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Heathrow uses glitch-free opening of T2 to try and persuade people it can build a 3rd runway

Heathrow’s new Terminal 2 – which cost the airport £2.5 billion – opened on 4th June, with no problems.  It  had a very low key and  unambitious opening, with just 6,000 passengers on the first day of operation – 0.03% of its 20 million passenger capacity – thereby avoiding the chaotic scenes which accompanied the opening of Terminal 5 in 2008. John Holland-Kaye, who takes over as Heathrow’s chief executive next month, claimed the new terminal would help Heathrow’s quest for a 3rd runway, as they managed to do it without anything going wrong (there were months of practices to ensure problems were avoided) and with Heathrow staying open.  Mr Holland-Kaye, who is paid to say this sort of thing, said perceptions and the “political landscape” about Heathrow had changed (no evidence given) over the past 5 – 6 years.  “We have been able to listen much more to the local community and changed our plans to be more acceptable. We have coming together a possibility of building a political consensus around Heathrow”….  But that really isn’t true….

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Heathrow Terminal 2 ‘will make Britain more competitive’

Airport boss claims new £2.5bn facility will boost Britain’s economy and help the airport’s campaign for a third runway

Visitors arrive at the new Terminal 2. It has 60 check-in gates and 66 self-check-in kiosks, 29 security lanes, 33 shops, 17 restaurants, more than 7,000 seats, 634 toilets and 42 water fountains

Visitors arrive at the new Terminal 2. It has 60 check-in gates and 66 self-check-in kiosks, 29 security lanes, 33 shops, 17 restaurants, more than 7,000 seats, 634 toilets and 42 water fountains. Photo: Bloomberg
 

Heathrow’s new £2.5bn Terminal 2 will be a “game-changer” for the airport and give the UK economy a competitive edge over France and Germany, its new boss claimed on Wednesday.

The new terminal building opened without a hitch, welcoming just 6,000 passengers on the first day of operation – 0.03% of its 20 million passenger capacity – thereby avoiding the chaotic scenes which accompanied the opening of Terminal 5 in 2008.

John Holland-Kaye, who takes over as Heathrow’s chief executive next month, said the new terminal would help its quest for a third runway, insisting perceptions had changed since the airport’s last plans were rebuffed by the Coalition four years ago.

“What Terminal 2 does is it completely changes the balance because it shows our ambition to completely rebuild Heathrow airport while running it,” said Mr Holland-Kaye. “It is a game-changer in terms of people’s perception of what Heathrow is all about.

Terminal 2 replaces Heathrow’s first ever permanent building, which was opened by the Queen in 1955. The facility will eventually be home to 26 airlines, 23 of which are members of the Star Alliance group of carriers, including Air China, Lufthansa and Turkish Airlines. United was the first airline to start operating out of Terminal 2 on Wednesday but all 26 carriers will have moved by the end of October.

The new building will replace Terminal 1, which will close in October 2015 and eventually be demolished.

Mr Holland-Kaye said: “I think the political landscape has changed massively in the last five-six years. It has changed because people are much more aware of the benefits of jobs and growth that come from the airport, both as it is today and as an expanded airport. We have been able to listen much more to the local community and changed our plans to be more acceptable. We have coming together a possibility of building a political consensus around Heathrow which wasn’t there five years ago, both at a national level and local level.”

Mr Holland-Kaye said Terminal 2 would ensure Heathrow stays ahead of its closest rivals in Europe, Paris Charles de Gaulle and Frankfurt, which are all competing for business, particularly for routes to emerging markets.

“Not only do we have better long-haul connections than any other airport in the world, which is a huge benefit for the UK, we also have a world class airport. This will now be a better airport than Charles de Gaulle and Frankfurt. It makes us better able to compete as a country against the French and the Germans who are all chasing global growth.”

Heathrow has been preparing for the opening for the last six months to avoid the embarrassment of 2008, when flights had to be cancelled on the first day of Terminal 5’s operation and other passengers faced delays or lost baggage.

Terminal 5 was only completed two weeks before it opened but Heathrow has been road-testing Terminal 2 since last November with the help of 14,000 volunteers from local communities who pretended to be passengers.

The new building is part of a much wider overhaul of Heathrow which will eventually see passengers pass through two terminals, East and West. These will be formed from terminals two and five.

The airport will start looking at proposals for a £4.5bn extension to Terminal 2 in 2018-2019, although the extent of its investment plans will depend on whether Heathrow is selected for an additional runway by the Airports Commission.

Terminal 2 is home to 33 retailers, including John Lewis’s first airport shop. Celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal and pubs group Fuller’s have also opened food and drink outlets at the terminal.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/transport/10875588/Heathrow-Terminal-2-will-make-Britain-more-competitive.html

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Heathrow chiefs’ relief as new Terminal 2 gets off to a flying start

Heathrow bosses breathed a massive sigh of relief today as the airport’s new £2.5 billion Terminal 2 survived its first morning without a major hitch.

Businessman Rao Mohan, 45, was the first passenger to emerge through the arrivals gate less than 20 minutes after his United Airlines flight from Chicago landed at 5.49am. He was greeted by a Beefeater stationed at the gate.

Mr Mohan said: “I fly into London a lot and I am really impressed by what I can see today. It is so bright and clean and gives a good impression of the UK. It is not often you get a Beefeater  meeting you so it is a pleasure to be part of this special day.”

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales was another of the first passengers off Flight UA958. He said: “The new terminal looks great, very impressive.”

Lucille Eckrich, 56, also flew in from the Windy City for a family holiday.She said: “My first impression is that this is a good job. We had no problems with our bags and were through quickly. The pomp and ceremony was nice and this gives a good impression of the UK.”

Airport bosses had been on tenterhooks for the official opening of the building, officially known as Terminal 2: The Queen’s Terminal.

They went to huge efforts to avoid a repeat of the fiasco when T5 opened in 2008.

In one of the darkest chapters in the airport’s history, hundreds of flights were cancelled and thousands of bags went missing.

But today the airport’s chief executive John Holland Kaye said: “It has been a fabulous start. We have learned the lessons of Terminal 5 and are not doing everything at once.

“We have had no problems so far and a lot of hard work has gone into making this start work. It should be said that Terminal 5 is now the best airport  terminal in the world.”

New airports including Berlin, Doha and Hong Kong have all suffered major setbacks on opening in recent years and Heathrow has gone to great lengths to avoid teething troubles, including 180 trials involving 14,000 volunteers.

When it is fully operational the new terminal  will cater for 20 million passengers a year compared with eight  million passengers at the original T2 before it was demolished in 2009.

It will handle 178 flights a day from United, Singapore Airlines, Lufthansa, US Airways, Aer Lingus and Virgin Atlantic Little Red and will be opened by the Queen and the Duke of  Edinburgh on June 23.

But Gavin Hayes of  the Let Britain Fly campaign said the terminal  “does little to relieve the huge pressure on UK aviation capacity” and urged a decision on extra runways.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/heathrow-chiefs-relief-as-new-terminal-2-gets-off-to-flying-start-9484127.html

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This opening is really a huge exercise in expectation management, and the team here has been constantly saying there will be the odd glitch.

That’s not surprising considering that the opening of T5 was an absolute debacle, with lost luggage and delays.

Today Heathrow has gone for a very very soft launch. One airline and 34 flights.

Some critics have said that the airport wasn’t ambitious enough, but no-one is really going to blame Heathrow for starting slow and steady.

And so far so smooth at cavernous, light T2. The worst that the media has been able to uncover so far is some payphones not working.

Heathrow is trying to prove that it is a world-class airport and capable of expanding.

It wants a third runway, and the successful opening of T2 is very much part of proving it is up to the job of delivering new infrastructure.

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CEO of Birmingham airport says airlines should be encouraged to use regional airports

Paul Kehoe, chief executive of Birmingham Airport has urged the Government to get behind ‘great airports for great cities’.   Addressing a cross party reception of MPs, lords and business leaders in London following the Queen’s Speech, he said more needed to be done to maximise the use of what capacity the country has now in its city regions. The south east has a disproportionate amount of UK airport capacity.  Kehoe says Birmingham can now cater for long-haul flights to destinations such as China and the west coast of the US and will be even closer to the capital when,or if, HS2 opens.

Next month, it will be the first airport outside of London to host a flight to and from China. He told MPs: “The West Midlands is the only region in the UK with a positive balance of trade with China, with our advanced manufacturing base leading the way. He wants to see government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.  This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes.

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Airlines should be encouraged to use regional airports

4.6.2014 (TravelMole)

Birmingham airport chief has called for the Government to change tax rules to encourage airlines to use spare airport capacity in the regions.

Paul Kehoe, CEO of Birmingham airport told MPS, Lords and business leaders that space at regional airports should be utilised rather than travellers having to travel through the ‘congested South East’.

He said in Birmingham’s case, the airport is just 70 minutes from London and, with its newly extended runway, it can cater for long haul routes to China and the US West Coast.

Kehoe said: “With air traffic set to double over the next fifty years, the Airports Commission is rightly looking at expanding UK airport capacity, but we also need to see Government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.

“This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes, and a concerted government-led marketing push around the world to let growing markets and foreign airlines know Britain’s city regions and our airports are open for business.”

On July 22nd, Birmingham Airport will become the country’s first airport outside London to host a flight to and from China.

http://www.travelmole.com/news_feature.php?news_id=2011834&c=setreg&region=2

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Birmingham Airport chief urges MPs to back ‘great airports for great cities’

  • By Tamlyn Jones

Paul Kehoe, chief executive of Birmingham Airport has urged the Government to get behind ‘great airports for great cities’.

 

Addressing a cross party reception of MPs, lords and business leaders in London following the Queen’s Speech today, Paul Kehoe said more needed to be done to maximise the use of what capacity the country has now in its city regions.

The comments came as the South East’s airports become increasingly congested and the Airports Commission looks at long-term runway options.

Birmingham Airport can now cater for long-haul flights to destinations such as China and the west coast of the US and will be even closer to the capital when HS2 opens.

Next month, it will be the first airport outside of London to host a flight to and from China.

Mr Kehoe told MPs: “The West Midlands is the only region in the UK with a positive balance of trade with China, with our advanced manufacturing base leading the way.

“Businesses in the region and beyond tell us they want to fly to growing markets around the world from their local regional airport, not have to travel through the congested South East.

“With air traffic set to double over the next 50 years, the Airports Commission is rightly looking at expanding UK airport capacity but we also need to see government action to make better use of the airports and runways we have already.

“This means changes to tax rules to encourage airlines to use regional airports for long haul routes and a concerted government-led marketing push around the world to let growing markets and foreign airlines know Britain’s city regions and our airports are open for business.”

http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news/regional-affairs/birmingham-airport-chief-urges-mps-7215448

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Stars to judge £10,000 Heathrow anti-runway campaign film competition – entry deadline 7th June

Zac Goldsmith had unveiled his star cast to judge a £10,000 anti-Heathrow airport expansion film competition. Presenter Holly Willoughby and Bafta award-winning director Nick Broomfield will join actor Hugh Grant and broadcaster Gyles Brandreth on the panel of judges for the “No Ifs No Buts” competition set up by Zac (MP for Richmond) with anti-expansion group Hacan. The nationwide competition was launched 2 months ago to highlight opposition to the 3rd runway at Heathrow. Entrants have been asked to submit a 2-minute video saying why a 3rd runway should not be built. The short-listed entries will be judged by at a gala night in the Richmond Theatre in front of 800 guests on June 18, with a £10,000 prize.  Zac said: “Heathrow expansion is not politically deliverable. The arguments against it are stacking up every week and the opposition is organised and growing ….. A green light for Heathrow expansion is effectively a green light for a vast, foreign-owned and taxpayer-subsidised monopoly on one edge of our great city. It is astonishing that the idea is even in consideration.”

