands will attend from across France. There are around 200 support committees across the country, working to oppose the airport. Now there will be “convergences” from across France, where people are already setting out to walk to the protest. Others will travel, by bike, and many also by vehicle – having attended protest rallies in the areas from where they start. The chosen symbol for these marches, or “caravans” will be their walking sticks. Remembering the civil protests in the 1970s against a military camp at Larzac, those walking will bring with them a walking stick (engraved with their name, and the region from which they come), and the rhythmic noise of these clacking on the tarmac will be, as with the Larzac march to Paris in 1978, the sound signature of this part of the  protest. Those who cannot complete the whole march will pass on their walking sticks as a relay, so they arrive at Notre Dame des Landes.
.

 

logoFBconvergences

Message from the organizing team of the Convergence NDL 2014.
The next big rally against the National Ayraultport (Airport) project will take place at Notre Dame des Landes (NDL) on 5 and 6 July 2014. We want to make this gathering a festive time but certainly militant.
It will be to demonstrate that we are more determined than ever and massively mobilized with unfailing motivation against this totally unnecessary and against all GPII, against the devastation and grabbing agricultural land and biodiversity against a model of society imposed which does not suit us and leads us straight into the wall.
Along with the implementation of this gathering, we plan to organize the widest possible convergence NDL; with “caravans” (walking, bicycles, tractors, cars …), which would leave the main sites of struggle where the Great Unnecessary and Imposed Projects (GPII  – les Grands Projets Inutiles et Imposés) and converge to NDL (organizing information meetings, gatherings, meeting in urban and rural crossings on the route) to arrive at the final rally.
The principle of this action was approved by the Coordination of opponents (with more than 50 organizations) and meeting support committees January 18, 2014 Fay de Bretagne.
We therefore appeal to you to see the conditions to complete this action.
To contact the organizing team: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com
Blog dédié : http://convergencesNDL.over-blog.com
To organize the convergence this summer, the convergence group await the support committee representatives from 9am during St. Peter in order to make the first contact for some and especially present the project.
More info here

http://communiques-acipa.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/une-convergence-vers-notre-dame-des.html

.


 

.

THORENS-GLIÈRES (Near the Alps)

Départ de la marche vers Notre-Dame-des-Landes

1.6.2014

Les marcheurs pour Notre-Dame-des-Landes sont partis hier en fin d’après-midi, en chantant. Les marcheurs pour Notre Dame des Landes s’apprêtent à partir en chanson.

http://www.ledauphine.com/haute-savoie/2014/05/31/depart-de-la-marche-vers-notre-dame-des-landes

 


Convergences 4 posters

 

 

Images of the posters from  http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/est.html 

Convergences 4 posters 2

 

 


 

convergencesNDL.over-blog.com

 

http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/

Publié le 19 Mai 2014
[Imperfect translation into English below].

TOGETHER to strengthen actions against the Great Unnecessary Imposed Projects (GPII) for the preservation of agricultural land and jobs, for a choice of society that no longer endangers biodiversity and future generations …

Let’s make the next big national rally against the airport project on 5 and 6 July 2014 a militant and festive time of sharing information!

TOGETHER we will demonstrate that we are more determined than ever and massively mobilized.

This convergence is an opportunity from local struggles, decentralized throughout the country, to popularize and unite these struggles.

It will result in different forms of action plans:

• “caravans” (walking, bicycles, tractors, cars …)
• meeting points, information
• meetings in cities and rural areas travelled through, on the way to get to the final rally on the grounds of Bellevue on July 4 at around 19:00 .

8 decentralized rallies are planned at the weekend of June 28 and 29 as well as 3 large gatherings on 2 and 3 July.

6 major routes will emerge from 1 June

More than 10 caravans with stages in their journey will stop in symbolic places of struggle.

A great movement, throughout France starts to denounce the “artificialisaiton” of farmland and major harmful projects.