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Stars to judge £10,000 airport campaign films

 02 June 2014 (Evening Standard)

Campaigner Zac Goldsmith today unveiled a star cast to judge a £10,000 anti-Heathrow airport expansion film competition.

Presenter Holly Willoughby and Bafta award-winning director Nick Broomfield will join actor Hugh Grant and broadcaster Gyles Brandreth on the panel of judges for t he No Ifs No Buts competition set up by the Richmond MP with anti-expansion group Hacan.

The nationwide competition was launched two months ago to highlight opposition to the third runway at Heathrow. Entrants have been asked to submit a two-minute video saying why a third runway should not be built.

The shortlisted entries will be judged by at a gala night in the Richmond Theatre in front of 800 guests on June 18, with a £10,000 prize.

Mr Goldsmith said: “Heathrow expansion is not politically deliverable. The arguments against it are stacking up every week and the opposition is organised and growing.

“As if all the other arguments aren’t strong enough, Heathrow itself has finally admitted it cannot cope with the congestion of a third runway without adding a whole new tax on passengers.

“We have a great panel and lots of entrants. I hope there will be some powerful contributions…

“A green light for Heathrow expansion is effectively a green light for a vast, foreign-owned and taxpayer-subsidised monopoly on one edge of our great city. It is astonishing that the idea is even in consideration.”

Richmond Theatre, June 18. Email zac@zacgoldsmith.com to book a seat.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/stars-to-judge-10000-airport-campaign-films-9471770.html

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‘NO IFS; NO BUTS’

Opposed to a Third Runway at Heathrow? Enter our Video Competition!

The deadline is 7th June.

http://www.no-ifs-no-buts.com/


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Zac Goldsmith and HACAN launch short film contest over Heathrow 3rd runway plan

24 March 2014
Tory MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston, and environmental campaigner, Zac Goldsmith has launched a film competition  (with HACAN) to highlight opposition to a 3rd Heathrow runway – with £10,000 as the first prize.  In an escalation of the anti-expansion campaign at Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith has also recruited celebrities to the cause with actor Hugh Grant and former Tory MP Giles Brandreth among the competition judges.  Entrants to the competition will need to submit a short film (under 2 minutes) to highlight opposition to the runway.  Short-listed entries will be judged by the panel at a gala evening of 800 guests at the Richmond Theatre on 18th June with the prize money provided by Zac.  The competition is called “No Ifs, No Buts”, recalling David Cameron’s infamous pre-election pledge made in 2009 to an audience in Richmond not to allow a 3rd runway to be built at Heathrow. The competition is looking for powerful messages that will be taken up on social and conventional media, and ram home the message that Heathrow expansion is not only the wrong solution for our economy, it is politically undeliverable. The closing date for video entries is 1st June [now 7th June]. .

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The closing date for video entries is 7th June.
More details about the competition can be found at www.no-ifs-no-buts.com
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Amateur or professional, it’s your chance to be creative! Submit a video………anything up to 2 minutes long to show why Heathrow expansion is the wrong answer. The best 10 entries will be screened at the Richmond theatre in June in front of celebrity judges.

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No ifs No buts   Actual text from Conservative election leaflet for the May 2010 election. Full leaflet at  http://www.electionleaflets.org/leaflets/full/b58fa8c95aec5d810bfe2ebb16bcbf91/ .


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Thousands across France will converge on Nantes for 5/6th July – many marching with walking stick relay

Over the weekend of 5th and 6th July , there will be another massive mobilisation at Notre Dame des Landes, against the planned new airport – to replace the existing Nantes airport. Thousands will attend from across France. There are around 200 support committees across the country, working to oppose the airport. Now there will be “convergences” from across France, where people are already setting out to walk to the protest. Others will travel, by bike, and many also by vehicle – having attended protest rallies in the areas from where they start. The chosen symbol for these marches, or “caravans” will be their walking sticks. Remembering the civil protests in the 1970s against a military camp at Larzac, those walking will bring with them a walking stick (engraved with their name, and the region from which they come), and the rhythmic noise of these clacking on the tarmac will be, as with the Larzac march to Paris in 1978, the sound signature of this part of the  protest. Those who cannot complete the whole march will pass on their walking sticks as a relay, so they arrive at Notre Dame des Landes.
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logoFBconvergences

Message from the organizing team of the Convergence NDL 2014.
The next big rally against the National Ayraultport (Airport) project will take place at Notre Dame des Landes (NDL) on 5 and 6 July 2014. We want to make this gathering a festive time but certainly militant.
It will be to demonstrate that we are more determined than ever and massively mobilized with unfailing motivation against this totally unnecessary and against all GPII, against the devastation and grabbing agricultural land and biodiversity against a model of society imposed which does not suit us and leads us straight into the wall.
Along with the implementation of this gathering, we plan to organize the widest possible convergence NDL; with “caravans” (walking, bicycles, tractors, cars …), which would leave the main sites of struggle where the Great Unnecessary and Imposed Projects (GPII  - les Grands Projets Inutiles et Imposés) and converge to NDL (organizing information meetings, gatherings, meeting in urban and rural crossings on the route) to arrive at the final rally.
The principle of this action was approved by the Coordination of opponents (with more than 50 organizations) and meeting support committees January 18, 2014 Fay de Bretagne.
We therefore appeal to you to see the conditions to complete this action.
To contact the organizing team: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com
Blog dédié : http://convergencesNDL.over-blog.com
To organize the convergence this summer, the convergence group await the support committee representatives from 9am during St. Peter in order to make the first contact for some and especially present the project.
More info here

http://communiques-acipa.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/une-convergence-vers-notre-dame-des.html

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THORENS-GLIÈRES (Near the Alps)

Départ de la marche vers Notre-Dame-des-Landes

1.6.2014

Les marcheurs pour Notre-Dame-des-Landes sont partis hier en fin d’après-midi, en chantant. Les marcheurs pour Notre Dame des Landes s’apprêtent à partir en chanson.

http://www.ledauphine.com/haute-savoie/2014/05/31/depart-de-la-marche-vers-notre-dame-des-landes

 


Convergences 4 posters

 

 

Images of the posters from  http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/est.html 

Convergences 4 posters 2

 

 


 

convergencesNDL.over-blog.com

 

http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/

Publié le 19 Mai 2014
[Imperfect translation into English below].

TOGETHER to strengthen actions against the Great Unnecessary Imposed Projects (GPII) for the preservation of agricultural land and jobs, for a choice of society that no longer endangers biodiversity and future generations …

Let’s make the next big national rally against the airport project on 5 and 6 July 2014 a militant and festive time of sharing information!

TOGETHER we will demonstrate that we are more determined than ever and massively mobilized.

This convergence is an opportunity from local struggles, decentralized throughout the country, to popularize and unite these struggles.

It will result in different forms of action plans:

• “caravans” (walking, bicycles, tractors, cars …)
• meeting points, information
• meetings in cities and rural areas travelled through, on the way to get to the final rally on the grounds of Bellevue on July 4 at around 19:00 .

8 decentralized rallies are planned at the weekend of June 28 and 29 as well as 3 large gatherings on 2 and 3 July.

6 major routes will emerge from 1 June

More than 10 caravans with stages in their journey will stop in symbolic places of struggle.

A great movement, throughout France starts to denounce the “artificialisaiton” of farmland and major harmful projects.

All paths converge at Notre Dame des Landes and the big rally on 5 and 6 July 2014.

If you want to participate by joining a caravan :

the tabs on top you have different caravans (bike / foot or vehicle) with the path to find the one that suits you best. You can contact officials, register and get information by leaving your email or phone number.

If you cannot follow a caravan but want to participate ?

Join one of the largest gatherings offered in the area where you are. A number or email address is available for contact. You may also be able to take part in one or two stages, depending on your availability.

For more information, contact us: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com

The symbol of convergence: Walking stick

HISTORY OF THE STICK

On December 2, 1978, the peasants of Larzac ]. finished their work and come to Paris.
[Larzac was a 10 year struggle by farmers etc against a large government military camp. It was finally won, and the way it was carried out has been an inspiration to other social struggles, and civil disobedience, across France ever since.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutte_du_Larzac].

They took shepherd’s crooks, used by the shepherds on the Larzac plateau, and in an impressive silence, they advanced to the rhythm of the walking sticks hitting the tarmac rhythmically in front of many mobile guards who were waiting for them.

Published April 4, 2014

relays

Michel’s walking stick will be carried as a relay  (Michel is a veteran campaigner against the NDDL airport, and has resisted it for years. He endured a one month hunger strike a few years ago – fasting for longer than anyone else was able to).

In November 2013, Michel Tarin* wrote: “I will go with my walking stick, with me remaining strength and in non-violence, on this ground, and we will defend it,square meter by square meter! I will not use my stick to bash the police but, as when our friends from Larzac went up to Paris, we will make our sticks resonate on the lands of the ZAD our sticks on land ZAD to protect if from the the programmed rampage … “

In May 2014, while the convergence towards NDDL were being organised, Michel expresses the idea that each person should bring with them a walking stick that will resonate in all places visited on the way to the ZAD at Notre Dame des Landes.

We have taken up his idea and made the stick the symbol of our struggle.

Michel’s stick will be at the rally at Glières on 31st May, and will be carried, from hand to hand and from struggle and struggle to NDDL on the 4th July.

INSTRUCTIONS

Obtain, or make yourself, a walking stick.
Wood is recommended.
Engrave into the wood your name or nickname …your department … the date …

Take this stick to NDDL making it resonate through all the places of struggle you pass through.

You can also use it to support yourself and lean on.

If you are not going to NDDL, give your stick to someone else who will carry it on to the next step until it reaches its destination.

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http://convergencesndl.over-blog.com/

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In French:

ENSEMBLE pour renforcer les actions contre les Grands Projets Inutiles Imposés (GPII), pour la préservation des terres et des emplois agricoles, pour un autre choix de société qui ne mettrait plus en danger la biodiversité et l’avenir des générations futures…

Faisons du prochain grand rassemblement national contre le projet d’aéroport des 5 et 6 juillet 2014 un moment d’informations et d’échanges militant et festif !

Nous ferons ENSEMBLE la démonstration que nous restons plus que jamais déterminés et massivement mobilisés.

Cette convergence est l’occasion, à partir des luttes locales, décentralisées sur tout le territoire, de populariser et de fédérer ces luttes.

Elle se traduira par différentes formes d’actions déterminées:

• “caravanes” (à pied, vélos, tracteurs, voitures…)

• points de rencontre, d’information

• meetings dans les villes et campagnes traversées pour arriver au moment du rassemblement final sur les terres de Bellevue le 4 juillet vers 19h00.

8 rassemblements décentralisés sont envisagés au week end du 28 et 29 juin ainsi que3 grandes convergences les 2 et 3 juillet.

6 grands parcours se dessineront à partir du 1°Juin.

Plus de 10 caravanes avec des étapes s’arrêteront dans des lieux symboliques de luttes.

Un grand mouvement , à travers toute la France se met en marche pour dénoncer l’artificialisation des terres agricoles et les grands projets nuisibles.

Tous les chemins convergent vers Notre Dame des Landes et son grand rassemblement des 5 et 6 Juillet 2014.

Vous souhaitez y participer en rejoignant une caravanesur les onglets en haut vous avez les différentes caravanes (à vélo/à pied ou motorisées) avec les trajet pour trouver celle qui vous correspond le mieux. Vous avez un mail ou un numéro pour contacter les responsables, vous inscrire et obtenir des renseignements.

Vous ne pouvez pas suivre une caravane mais vous souhaitez participer? Rejoignez un des grands rassemblements proposés dans la région où vous êtes. Un numéro ou un mail est à disposition pour prendre contact. Vous pouvez aussi faire une ou deux étapes suivant vos disponibilités.

Pour toute information, contactez nous: convergencesnddl2014@gmail.com

Le symbole des convergences: Le Bâton

HISTOIRE DE BÂTON

2 décembre 1978, les paysans du Larzac finissent leur marche et arrivent à Paris.

Ils se sont appropriés le bâton des bergers du causse et, dans un silence impressionnant, ils avancent au rythme des bâtons qui frappent le bitume en cadence au devant des nombreux gardes mobiles qui les attendent.

Novembre 2013, Michel Tarin écrit : »J’irai avec mon bâton, avec les forces qui me restent et dans la non-violence, sur le terrain et nous le défendrons mètre carré par mètre carré ! Je n’utiliserai pas mon bâton pour cogner sur les forces de police mais, comme lorsque les copains du Larzac montaient à Paris, nous ferons résonner le chant de nos bâtons sur les terres de la ZAD pour les protéger du saccage programmé… »

Mai 2014, alors que s’organisent les convergences vers NDL, Michel émet l’idée que chaque personne apporte son bâton qui résonnera dans tous les lieux traversés jusqu’à la ZAD de NDL.

Nous avons repris son idée et fait du bâton le symbole de notre lutte.

Quant au bâton de Michel, il sera le 31 mai au rassemblement des Glières et sera rapporté, de mains en mains et de luttes en luttes, à NDL le 4 juillet.

NOTICE D’UTILISATION

Procurez-vous, fabriquez-vous un bâton de marche.

Le bois est recommandé. Méfiez-vous des contre-façons.

Gravez dans le bois votre nom ou surnom…votre département…la date…

Apportez ce bâton à NDL en le faisant résonner sur tous les lieux de lutte que vous traverserez.

Vous pouvez aussi vous en servir pour vous appuyer.

Si vous n’allez pas à NDL, confiez-le à une autre personne qui l’apportera jusqu’à l’étape suivante jusqu’à ce qu’il arrive à destination.

 

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Larzac marches – 1978

from Wikipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fight_for_the_Larzac

Paris marches

“More ingenious tactics were soon put in play. On 25 October 1974, a flock of 60 sheep were transported to Paris and set to grazing on the Champ de Mars, right under the Eiffel Tower. To inquiring gendarmes, the shepherds explained that it was publicity for Roquefort cheese.

Earlier, a protest march on Paris had been triggered by the signature of the decree of expropriation in the public interest, on 26 December 1972. The march began on the following 7 January, with stops at RodezSaint-FlourClermont-FerrandNevers and Orléans.[3] At each stop, marchers were welcomed and lodged by local committees. Meetings, rallies, and press conferences were organised.[14]

Police and local authorities were much less welcoming. The marchers were harassed at every stop-over. Finally, at Orléans, the procession was blocked by the CRS (French riot police) and their 26 tractors impounded. Bernard Lambert, leader of the Mouvement des Paysans Travailleurs (Working Peasant Movement), promptly arranged for the loan of 26 tractors belonging to farmers in the Orléans area, the CRS were outflanked, and the march proceeded to Paris.[3]

A second Paris march began on 2 December 1978. 18 Larzac farmers walked 710 km in 25 stages. The CRS blocked the centre of Paris, but 40,000 supporters rallied on the outskirts, making the largest demonstration of the year.”

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Acipa cow plane

 

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Gatwick claims that with better public transport it will be “road & rail ready” for 2nd runway by 2021

Gatwick has produced a glossy document setting out how it will have fantastic road and rail links in place by 2021, that there will be no road or rail congestion, and everyone will have smoother and easier journeys. And at no cost to anyone. There are some stunning omissions.  Most things that are inconvenient are just left out. They say “Gatwick will increase the cost efficiency in the rail industry by filling off-peak trains as well as providing passengers for trains operating in the opposite direction to peak commuter services. While it is estimated that, on the busiest trains, only 5% of travellers will be air passengers, the overall benefit they will bring will be around £3 billion in additional fare income.”  Gatwick says: “Junction 9 of the M23 … will need to be upgraded to cater for expansion. Gatwick has committed to funding a doubling of this motorway junction capacity.” The only thing Gatwick has said it will pay for.  Also: “we have re-designed the local road network to be no busier than it is today, even after a general increase in demand, which will lessen local noise and air quality effects of background traffic, benefit economic activity and the quality of life of those using and living along the affected roads.”  Really?  Who writes this stuff?
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This is the presentation by Julia Gregory, of Gatwick, at the RunwaysUK conference on surface access, on 2nd June 2014. Gatwick R2: Julia Gregory, Head of Airport Development, Gatwick Airport, and transport consultant Hugh Sumner


 

LONDON GATWICK “ROAD AND RAIL READY” FOR SECOND RUNWAY BY 2021

2nd June 2014  (Gatwick Airport’s website)

Unveiling Gatwick Airport’s public transport improvements, Hugh Sumner, the mastermind behind London 2012’s transport infrastructure, said Gatwick will be “road and rail ready” for a second runway by 2021, with no additional cost to the taxpayer.

DOWNLOAD THE ‘GATWICK TRANSFORMING’ DOCUMENT

[The document only contains 1½ pages of text, but is a marvel of bizarre and unsubstantiated claims and wishful thinking. Definitely worth a look. Read and marvel !]

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Transport improvements [none of which paid for by Gatwick - all funded by the tax payer]  include:

- A train to central London every 2.5 minutes by 2019
- Rail capacity doubled by 2020, and nearly trebled by 2035
- New Gatwick Express trains in service by 2016
- Quicker journey times to the West End and City, than from Heathrow
- 15 million people brought within 60 minutes of Gatwick – more than any UK airport
- 1000 rail stations within one change, including links to all UK main rail lines, Crossrail and HS2.
- Planned upgrades to M25 and M23, including smart motorway system

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A doubling of rail capacity by 2020 means 10,000 additional seats to the capital every hour, transforming rail services for both air passengers and local commuters. Other planned infrastructure improvements – such as Brighton Mainline re-signalling and junction replacements – will nearly treble capacity by 2035.  These increases in capacity will see more people using Gatwick’s rail station than Charing Cross mainline or Piccadilly Circus today.

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Hugh Sumner, senior transport advisor for London Gatwick said:

“Gatwick will be road and rail ready for a second runway by 2021 with no additional cost to the taxpayer. [?]  The ease at which these improvements can be delivered adds yet more weight to the obvious case for a new runway at Gatwick.

“Gatwick already has the highest proportion of passengers travelling by public transport and these improvements will help encourage even more. We want 60% of our customers to use public transport, comparable with the best globally and better than any UK airport.”

More connected

Gatwick is already the UK’s best connected airport by rail, but by 2020 it will connect directly to 175 mainline stations and 1000 with a single change.

This will make it quicker and easier for people to get to the airport, including those living further afield in towns north and west of London1.  For example, within 5 years, new direct services will link Gatwick to Cambridge and Peterborough, with further direct connections to cities like Oxford and to Milton Keynes also planned.

The improvements announced today will bring 15 million people – a quarter of the UK population – to within 60 minutes of Gatwick by 2019 – more than any other UK airport.

Jobs

A second runway at Gatwick would also generate 22,000 jobs in the local area and the improved public transport links would open these opportunities up to over 1 million living within 25 miles of Gatwick who live in the 20% most deprived communities in England.  These include areas along the south coast and in Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark and Hackney. [ie. they would have to commute to their jobs, using road or rail].

Brand new, faster trains

Capacity will be nearly doubled through new, longer and more frequent trains.  The first improvements will be new, high quality carriages designed for airline travellers on the dedicated non-stop Gatwick Express service to London Victoria in 2016.

Additional new trains will then be rolled out on Thameslink services through Gatwick to London Bridge, Blackfriars, Farringdon and St Pancras/ King’s Cross and beyond.

All these services will arrive in the heart of London faster than services from Heathrow, even after Crossrail is in operation.  Gatwick will link to Crossrail at Farringdon, HS2 at Old Oak Common and Crossrail 2 at Clapham Common in the future.  None of these links require additional investment, unlike the Heathrow’s aspirations to link to HS2.  [This means the taxpayer has already funded them, and Gatwick can get the benefit at no cost to itself].

More punctual, reliable and funded service

Major infrastructure improvements will also help to increase capacity and deliver a more punctual service.  These include new platforms at East Croydon and Redhill and new track to separate fast and slow trains, both helping to reduce bottlenecks, and better signalling technology on Brighton mainline to improve resilience and reliability.

Not only do the public transport improvements place no additional burden on the taxpayer, Gatwick customers would actually help to make them viable by generating £3bn in rail ticket sales each year, and by helping to fill trains in both directions off peak and in the opposite direction to commuters in peak periods.  [Which conveniently ignores the air passengers who are using the services at peak times, and increasing congestion and crowding].

Road

Access to Gatwick by road is already being improved, with a comprehensive upgrade programme for the lower half of the M25 and the M23 in place, including smart motorway use with hard shoulder running.

The airport will be road ready for any additional passengers by 2021 should a second runway be built.  The airport will also ensure that local road networks will be no busier than they are today, even after a general increase in demand.  [How exactly?] This contrasts to Heathrow’s already congested roads and the need to impose a congestion charge.

In the coming months, Gatwick will also announce detailed plans for Gatwick Gateway – which will be one of the world’s most efficient airport transport hubs, getting passengers from platform to all terminals in just 2 minutes. The Government has already committed £50 million to help build a new station at Gatwick.  [The government, not Gatwick].

The plans announced today formed part of Gatwick’s recent submission to the Airports Commission.

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Gatwick surface access 15 million people

One of the slides from Julia Gregory’s presentation:  others at  link 

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Gatwick faster than Heathrow

 And another, with a certain type of logic …..  map, which is intended to show that most of England, including areas far to the north, will have easier journeys to Gatwick than to Heathrow.  [How about cheap holiday flights also from Luton, Stansted,  Birmingham?]

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Key milestones in Gatwick’s public transport improvements:

2014

- Refurbishment of Platform 7, Gatwick Airport helping reduce delays
- Government awards Thameslink rail franchise, which will operate rail services to Gatwick from London and the South-East, to Govia.
- M25 improvements between junctions 5 and 7.
- Oyster Card and contactless payment introduced at Gatwick Airport

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2015

- Thameslink and Southern merge services under new Govia franchise.