All paths converge at Notre Dame des Landes and the big rally on 5 and 6 July 2014.

If you want to participate by joining a caravan :

the tabs on top you have different caravans (bike / foot or vehicle) with the path to find the one that suits you best. You can contact officials, register and get information by leaving your email or phone number.

If you cannot follow a caravan but want to participate ?

Join one of the largest gatherings offered in the area where you are. A number or email address is available for contact. You may also be able to take part in one or two stages, depending on your availability.

For more information, contact us: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com

The symbol of convergence: Walking stick

HISTORY OF THE STICK

On December 2, 1978, the peasants of Larzac ]. finished their work and come to Paris.
[Larzac was a 10 year struggle by farmers etc against a large government military camp. It was finally won, and the way it was carried out has been an inspiration to other social struggles, and civil disobedience, across France ever since.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutte_du_Larzac].

They took shepherd’s crooks, used by the shepherds on the Larzac plateau, and in an impressive silence, they advanced to the rhythm of the walking sticks hitting the tarmac rhythmically in front of many mobile guards who were waiting for them.

Published April 4, 2014

relays

Michel’s walking stick will be carried as a relay  (Michel is a veteran campaigner against the NDDL airport, and has resisted it for years. He endured a one month hunger strike a few years ago – fasting for longer than anyone else was able to).

In November 2013, Michel Tarin* wrote: “I will go with my walking stick, with me remaining strength and in non-violence, on this ground, and we will defend it,square meter by square meter! I will not use my stick to bash the police but, as when our friends from Larzac went up to Paris, we will make our sticks resonate on the lands of the ZAD our sticks on land ZAD to protect if from the the programmed rampage … “

In May 2014, while the convergence towards NDDL were being organised, Michel expresses the idea that each person should bring with them a walking stick that will resonate in all places visited on the way to the ZAD at Notre Dame des Landes.

We have taken up his idea and made the stick the symbol of our struggle.

Michel’s stick will be at the rally at Glières on 31st May, and will be carried, from hand to hand and from struggle and struggle to NDDL on the 4th July.

INSTRUCTIONS

Obtain, or make yourself, a walking stick.
Wood is recommended.
Engrave into the wood your name or nickname …your department … the date …

Take this stick to NDDL making it resonate through all the places of struggle you pass through.

You can also use it to support yourself and lean on.

If you are not going to NDDL, give your stick to someone else who will carry it on to the next step until it reaches its destination.

.

http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/

.


In French:

ENSEMBLE pour renforcer les actions contre les Grands Projets Inutiles Imposés (GPII), pour la préservation des terres et des emplois agricoles, pour un autre choix de société qui ne mettrait plus en danger la biodiversité et l’avenir des générations futures…

Faisons du prochain grand rassemblement national contre le projet d’aéroport des 5 et 6 juillet 2014 un moment d’informations et d’échanges militant et festif !

Nous ferons ENSEMBLE la démonstration que nous restons plus que jamais déterminés et massivement mobilisés.

Cette convergence est l’occasion, à partir des luttes locales, décentralisées sur tout le territoire, de populariser et de fédérer ces luttes.

Elle se traduira par différentes formes d’actions déterminées:

• “caravanes” (à pied, vélos, tracteurs, voitures…)

• points de rencontre, d’information

• meetings dans les villes et campagnes traversées pour arriver au moment du rassemblement final sur les terres de Bellevue le 4 juillet vers 19h00.

8 rassemblements décentralisés sont envisagés au week end du 28 et 29 juin ainsi que3 grandes convergences les 2 et 3 juillet.

6 grands parcours se dessineront à partir du 1°Juin.

Plus de 10 caravanes avec des étapes s’arrêteront dans des lieux symboliques de luttes.

Un grand mouvement , à travers toute la France se met en marche pour dénoncer l’artificialisation des terres agricoles et les grands projets nuisibles.

Tous les chemins convergent vers Notre Dame des Landes et son grand rassemblement des 5 et 6 Juillet 2014.