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2016

- New, high quality trains introduced on the dedicated non-stop Gatwick Express service to London Victoria.

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2017

- Victoria Station improvements
- Redhill Station improvements, including new track and platform to reduce bottle necks on the line.

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2018

- New Thameslink trains in operation between Gatwick and London Bridge, Farringdon, St Pancras/ King’s Cross and beyond
- Introduction of longer, more frequent trains – moving from 14 peak hour trains from Gatwick to London to 18.

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2019

- Gatwick Airport Station redevelopment completed including new concourse.
- Controlled motorway improvements to M25 between junctions 7 and 8.

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2020

- Brighton Mainline re-signalling helping to improve reliability.
- New direct services introduced to Cambridge and Peterborough.

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2021

- Smart motorway improvements to M25 between junctions 8 and 10

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2030

- Up to 24 trains per peak an hour from Gatwick to London.
- Almost all trains leaving Gatwick made up of 12 carriages.

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By 2035

- Further improvements deliver nearly treble capacity from 2012 levels to 45,000 seats per peak hour

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About Gatwick Airport

Gatwick Airport is the UK’s second largest airport and the busiest single-runway airport in the world. It serves more than 200 destinations in 90 countries for around 35 million passengers a year on short- and long-haul point-to-point services. It is also a major economic driver for the South-East region, generating around 23,000 on-airport jobs and a further 13,000 jobs through related activities. The airport is 28 miles south of London with excellent public transport links, including the Gatwick Express.

Gatwick Airport is owned by a group of international investment funds, of which Global Infrastructure Partners is the largest shareholder.

 

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This is the main text of the glossy Gatwick leaflet:

EXISTING SCHEMES WILL BE A ROAD AND RAIL
REVOLUTION FOR GATWICK

Gatwick road and rail access will start transforming over the coming years through funded
schemes such as Thameslink. Passengers will start to see the benefits very quickly and progressive improvements will mean that Gatwick will be ‘second runway ready’ by road and rail by 2021 whatever the decision by the Davies Commission. By 2030 capacity and frequency of services will be better still.

- All improvements planned or funded requiring no additional taxpayer contribution

- New Gatwick Express trains in service

- Train to Central London every 2.5 minutes

- Gatwick’s rail capacity nearly tripled, frequency of trains doubled

- Directly connected to 175 stations and more than 1,000 stations with just one change

- Connected to every major rail upgrade including Crossrail and HS2

- Shorter journey times to the West End and The City than Heathrow

- No requirement to tunnel the M25, turn it into a 14-lane motorway, or introduce congestion charging.

 

RAIL: MORE CONNECTIONS,
MORE REACH, BETTER SERVICES

The transformation of Gatwick will provide people with higher quality services, to and from more places, allowing them to travel with greater ease.

Gatwick is well connected to the North, South, East and West and has a huge reach. 3.2 million people live within 30 minutes of the airport and all of London’s population and almost 15 million of the UK population lives within around 60 minutes.

Gatwick already offers direct rail services to 129 stations from Southampton, through London, to Bedford. By 2035, Gatwick’s rail capacity will be nearly tripled, with the frequency of trains almost doubled. There will soon be a train to Central London every 2.5 minutes and the overall journey time into the heart of London’s business district will be faster and more frequent than that from Heathrow, even after Crossrail is in operation.

The reach of rail services will be extended to serve 175 stations directly, including Oxford, Cambridge and Peterborough and more than 1,000 stations with one change. The dedicated non-stop Gatwick Express service will be transformed with brand new, high quality trains between London Victoria and the airport.

Not only is Gatwick well connected today, travel times to key destinations in London are shorter than other airports:

- Westminster and the West End through Victoria and the
Business District through London Bridge in 30 minutes;

- Crossrail at Farringdon, and international services at
St Pancras and King’s Cross in under 40 minutes;

- The financial services centre of Canary Wharf and
the South Bank at Waterloo in 40 minutes.

Journey times to and from the airport from within the UK will
be an average of around 60 minutes compared to Heathrow’s
70 minute average.

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“THE OVERALL JOURNEY TIME INTO
THE HEART OF LONDON’S BUSINESS
DISTRICT WILL BE FASTER AND
MORE FREQUENT THAN THAT FROM
HEATHROW, EVEN AFTER CROSSRAIL
IS IN OPERATION”
Gatwick will be an airport connected to and serving the whole nation.   Gatwick will connect to Crossrail at Farringdon — and the planned Crossrail2 at Clapham Junction — and HS2 services via Old Oak Common. The improved train networks mean that Gatwick is within one change of all the main UK inter-city rail lines, including:

- Great Western (Bristol, Wales and the South West);

- West Coast Mainline (Birmingham, Manchester, and Glasgow);

- Midland Mainline (Sheffield, Nottingham, and Derby);

- East Coast Mainline (Leeds, Newcastle, and Edinburgh).

Gatwick will increase the cost efficiency in the rail industry by filling off-peak trains as well as providing passengers for trains operating in the opposite direction to peak commuter services.
While it is estimated that, on the busiest trains, only five per cent of travellers will be air passengers, the overall benefit they will bring will be around £3 billion in additional fare income.

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ROADS: BETTER ACCESS,
LESS CONGESTION

Gatwick will help communities address highway junction and
other road improvements where growth will have an effect on
traffic demand Access to Gatwick Airport by road is already
being improved — a comprehensive upgrade programme for the
lower half of the M25 and the M23 is in place. Junction 9 of the
M23, however, will need to be upgraded to cater for expansion.
Gatwick has committed to funding a doubling of this motorway
junction capacity.

Where growth is predicted to have an effect on traffic demand, Gatwick will help communities with highway junction and road improvements where they are needed.

Similarly, we have re-designed the local road network to be no busier than it is today, even after a general increase in demand, which will lessen local noise and air quality effects of
background traffic, benefit economic activity and the quality of life of those using and living along the affected roads.

An airports system with a two-runway Gatwick and a two-runway Heathrow will disperse passengers over a much wider and extensive range of roads and railways resulting in less
congestion, more reliable and more comfortable journeys.

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BY 2019, THERE WILL BE A TRAIN TO
CENTRAL LONDON EVERY 2.5 MINUTES

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THE STATE-OF-THE-ART
GATWICK GATEWAY STATION

The new state-of-the-art Gatwick Gateway will create a single, simple and swift transport
interchange — a ‘front door’ serving the whole airport.

The new Gatwick Gateway will provide easy access to the heart of the airport. Because of
its easy-to-navigate layout, Gatwick will offer faster connections and a better experience for
passengers and staff whether they arrive by train, bus, car, bicycle, or on foot.

The airport has already undergone a significant transformation, and improvements already
planned mean it will take passengers only two minutes to move from the airport’s gateway to all terminals..

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SHARING THE BENEFITS

Expanding Gatwick would be best for the UK
economy as a whole. A second runway at
Gatwick will contribute to this rebalancing of
London’s economy, providing linkages and
connectivity to areas that have been earmarked
for regeneration or have capacity for growth
such as Croydon, Lewisham and Bromley.

Expansion at Gatwick would attract new
businesses creating an additional 120,000
jobs across London and the South East. Up
to 22,000 of these new jobs will be created
directly at the airport and the excellent rail
links will connect some of the most deprived
boroughs and towns in England to those jobs.

This will stimulate economic growth in these
locations – around one million people within
the 20% most deprived communities in the
South East live within 25 miles of Gatwick
— and help generate more balanced growth
across the region

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True and full costs on surface transport

. A slide from Michele Dix’s (from TfL) presentation   Link 

 

Potential trip growth on public transport and road

 

And another slide from Michele Dix, indicating the extra pressure on surface transport, at peak times, from another runway being allowed at Heathrow or Gatwick   Link 

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See also

Heathrow and Gatwick set out their rival claims at RunwaysUK conference on airport surface access

The organisation, RunwaysUK, which describes itself as a neutral platform for debate on the rival runway schemes, held an interesting and productive half day conference on surface access to airports. There were accounts by Heathrow, Gatwick, Heathrow Hub and the Thames estuary scheme proposers of their plans for road and rail access, as well as contributions by TfL, Network Rail and others with an interest. It is recognised that adding a runway in the south east would come with immense transport strains on existing transport infrastructure. In order to meet requirements on the amount of passengers (and staff) using the airport to be by public transport, the airports know they cannot depend on road access alone. The pressure of extra passengers on networks that are already stretched, especially at peak times, is recognised – though Gatwick and Heathrow do their best to say their passengers will add little, and merely make rail services more profitable out of peak hours. Vexed issues remain of how much the taxpayer pays for transport services the airports benefit from, and what the cost of added congestion to road and rail services – from millions of extra air passengers being added – would cost the economy.

Click here to view full story…

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See also:

Gatwick hopes its claim will be believed that area’s road network will ‘better than or the same’ with 2nd runway

Gatwick airport’s publicity machine is saying the area’s road network would be left ‘better than or the same’ if a second runway was built at Gatwick. It is claiming its planned infrastructure improvements will make it ‘road and rail ready’ by 2021 for a new runway. And “with no additional cost to the taxpayer.” They want to “create a regional transport hub to help drive economic growth across the entire area.” Works on a new junction on the A24 are due to start now and could last 18 months, while roadworks have been ongoing on the A23 near Handcross since 2011. Gatwick’s spokesman, Hugh Sumner, said of the local road network’s ability to cope with any additional strain: “Our commitment is we are going to leave the road systems working better than or the same in 2050.” But the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC), which opposes a 2nd runway, questioned the contents of the transport document. Brendon Sewill, chair of GACC, said: “The document published by [Gatwick Airport Limited] contains 10% inaccuracies, 20% inconsistencies, and 50% wishful thinking.” TfL appreciate the huge strain a new Gatwick runway will place on surface transport networks, which Gatwick is attempting to gloss over.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=21833


 

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Level playing field on transport costs vital to proper assessment of runway options – says TfL

10.6.2014

By contrast to the Gatwick spin, above, figures from Transport for London (TfL) paint a different picture. The issue of surface access to airports was the subject of the RunwaysUK conference on 2nd June. Michèle Dix, planning director of Transport for London, said that the costs for surface access for each of the runway options must be assessed against a level playing field of criteria.

Michèle said it was vital that estimates by runway promoters reflected that actual needs of transport in the capital. “You need to compare like with like. What are the true and full costs of accommodating this additional demand? If airports are placing a greater demand on the network then we need a greater transport provision.”

TfL predictions are that the extra demand, due to Gatwick, at peak times (per hour) would be 6,800 extra using public transport, and 5,500 extra by road if Gatwick filled a second runway The extra demand, due to Heathrow,  at peak times would be 9,200 extra using public transport and 7,500 extra by road if Heathrow filled a 3rd runway.

TfL estimated that comparable “optimal” investment level of investment needed – the total package of transport schemes required to deliver an optimal level of surface transport access – for Heathrow was £17.6bn, Gatwick £12.4bn (and an Inner Thames Estuary airport £19.1bn).  10.6.2014

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=21781

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Read more »

Heathrow and Gatwick set out their rival claims at RunwaysUK conference on airport surface access

The organisation, RunwaysUK, which describes itself as a neutral platform for debate on the rival runway schemes, held an interesting and productive half day conference on surface access to airports.There were accounts by Heathrow, Gatwick, Heathrow Hub and the Thames estuary scheme proposers of their plans for road and rail access, as well as contributions by TfL, Network Rail and others with an interest. It is recognised that adding a runway in the south east would come with immense transport strains on existing transport infrastructure. In order to meet requirements on the amount of passengers (and staff) using the airport to be by public transport, the airports know they cannot depend on road access alone. The pressure of extra passengers on networks that are already stretched, especially at peak times, is recognised – though Gatwick and Heathrow do their best to say their passengers will add little, and merely make rail services more profitable out of peak hours. Vexed issues remain of how much the taxpayer pays for transport services the airports benefit from, and what the cost of added congestion to road and rail services – from millions of extra air passengers being added – would cost the economy.
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These are the speaker presentations from the conference

View speaker presentations here.

And other Post-Show resources  


Surface access challenges for new UK runway hotly debated

by  

3.6.2014 (Airport World)

Surface access challenges for new UK runway hotly debated

Ambitious road and rail projects were revealed yesterday to cope with the challenges faced in providing transport systems to service the Airports Commission’s proposals for increasing the UK’s aviation capacity.

Transportation links into Heathrow, Gatwick, and a possible new Estuary Airport were debated at the Runways UK Surface Access conference at Pinsent Masons in London.

The Airports Commission has shortlisted three options to increase aviation runway capacity in the UK: a third runway to the northwest at Heathrow; the extension of a runway at Heathrow proposed by the independent Heathrow Hub group; a second runway at London Gatwick, while it will make a decision shortly on whether to add the multi-billion Estuary Airport to the list.

The first keynote speaker, Michael Schabas, from FCP, outlined his view on any expansion decision: “Connectivity is really important, followed by frequency, reliability, speed, and price,” he says.

In his view, London can learn about surface access from the Frankfurt inter-city transport links: “You can go almost anywhere in Germany on a train from Frankfurt Airport – an interesting example for London.”

He warned the UK not to make the same ‘big mistake’ made in Shanghai, China, where separate domestic and international airports were built on each side of the city.

Schabas told delegates he believes the Piccadilly line loop link with T4 at Heathrow was a ‘mistake’ and thinks it may be scrapped in the future.

He did appear to support a new runway at Heathrow, as highlighted it was in the right place for expansion, due to its location and links into London, and proximity to rail links and motorways, and the six million that use the Piccadilly line to get there.

Any new runway in the UK will have a huge impact on the Transport for London (Tfl) network, and managing director of planning and transport for Tfl, Michele Dix, says it is already crowded.

“Come 2031 even with all this committed schemes it is crowded on the underground and roads. We are playing catch-up at Tfl with the growth in London.

“There is substantial crowding in the future at peak hours even with planned improvements,” Dix explains.

tranny12

Improved rail links to cope with the influx of more passengers resulting from the building of any new runway is seen as essential for making sure surface access is efficient.

Network Rail strategy and planning director, Paul Harwood, told delegates new runways at Gatwick and Heathrow, would increase use on the rail network by 6% at peak times.

“Both Heathrow and Gatwick would contribute a relatively small proportion of demand into London in the morning peak, but expansion at either are not peak hour game-changers,” he says.

Harwood says any airport expansion should be considered as a contributor to growth, and Network Rail is yet to assess the impact of the proposed Estuary Airport.

In his briefing, Airports Commission Secretariat Oliver Mulvey, highlighted the importance the quality of surface access, and says the commission considering ‘speed, cost and reliability’.

“For each option shortlisted, we will look at how good access to London is, across the South East and the regions,” Mulvey explains.

Any of the runway projects, he notes need to the balance the needs of commuters, airport passengers and freight use in their surface access strategy.

Mulvey explains the commission will undergo an intensive summer appraisal of all the shortlisted options, before a national consultation on each from around October time.

As for the Estuary Airport proposal, he says four feasibility studies have been carried out, including one on surface transport, and all the studies will be published for comment in July.

The commission will make a decision on the Boris Johnson championed new hub on the Isle of Grain in Kent in August, or September, and Mulvey says, if it is shortlisted it could push back their timetable.

In his presentation on the Estuary Airport, Huw Thomas, a partner at Foster + Partners, architect for the project, explains it would have a transportation hub, servicing all transport modes.

Among proposals, Thomas says are construction of a Lower Thames bridge crossing linking Kent and Essex by rail and road, while rail links are a key part of the plans, as it connects the ‘crisis of increased population in the east of London’ and to routes for economic needs.

Thomas says the integrated transportation hub, would be similar to Hong Kong International Airport: “Downtown check-in is critical and a key of how an airport functions. Passengers would be able to drop bags off at the transport hub on arrival, which would go direct to gates,” he explains.

Thomas believes a long-term decision must be made by the commission as expansion affects generations of the future.

Gattran 

Gatwick’s propsed Gatwick Gateway

As part of London Gatwick’s plans for a second runway, is a new single transportation centre Gatwick Gateway, which would handle all transportation arrivals.

Head of airport development, Julia Gregory, told delegates that ‘maximising’ public transport was a key part of the strategy, and it hopes 60% passengers will arrive by public transport, by 2040.

The M25 and M23 would also be improved, including the doubling of capacity at Junction 9 of the M23, while coach and bus links would be ramped up.

Gregory says the Gatwick Gateway is deliverable by 2021: “15 million people would be within 60 minutes of Gatwick, and one million people within 25 miles.”

Gatwick says by 2019 there will be a train to London every 2.5 minutes, rail capacity will be doubled by 2020, nearly trebled by 2035, and 1000 rail stations will be within one change.

Heathtran

Heathrow’s planned transportation hub

Heathrow Airport head of surface access strategy, Simon Earles, then told delegates improving surface access is a key part of the gateway’s runway proposal, and one transportation hub is planned as part of the restructuring project – which would feature a Heathrow West and Heathrow East.

Part of Heathrow’s plans are a western rail link and a southern rail link, that Earles describes as the ‘missing link’ in the network, and he says by 2030 the number of trains to Heathrow would double, and the number of seats tripled, by increasing capacity on all services.

If a third runway is built, modifications would be made to the M4, and M25, including the building of a 650 metre tunnel for the M25.

The centre of the independent Heathrow Hub group’s surface access plans, is a Heathrow Hub Station interchange to the north of the airport, including a passenger bag drop with links to all terminals.

Director Mike Bostock, urges an integrated approach to surface access, including new a rail link to the south, and a link with the proposed HS2, and also told delegates if Heathrow is expanded, it should be planned with a fourth runway in mind.

The Airports Commission led by Sir Howard Davies will give its final recommendations to the government after next May’s general election.

http://www.airport-world.com/home/general-news/item/4049-surface-access-challenges-for-new-uk-runway-hotly-debated


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True and full costs on surface transport

. A slide from Michele Dix’s (from TfL) presentation   Link 

 

Potential trip growth on public transport and road

 

And another slide from Michele Dix, indicating the extra pressure on surface transport, at peak times, from another runway being allowed at Heathrow or Gatwick   Link 

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Heathrow and Gatwick step up battle for new runway

Leaders of Heathrow and Gatwick’s bids to argue they have best infrastructure to cope with extra travellers at industry event on Monday

Heathrow and Gatwick will step up their battle over the right to build Britain’s next runway on Monday as bosses try to persuade policymakers that they will have the best infrastructure to cope with extra travellers.

Leaders of Gatwick’s bid will claim at an industry event in London that Britain’s second largest airport will be “road and rail ready” for a second runway by 2021 – at no additional cost to the taxpayer.

A £6.5bn government-sponsored Thameslink programme linking the airport to Greater London and the South East is already underway. Bosses will say plans to build transport links to support a second runway at the West Sussex airport by 2025 will require no additional taxpayer funding.

Hugh Sumner, the airport’s senior transport adviser, said new Gatwick Express trains by 2016 would help to double rail capacity before the end of the decade, and treble it by 2035.

“Not only is the second runway at Gatwick the optimal thing for the nation and economy, but beneath that, getting better access to and from Gatwick will be in place well before a second runway happens,” he said. “Not only will Gatwick not need a public subsidy for [this], but it will generate about £3bn back to the taxpayer in terms of increased rail revenues.”

Heathrow bosses will also lay out plans to beef-up transport links to Europe’s busiest airport. Heathrow wants to treble rail capacity to 15,000 seats per hour by 2030, meaning more than 70pc of the UK will be within three hours of the airport if it builds a third runway.

Heathrow is already the UK’s best connected transport hub,” said Simon Earles, head of surface access at Heathrow. “It is in a better geographical location for most UK passengers and companies than other options for airport expansion.”

According to Heathrow, new rail links will slash journey times to and from the airport. It claims journey times to Leeds would be cut by more than half to just 1 hour 40 mins, while travelling to Birmingham would take just under an hour.

The Airports Commission, led by Sir Howard Davies, has short-listed three options for a new runway in the South East of England to enable Britain to keep up with aviation capacity demands.

Two options have been shortlisted at Heathrow: a third runway to the north west of the airport or the creation of a “Heathrow Hub” that would involve extending the airport’s existing north runway to 6km and dividing it in two. Sir Howard believes it will be possible to build an additional Heathrow runway by 2026. A second runway at Gatwick is the other option.

Mr Sumner described a second Gatwick runway as the most efficient option. “Two plus two is the right thing for the nation,” he said. Gatwick claims it will be able to get holidaymakers from its internal rail platforms to all terminals in just two minutes. “We can save the consumer time getting getting to and from the airport, time within the airport and time taxiing,” said Mr Sumner.

Sir Howard is due to give his final recommendation to the Government in 2015.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/transport/10868774/Heathrow-and-Gatwick-step-up-battle-for-new-runway.html

 


 


New Civil       Engineer

 

Gatwick sets out road and rail case for expansion

2 June, 2014

 

By Greg Pitcher (NCE)

 

Gatwick has emphasised the road and rail improvements that will leave it ready for a second runwa

The Sussex airport released a document showing that trains would leave for central London every two and a half minutes by 2019, with overall rail capacity from Gatwick doubled from now to 2020.

It added that road and rail upgrades already planned by the government would allow a second runway to be built without any additional surface access expenditure for the taxpayer.

Gatwick, Heathrow and a new inner Thames Estuary airport are competing for permission to provide extra air capacity in the South East.

Hugh Sumner, senior transport advisor for London Gatwick, said: “Gatwick will be road and rail ready for a second runway by 2021 with no additional cost to the taxpayer. The ease at which these improvements can be delivered adds yet more weight to the obvious case for a new runway at Gatwick.