Vous souhaitez y participer en rejoignant une caravanesur les onglets en haut vous avez les différentes caravanes (à vélo/à pied ou motorisées) avec les trajet pour trouver celle qui vous correspond le mieux. Vous avez un mail ou un numéro pour contacter les responsables, vous inscrire et obtenir des renseignements.

Vous ne pouvez pas suivre une caravane mais vous souhaitez participer? Rejoignez un des grands rassemblements proposés dans la région où vous êtes. Un numéro ou un mail est à disposition pour prendre contact. Vous pouvez aussi faire une ou deux étapes suivant vos disponibilités.

Pour toute information, contactez nous: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com

Le symbole des convergences: Le Bâton

HISTOIRE DE BÂTON

2 décembre 1978, les paysans du Larzac finissent leur marche et arrivent à Paris.

Ils se sont appropriés le bâton des bergers du causse et, dans un silence impressionnant, ils avancent au rythme des bâtons qui frappent le bitume en cadence au devant des nombreux gardes mobiles qui les attendent.

Novembre 2013, Michel Tarin écrit : »J’irai avec mon bâton, avec les forces qui me restent et dans la non-violence, sur le terrain et nous le défendrons mètre carré par mètre carré ! Je n’utiliserai pas mon bâton pour cogner sur les forces de police mais, comme lorsque les copains du Larzac montaient à Paris, nous ferons résonner le chant de nos bâtons sur les terres de la ZAD pour les protéger du saccage programmé… »

Mai 2014, alors que s’organisent les convergences vers NDL, Michel émet l’idée que chaque personne apporte son bâton qui résonnera dans tous les lieux traversés jusqu’à la ZAD de NDL.

Nous avons repris son idée et fait du bâton le symbole de notre lutte.

Quant au bâton de Michel, il sera le 31 mai au rassemblement des Glières et sera rapporté, de mains en mains et de luttes en luttes, à NDL le 4 juillet.

NOTICE D’UTILISATION

Procurez-vous, fabriquez-vous un bâton de marche.

Le bois est recommandé. Méfiez-vous des contre-façons.

Gravez dans le bois votre nom ou surnom…votre département…la date…

Apportez ce bâton à NDL en le faisant résonner sur tous les lieux de lutte que vous traverserez.

Vous pouvez aussi vous en servir pour vous appuyer.

Si vous n’allez pas à NDL, confiez-le à une autre personne qui l’apportera jusqu’à l’étape suivante jusqu’à ce qu’il arrive à destination.

 

.

.


.

Larzac marches – 1978

from Wikipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fight_for_the_Larzac

Paris marches

“More ingenious tactics were soon put in play. On 25 October 1974, a flock of 60 sheep were transported to Paris and set to grazing on the Champ de Mars, right under the Eiffel Tower. To inquiring gendarmes, the shepherds explained that it was publicity for Roquefort cheese.

Earlier, a protest march on Paris had been triggered by the signature of the decree of expropriation in the public interest, on 26 December 1972. The march began on the following 7 January, with stops at RodezSaint-FlourClermont-FerrandNevers and Orléans.[3] At each stop, marchers were welcomed and lodged by local committees. Meetings, rallies, and press conferences were organised.[14]

Police and local authorities were much less welcoming. The marchers were harassed at every stop-over. Finally, at Orléans, the procession was blocked by the CRS (French riot police) and their 26 tractors impounded. Bernard Lambert, leader of the Mouvement des Paysans Travailleurs (Working Peasant Movement), promptly arranged for the loan of 26 tractors belonging to farmers in the Orléans area, the CRS were outflanked, and the march proceeded to Paris.[3]

A second Paris march began on 2 December 1978. 18 Larzac farmers walked 710 km in 25 stages. The CRS blocked the centre of Paris, but 40,000 supporters rallied on the outskirts, making the largest demonstration of the year.”

.

.


Acipa cow plane

 

Read more »