“Gatwick already has the highest proportion of passengers travelling by public transport and these improvements will help encourage even more. We want 60% of our customers to use public transport, comparable with the best globally and better than any UK airport.”
http://www.nce.co.uk/gatwick-sets-out-road-and-rail-case-for-expansion/8663437.article

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RunwaysUK says they are a:  “neutral platform for scheme debate.” http://www.runwaysuk.com/ruk/about-runways-uk

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Runways UK conference agenda:

Runways UK: Airport Infrastructure for a Future Britain

RUK Surface Access Programme

http://www.runwaysuk.com/surface/programme

 

14.30

INTRODUCTION AND WELCOME

14:30 Event Moderator: Antony Oliver, Editor, Infrastructure Intelligence

14.35

KEYNOTES

14:35 Michael Schabas, Partner, FCP

Passenger satisfaction, sustainability and economics are driving significant developments in surface access systems to and from airports around the world. Michael provides a round up of best global practice and how the lessons learnt can be applied to the UK airport capacity debate.

14:50 Michèle Dix, Managing Director of Planning, Transport for London

Michèle will offer an explanation of the surveyed/predicted airport passenger journeys, passenger growth and the influence of demographic change and modal shift on these figures; together with an overview of how TfL has assessed the modifications and additions that will be needed to the current public transport systems for each of the potential schemes

15.05

NETWORK RAIL’S PLANNING PROPOSALS FOR THE OPTIONS

Paul Harwood, strategy and planning director, Network Rail

Explanation of Network Rail’s assessment of how to link the national rail system (local and intercity) to each the four airport options, both ‘short term’ improvements, and the long-term including the predicted growth in passenger numbers over these periods; the integration of the national rail network with the transports systems of TfL together providing the transport to the airports; how well these systems will provide for the needs of people living and working within London, across the whole of the UK and visitors travelling to both London the rest of the UK and the freight needs.

15.20

AIRPORTS COMMISSION PROCESS

Oliver Mulvey, Airports Commission Secretariat

How the Airports Commission is appraising the surface access elements of the short-listed proposals.

15.35

Q&A SESSION

15.45

SURFACE ACCESS PROPOSITIONS FROM THE AIRPORTS COMMISSION’S OPTION PROMOTERS

Each presenter will set out what their latest proposals for surface access provisions for their schemes. They will explain how well they see these proposals satisfying the passenger and freight demand and the way they see these proposals being implemented. They will detail what surface transport infrastructure costs are included in their cost estimates and what costs are not included; and what costs will be paid for by the Airport and what costs are expected to be paid for from the public purse.

15:45 The Estuary: Huw Thomas, Partner, Foster + Partners

Explanation of the plans to link The Estuary Airport to London and to the rest of the UK in terms of highways (car, bus, coach) and rail; stating the proportion of passengers expected to travel by public transport as opposed to car by 2030 and 2050; the airport capacity (passenger and freight) being used; any ‘high speed rail’ links with the travel times for these; any plans for ‘park and ride’ with luggage facilities and any plans for a new lower Thames crossing.

16.00

COFFEE AND NETWORKING

16.20

SURFACE ACCESS PROPOSITIONS FROM THE AIRPORTS COMMISSION’S OPTION PROMOTERS

16:20 Gatwick Airport: Julia Gregory, Head of Airport Development, Gatwick Airport, and transport consultant Hugh Sumner

Explanation of short term and long term plans to link a new expanded Gatwick airport to London and to the rest of the UK in terms of both highways and rail. Our speakers will set out what proportion of passengers are predicted to travel by public transport rather than car by 2030 and 2050; how this matches the airport’s predicted passenger and freight capacity; how the ‘Gatwick Express’ links to the national rail network and the local London networks of Network Rail and TfL; and any plans to link Gatwick Airport by rail to the other London airports.

16:35 Heathrow Airport: Simon Earles, Head of Surface Access Strategy, Heathrow Airport

Explanation of the infrastructure modifications (including the M25 and the M4) to accommodate the additional runway proposal; future increase in highway traffic due to increased airport capacity; the airport capacity (passenger and freight) being used in the proposal; plans to improve the public transport links to London and to the rest of the UK; the proportion of passengers predicted to travel to the airport by public transport rather than car by 2030 and 2050; the allowance in the plans, if any, for the maintenance or replacement of  the vital elevated M4 link into London.

16:50 Heathrow Hub: Mark Bostock, Director, Heathrow Hub

Explanation of the infrastructure modifications (including the M25 and the M4) to accommodate the additional runway proposal; future increase in highway traffic due to increased airport capacity; the airport capacity being used in the proposal; the principles of the ‘Hub’, the ‘interchange’, and how it works in surface access terms, both highways and rail; the proportion of passengers expected to travel to the airport by public transport rather than car by 2030 and 2050; the allowance in the plans, if any, for the maintenance or replacement of  the vital elevated M4 link into London.

17.05

Q&A SESSIONS

17:05 Panel Q&A

Chris Welsh, director of Global and European policy, Freight Transport Association

Tony Burton, founder, Civic Voice

Michael Schabas, partner, FCP

17:30 Delegate Q&A

17.45

CLOSING REMARKS, REFLECTIONS AND OBSERVATIONS

17:45 Steve Norris in conversation with Antony Oliver

18:05 Close

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Runways UK’s surface access event is centred around the challenge of providing the transport systems to service the Airports Commission’s proposals for increasing the UK’s aviation capacity.

For many years people travelled to and from airports chiefly by road, car, taxi or bus. Increasingly, they now travel on some form of rail transport and Government policy is to increase the use of sustainable transport to access airports for both passengers and staff.

For any airport, the core access questions are the same: where do people want to get to when they land at the airport; where do people leave from to get to the airport; and what is the quickest and most reliable way to get them there?

RUK Surface Access, which takes place on 2 June in central London, is the place to learn of the challenges and opportunities from the promoters of the schemes still in the running to be the Airport’s Commission’s recommended option; namely Heathrow R3, Heathrow Hub, Gatwick second runway and an Estuary scheme.

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New airport planned at Chinchero close to Machu Picchu to bring in ever more tourists

Machu Picchu is one of the world’s great spectacles, and the numbers of tourists visiting it has risen – 2.3 million in 2011.  Now the existing airport of Cusco Velazco Astete is said to be filling up, so another larger airport is planned, at nearby Chinchero. The plan is for a 4,000 metre runway, able to cater for planes as large as the A380.  Construction of a new airport is going ahead despite local concerns over corruption and the environmental impacts such a large project could have on the delicate mountaintop ecosystem of Peru’s Sacred Valley. The Peruvian president backs the project, with claims it will boost tourism, create jobs and permit modernization.  The new airport’s detractors say that sort of tourist volume is more than the region can handle sustainably. At Machu Picchu, the Peruvian Ministry of Tourism. Officials already limit the number of visitors to 3,500 people daily in order to satisfy UNESCO, which has designated the ruins a World Heritage Site. They fear the new airport will destroy the things the tourists have come to see. Others wonder what the effect might be on Lima if it gets by-passed. The airport might be open by 2017. 


 

Machu Picchu Airport Plan Stirs Concerns In Peru

By Paul Brady

20.2.2013

Map showing location of Chinchero and Cuzco

and there is a short video ( 4 minutes) which starts with great images of the area – and then ends with huge airport infrastructure superimposed on it, by virtual images).  Link

Construction of a new airport near the famed ruins of Machu Picchu is going ahead despite local concerns over corruption and the environmental impacts such a large project could have on the delicate mountaintop ecosystem of Peru’s Sacred Valley.

Planned for Chinchero, between Machu Picchu and Cusco, the new airport has the blessing of Peruvian President Ollanta Humala, who says the $460 million project will boost tourism, create jobs and “permit modernization,” The Telegraph reports.

The current Cusco airport, Alejandro Velasco Astete International Airport, “only operates with limited daytime flights,” The Telegraph reported in 2012, “and is limited by its location in a city, surrounded by hills. Large aircraft cannot fly into the facility.”

An atmospheric video introducing new airport, which would be named Chinchero-Cusco International Airport, suggest that it would be able to accommodate Airbus A380 and Boeing 757 aircraft, both of which can seat hundreds of passengers.

The new airport’s detractors say that sort of tourist volume is more than the region can handle sustainably, citing an already overwhelming number of arrivals to Cusco and other Sacred Valley towns.

At Machu Picchu, arrivals have surged from 1.7 million in 2010 to 2.3 million in 2011, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Tourism. Officials already limit the number of visitors allowed into the Machu Picchu site to 3,500 people daily in order to satisfy UNESCO, which has designated the ruins a World Heritage Site.

But the problems with the new Chinchero airport don’t end with the sheer number of arrivals, writes journalist Nicholas Asheshov. “The airport is not even needed, even if it were to be, in the words of Roger Valencia, Cusco’s top guide and thoughtful ecologist, ‘properly managed.’”

Asheshov wrote in an article in the Peruvian magazineCaretas. “But, again, as everyone here knows, it will be badly done. The quality of the regional and municipal administrations of Cusco and Urubamba, of which Chinchero is a district, is Third World incompetent with a well-entrenched tradition of corruption.”

Asheshov and other locals in the tourism industry worry that making it easier for tourists to get here will only destroy the things they’ve come to see. “The Sacred Valley has become a conurbation of million-dollar maize fields among the hotels,” Asheshov writes.

Others in the tourism industry wonder what the effect might be on Lima and its attractions, if passengers bypass the Peruvian capital in favor of a direct flight to Machu Picchu and its surrounding tourism bounty.

Peruvian news reports suggest the new airport could be open for business by 2017.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/20/cusco-peru-planning-new-airport_n_2695787.html

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Three Consortia Submit Bids for Chinchero Airport Contract

23.4.2014 (Peruvian Times)

Three consortia submitted proposals on Tuesday to build and operate a new international airport in Peru’s southern Andean region of Cusco.

The 40-year contract to build and operate the airport in the sleepy town of Chinchero is to be awarded on Friday by private investment promotion agency ProInversion. The initial cost of the project is estimated to be around $539 million, but the investment could rise to $658, depending on expansions and other works, ProInversion said in a statement.

The consortia —Aeropuerto Chinchero, Kuntur Wasi and Aeroportuario Imperial— submitted their technical and economic proposals for the contract.

ProInversion reported that the Aeropuerto Chinchero consortium is made up of construction company Grana y Montero SA, and the French-based Vinci Airports SAS and Vinci Concessions SAS (Vinci Airports is also bidding for the Santiago de Chile airport). The consortium Kuntur Wasi includes the Argentine firm Corporacion America SA and Andino Investment Holding SA of Peru, which in 2011 won the bid to operate and maintain six airports in southern Peru. The third consoritum is Aeroportuario Imperial is made up of Grupo Odinsa SA of Colombia and Mota Engil Peru SA of Portugal.

The airport will be built in the district of Chinchero, which is home to a community of about 12,000 people, Quechua-speaking farmers with rich, world-recognized traditions in textile weaving. The airport is to replace Cusco’s current airport, which is located in the city of Cusco about 35 kms away.  Chinchero likes at 3780 meters above sea level (12,400 ft) whereas the current airpot is several hundred feet lower, at 11,200 ft.

Plans to build an airport at Chinchero, to expand facilities for the now hundreds of thousands tourists that visit the nearby Machu Picchu ruins every year, has been on the drawing board since the early 1970s.

Critics of the Chinchero airport project say that it is a poorly devised plan that will destroy the historical town and the stunning landscapes of the surrounding valley, while also posing serious technical problems due to wind and fog factors as well as its higher altitude than the current Cusco airport.

http://www.peruviantimes.com/23/three-consortia-submit-bids-for-chinchero-airport-contract/22020/

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Machu Picchu: Peru unveils plans for new airport

23.8.2012 (BBC)

Peru’s President Ollanta Humala has unveiled plans for a new airport near Cusco which he says will boost tourism to the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu and the surrounding region.

The current airport, which is only able to handle limited daytime flights, was not sufficient, Mr Humala said.

The government will invest $460m (£290m) in the project, he said.

Machu Picchu is Peru’s top tourist attraction but there are concerns over the impact of high visitor numbers.

“This new airport will not only mean more tourists will be able to come, but it will generate more jobs… and help surrounding communities,” President Humala said.

At a ceremony on Wednesday, he enacted a law that allows the expropriation of land in the town of Chinchero where the new international airport would be built.

The investment would help the government to tackle poverty, he said, “while always respecting ancient culture”.

Tourism is the main source of income in the region.

Machu Picchu is a world heritage site and the UN’s cultural agency, Unesco, has previously warned about uncontrolled access and urged the authorities to make conservation a priority.

Currently, entrance to Machu Picchu is limited to some 2,500 visitors a day, amid concerns about the impact on the environment and citadel.

Cusco is the main starting point for visitors wishing to visit the site, who can make the 112km (70 mile) journey either on foot or via bus and train.

The citadel of Machu Picchu, located 2,500m (8,200ft) above sea level, was built in the 15th Century by the Incas.

It was rediscovered in 1911 by US historian Hiram Bingham.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-19353660

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Chinchero Cusco International Airport

City   Cuzco
Country   Peru
Existing Airport    Cusco Velazco Astete Airport
Other airports serving Cuzco     Cusco Velazco Astete Airport
Runways    4000m
Owner/Investment     T.B.A
Investment (US$ mill)    658,000,000  
Terminal Size     40000m²
Annual throughput     5,000,000
Target completion date     2019-12-31

Chinchero Cusco International Airport is an airport project located near Cusco, Peru. The airport is being constructed as demand for nearby Velasco Astete Airport has steadily increased.

Peru’s Minister of Transport and Communications stated construction of Chinchero Cusco International Airport would commence in 2013. The estimated (initial) investment amount was USD420 million, later increased to USD500 million. The comprehensive project involves the design, construction, financing, administration, operation, maintenance and exploitation of the New Chinchero-Cusco International Airport. This  concession, with a term of 30 or 40 years, will be self-sustaining. The estimated award date is 4Q2013. Recently,  Macchu Picchu (Cusco) became one of the new seven wonders of the world, and is currently one of the most important cultural destination worldwide (1.5 million visitors per year). The government will close down the exisiting airport (Velasco Astete) once this project is completed in four to five years. Reports suggest interest from 16 interested groups containing 27 firms, who may invest up to USD2-3 billion in the project, more then four times the anticipated amount.

Sep-2013.  The construction and operation concession award has  been delayed to “1H2014″, according to Deputy Transport Minister Alejandro Chang.There are a number of studies, including feasibility, which must be approved.

Feb-2014. The construction and operation tender is reportedly attracting interest from seven unnamed parties, while the project is expected to require a USD539 million investment which could rise to USD658 million with future expansion. The concession is expected to be awarded in Feb-2014.

The construction and operation tender award will be postponed from 28-Feb-2014 to 25-Apr-2014, due to a delay in relocating power lines at the future airport’s site. Bidders which have pre-qualified for the project will be known before then, and the list of bidders and final concession contract is expected to be presented to Peru’s Comptroller General in early Mar-2014. Consortia may be modified until 08-Apr-2014.

Mar-2014. The airport stated its construction and concession timetable will not be changed and the dates for submission of technical and economic studies by bidders and the award of the concession remain 22-Apr-2014 and 25-Apr-2014, respectively, as confirmed by Peru’s investment promotion agency ProInversion. The project will required an initial USD538 million investment, increasing to USD658 million with the inclusion of further renovations once the airport begins operations.

The Transport Ministry confirmed the construction and operation concession will be awarded 25-Apr-2014 “without further delay”. The Ministry plans to ensure “all obstacles” to the construction of the facility on the proposed site are relocated before construction begins. As previously reported the project will require an initial USD538 million investment, which increases to USD658 million when including further renovations once operations begin, and is expected to be complete by 2018 or 2019.

Apr-2014. The airport will have capacity for up to five million passengers p/a once its construction is complete, and up to eight million passengers p/a in the “long term”, according to Peru’s Minister of Transport and Communications Carlos Paredes.

Chinchero Cusco International Airport (AICC) received technical proposals from three consortiums for its construction tender. Seven pre-qualified bidders submitted applications.

Construction works will include a 40,000sqm terminal building and 4000m runway, as well as general and commercial aviation aprons and taxiways, as confirmed by Peru’s Transport Ministry. The terminal will have capacity for 4.5 million passengers p/a with possible further expansion to 5.7 million passengers p/a. Construction is expected to commence in the coming months once wells and reservoirs are relocated and engineering studies are completed, though no exact date was specified. The airport’s 40-year construction and operation concession was awarded to the Kuntur Wasi consortium of Argentina‘s Corporacion America and Peru’s Andino Investment Holding, who will invest USD538 million to bring the project online, which could increase to a USD658 million investment once further expansion is included.

http://centreforaviation.com/profiles/newairports/chinchero-cusco-international-airport

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February 11, 2014

http://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/blessing-or-curse-chinchero-airport

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There are pressures for those wanting jobs and economic development to back the airport.  Link claiming those against it want to keep the south of Peru poor.


 

By Nicholas Asheshov

✐ OP-ED Special to the Peruvian Times ☄

From some dusty official shelf, the burghers of Cusco have created a billion-dollar nightmare,  the Chinchero airport.

Thousands of tourists travel every day across this patchwork kaleidoscope of thousands of rolling acres of ancient potato and quinoa fields and grazing land, with oxen-drawn ploughs attended by Quechua family groups.   The tourists are on their way to Machu Picchu and already they are absorbing the medieval mystery of a great, little-known civilization.   They are in the cloud kingdom of the Incas.

Chincheros landscape Cusco-2It is a great sight. The Chinchero massif is dominated by a jewel of a colonial church atop an Inca palazzo and terraces, with an Indian town below that was the setting for Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper’s 1971  classic “The Last Great Picture Show”.

Indian weavers and their agriculturalist menfolk are today’s inheritors of a two thousand year  tradition.

This will all be destroyed the day the bulldozers and dump trucks move in, watched by the sad, bleak snow peaks, a few miles away, of the cordilleras above Machu Picchu .   The inhabitants of Chinchero know it.  Everyone in Cusco knows it.  Most of them know, too, that the airport is not even needed, even if it were to be, in the words of Roger Valencia, Cusco’s top guide and thoughtful ecologist, “properly managed.”

But, again, as everyone here knows, it will be badly done.  The quality of the regional and municipal administrations of Cusco and Urubamba, of which Chinchero is a district, is Third World incompetent with a well-entrenched tradition of corruption.  It is not for lack of cash, though.  Cusco gets more than a billion  dollars just from Camisea gas royalties, and much more these days from tourism, which is booming.

But the crowded roads are thin and poorly designed.  All three of the heavy-duty bridges into the Valle Sagrado have collapsed.  The Vilcanota River leaves an embarrassing flotsam of plastic, raw sewage and chemicals as it surges through deep canyons past silent stone terraces on its way to Machu Picchu.  The previous President of the Cusco Region is in jail for theft and today’s Mayor of Urubamba was thrown out by the authorities for corruption, and then promptly re-elected.

Forget the Ministry of Culture, the former Instituto Nacional de Cultura, whose Cusco office is a 3,000-strong gorilla.  The Environment Ministry is just a butterfly flapping its wings, here as elsewhere in the country.  These are the people who have encouraged the runaway growth of the illegal slum of   Machu Picchu pueblo,  Aguas Calientes, home to carpet-baggers and scalpers.

The INC has, even worse, overseen the virtual destruction of Ollantaytambo. This once noble stone-built Inca town has been a screaming traffic jam of tourist buses and heavy trucks since Perurail was allowed to turn the tiny country station into its terminus for the million tourists it takes to Machu Picchu, 25 miles down valley.

The Sacred Valley has become a conurbation of million-dollar maize fields among the hotels and weekend dachas.

The World Bank and the Finnish government have washed their hands of their Save the Vilcanota and Save Machu Picchu projects.

As if it mattered, the airport is a sleazy financial disaster for nearly all the 12,000 inhabitants of Chinchero, most of whom are Quechua-speaking comuneros. In a deal that was quietly railroaded through at the turn of the year, S/.138mn ($56mn) was handed to a  group of under three percent of  Chinchero’s inhabitants.

That’s it. That is what Chinchero will receive for being destroyed.   The scheme is so badly designed that this cash  S/.138mn has gone to just 426 people, the ones who happen to own the 350 hectares, out of the district’s 70,000, where the airstrip is to be laid.

This is the comunidad of Yanacona which, a couple of days after the money from the Regional Government was received,  was taken over by Humberto Huaman, who won by 326 against 325 votes.  Humberto had just been sentenced to four years’ jail, suspended, for problems when he was alcalde of Chinchero three years ago.  Huaman is a member of Tierra y Libertad, a son of Shining Path.   He will be helping the Yanacona folks to share out S/11mn in communal cash.

Half of the Yanacona owners, despite the S/.138mn windfall, voted against. “The old men, none of them wanted to sell,” says the alcalde of Chinchero, Juan Carlos Gomez.  A bright, engaging 32-year-old, Gomez lives in Chinchero with his mum, and is trying to save what he can of Chinchero.

A further S/.48mn has gone to another district, Raachi, for the purchase of their land for the northern end of the runway.  This means that the Cusco government has already put down $74mn in buying ancient potato fields and rough grazing land.  They have achieved the impressive feat of grossly overpaying for a patch of some of the world’s highest agricultural land and cheating, at the same time, most of the people involved.

The present Cusco airport, at 3,300 m.a.s.l., lies on 240 valuable hectares.  It will last for another dozen, maybe 20, years with modest extensions of the runway and handling facilities, Corpac officials here tell me. They have already bought the lights for night flying.

Chinchero is 400m higher, a lot at these altitudes  This means that Chinchero will not be able to handle direct flights from the United States, much less Europe.

During the December-to-April rains, Chinchero is usually in the clouds.  I have to drive through with my lights on high beam on the way to Cusco.  Most nights the temperature is below freezing.  Hailstorms hit Chinchero on 150 days of the year.

In contrast, the Pampa de Anta, several hundred meters lower, the same height as Cusco itself and 20 minutes nearer to Cuzsco, is a much less damaging choice and used to be a lake. You could land a plane on it tomorrow, not the case with the rolling potato fields of Chinchero.

Before they rush into a non-urgent Chinchero disaster, someone should solve the overcrowding at Machu Picchu, which is even worse than the official computers suggest, as INC people often run rackets selling the same tickets twice.

In Chinchero, Alcalde Juan Carlos Gomez is from another deck of cards to today’s Cusco and Urubamba authorities.  He is a lively, studious and seasoned politician and administrator who talks readily about a reasonable solution to an impossible problem.

He says, “I have asked the Prime Minister and other members of the cabinet to form a top-level commission to try to ensure that the ecological resources and cultural traditions of Chinchero are protected.”

He adds: “In Cusco, no one wants to talk to me.”

Nicholas Asheshov lives in Urubamba.  A veteran journalist, noted explorer and entrepreneur, he was editor of the Peruvian Times from 1969 to 1990.

This article was first published in Spanish in Caretas magazine this week.

http://www.peruviantimes.com/31/country-notes-chinchero-the-airport-in-the-clouds/17977/

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Heathrow’s bid for a 3rd runway includes doubling air freight – with associated increase in lorries

In Heathrow’s proposal for a 3rd runway, it plans to double its cargo capacity. It hopes this will help its bid, due to the financial value of air freight. In the past, some of the air freight industry have said Heathrow ignored their needs. Heathrow is now saying that its key logistics role as a single primary air freight hub for the UK is important for the economy, for export competitiveness, and essential for British importers and exporters to enable them to access key global markets.  Some 65% of the UK’s £400bn air freight exports already travel via Heathrow, almost all as belly hold in passenger planes. The airport plans to have its freight area improved with a new cargo railhead, and better road links.  Speaking at the Runways UK conference on 2nd June, Simon Earle said local residents consulted by Heathrow were unhappy about the number of HGV lorries. Air pollution is already often in breach of air quality levels. An article by T&E bemoans the resistance to changes and to cuts in polluting emissions by the lorry manufacturers. That does not bode well for Heathrow air quality, with much higher numbers of HGV movements in future.
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Heathrow Airport outlines plans to double cargo capacity

Heathrow

By Will Waters

14 May 2014 (Lloyds Loading List)

Proposals welcomed as ‘Good news for freight’ by UK’s Freight Transport Association

Heathrow Airport will today outline plans to double its cargo capacity in a bid to reinforce its submission for consent to build a third runway, a development regarded as critical for its future.

The UK’s largest airport has long been accused by the freight industry of largely ignoring the needs of cargo, but in its revised expansion plans submitted to the UK Airports Commission today, it is expected to stress the key logistics role that Heathrow already holds within the UK economy and the importance of a single primary air freight hub rather than a sector that is widely dispersed across several UK airports.

The airport will stress that 65% of the UK’s £400bn air freight exports already travel via Heathrow, and that expansion of the airport’s cargo capabilities is essential for maintaining and improving UK export competitiveness.

Heathrow said its revised submission followed discussions with stakeholders including local and national businesses and elected representatives across the UK’s nations and regions.

The proposals were welcomed by the UK’s Freight Transport Association (FTA), which said Heathrow’s cargo announcement echoed the recently published FTA-commissioned ‘Sky High Value’ report, also submitted to The Airports Commission, which detailed the importance of air freight to the UK economy “and why continued investment in airport capacity was essential for British importers and exporters to enable them to access key global markets”.

The FTA’s director of global and European policy, Chris Welsh, said: “We have previously stated that it is imperative that the UK has a single air freight hub, and that Heathrow fulfils that role.

“It is an essential hub of connectivity for passengers and freight, bringing together huge resource, expertise and opportunity in one place.”

The airport’s cargo redevelopment plans are expected to include modern access points “including the potential for a cargo railhead, offering faster, more efficient cargo movements at the hub, which would improve the UK’s export competitiveness and maximise economic benefits”, the FTA said.

The FTA’s recent report said that 95% of the UK’s air cargo was carried in the belly-hold of passenger aircraft, with air freight accounting for nearly 40% of UK imports and exports by value and employing 39,000 people, most clustered around Heathrow.

Welsh added: “Heathrow is the UK’s main airport hub, but is currently operating at 98% capacity and needs to be able to expand to meet the needs of industry. It is a critical hub for air cargo, offering 191 destinations; it moves 1.5 million tonnes of freight and is vital for UK connectivity to its main overseas markets.”

Heathrow’s revised submission were joined by updated submissions for a second runway at Gatwick Airport and the revised submission for the airport commissions third shortlisted option, the so-called ‘Heathrow Hub’ option, which calls for an extension of Heathrow’s second runway.

The Airport’s Commission is due to present the UK government with its recommendations in mid-2015 following an exhaustive investigation of the options to deal with the current shortage of airport capacity at Heathrow and the long-term airport capacity needs in southern England.

Although the Commission is still considering other options, including a ‘greenfield’ airport in the Thames estuary, it has short-listed three proposals to investigate ahead of its final report.

Shippers, forwarders and carriers at last month’s Multimodal exhibition and conference claimed that politicians and airport operators had so far failed to consider freight within the current debate on UK airport capacity.

Tristan Koch, managing director of cargo sales in the Emea region for American Airlines, said no-one doubted the need for new air cargo infrastructure, but the freight industry needed to be “more visible” in arguing the importance of its needs to the UK government.

Grant Liddell, business development director of forwarder Metro Shipping, believed the problem was one of perception, and that no-one liked to boast about how much air freight they do.

“Retailers feel it is ‘un-green’ and the consumer may think [flown] goods are overpriced,” he said.

Liddell said billions of pounds had been invested in new ports, but there had been no similar impetus from airports. If Heathrow was constrained by the houses surrounding it, he argued, alternatives further north must be considered.

Graeme Ferguson, commercial director for Manchester Airports Group, operator of Stansted, Bournemouth, East Midlands and Manchester airports, was in strong agreement, claiming that the FTA report to the Davies Commission was “so skewed, I thought Heathrow had sponsored it”.

Welsh said industry had coalesced around one main hub, and the situation was not unique to the UK.

Koch agreed. “More cargo on our outbound flights is of non-UK origin than UK, so the hub role is crucial,” he said. “But we’re putting barriers in the way.

“We’re falling behind improvements in Europe such as expedited customs processes.
“Many customers only use air freight when they have to. It needs to be cheaper and faster, and service quality needs to go up.”

http://www.lloydsloadinglist.com/freight-directory/air/heathrow-airport-outlines-plans-to-double-cargo-capacity/20018110792.htm#.U42WofldXCs
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Lorries: 21st-century fleet or dinosaurs on our roads?

Driving Europe’s transport industry in a more sustainable direction is a formidable challenge, not least because it means a fairly fundamental change in the way fairly large industries do their business.

It is in the DNA of these industries to resist change forced upon them by politicians. Carmakers oppose CO2 standards that make them fit clean tech to their cars, the aviation and shipping industries oppose doing their share and of course oil companies fight any kind of change that could end our addiction to their products.

Still, truck makers are a rather special case. I will explain.
The trucking sector disproportionately affects all of us. Lorries represent just 3% of vehicles but they emit 25% of road transport CO2 emissions and that share continues to rise.
Lorries are also involved in 15% of road deaths, often killing cyclists and pedestrians, and the health costs associated with lorry pollution are estimated at €45 billion a year, according to the European Environment Agency.
The lorry industry hasn’t exactly been pro-active in tackling these problems. Lorry fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions levels stagnated for almost 20 years and truck safety made only minimal strides, when compared to the Euro NCAP-driven safety improvements in the car sector.
Still, lorry makers vehemently oppose any suggestion that they should do more. They’re against CO2 standards and  dismiss new safety rules. Instead they promise us all will be well as long as we let the market take care of the problem. Given its past performance, that’s a hard line to tow.
What makes the lorry industry really stand out though is that it does not merely oppose change that is imposed; it simply opposes any kind of change.
The weights and dimensions file that is currently going through the EU legislative machinery is a case in point. Europe’s outdated lorry dimensions rules constrain the design of lorry tractors and force blunt cab-over-engine designs. So the Commission has proposed relaxing length constraints, so that lorry makers can make  new curvy designs. Such curvy designs would be more aerodynamic, safer and more comfortable for drivers. There’s absolutely no downside to it.
The truck industry didn’t ask for this design flexibility, so when it was confronted with the Commission proposal, confusion reigned. How to react to a proposal that does not impose anything but just enables things?
Eventually, the industry grudgingly conceded that while in principle flexibility to make better cabins isn’t a bad thing, in this case new designs should be prohibited until at least 2025. The reason for this rather odd position? To maintain ‘competitive neutrality’ – suppose one manufacturer would have better designs on the shelves and another not, wouldn’t that be terribly unfair?
Imagine the big smart phone producers demanding a 10-year moratorium on 4G connectivity because one of them has just put out a new 3G smartphone and wants to keep selling it for a while. You could be certain the anti-cartel police would find them soon.
Not so in the truck sector. EU governments sympathise with the prohibition line of truck makers and agreed new designs should be banned for at least another eight years.
That banning safer, cleaner trucks will go at the expense of lives, diesel, pollution, and even those truck makers that are ready for new designs, doesn’t seem to sway Council.
Lorry makers as well as those regulating the sector should reflect carefully. The problems associated with trucking are real and very tangible for a lot of people. Lorries killing cyclists or lorry pollution destroying people’s health will continue to make headlines.
Not harvesting the lowest-hanging fruit available will raise the cost of tackling our oil addition and climate change. And it may also suggest truckmakers are inherently incapable of cleaning up their act – in which  case the EU should take its ambitions to shift vast amounts of freight to rail a bit more seriously.
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American FoI documents show USA is barring John Stewart from the country on allegations it admits are unfounded

On 29th September 2011 John Stewart set off for the USA for a speaking tour. He was arrested and taken off the plane by armed US police at New York JFK airport, under suspicion – in theory – of threatening Barak Obama. But he was held for lengthy questioning. He remains barred from entering the US.  Now the Telegraph’s David Millward reports that official US documents obtained by The Telegraph under American FoI legislation have raised fresh questions over John’s treatment. John spearheaded the campaign to block a 3rd Heathrow runway in 2010, and continues to lead the anti-runway campaign.  Documents now show that less than an hour before John’s Delta Airlines flight landed at JFK – it received reports that he had made a threat against the president. The source of this incorrect information remains unknown.  It is now clear that the US authorities knew as early as 4.29pm that: “previous reports were unsubstantiated”. But the questioning by the American secret service and FBI continued until around 9.15pm. The authorities decided to deport John, with no reason given, and with no redress.


 

 

US bars British environmentalist on allegations it admits are unfounded

The Telegraph has obtained documents that raise questions on US treatment of John Stewart, a key campaigner against Heathrow’s third runway, who the US said had threatened Barak Obama

US bars British environmentalist on allegations it admits are unfounded

Environmentalist John Stewart Photo: Ian Jones

An environmentalist who was hauled off a plane three years ago by armed US police for threatening the president remains barred from the country despite American authorities admitting the allegations were unfounded.

Official US documents obtained by The Telegraph under American freedom of information legislation have raised fresh questions over the treatment of John Stewart, who spearheaded a campaign against Heathrow’s third runway.

The planned runway was scrapped by the Tory-Liberal Democrat coalition on entering office after the election.

Until now the US has refused to say why Mr Stewart, who had flown to New York to address an aircraft noise conference, was hauled off a plane by armed police when he arrived at JFK airport on Sep 29 2011.

However the information provided by the US Transportation Security Administration shows that at 2.40pm – less than an hour before Mr Stewart’s Delta Airlines flight landed at JFK – it received reports that he had made a threat against the president.

However an internal email sent by the TSA’s co-ordination centre at JFK, obtained by The Telegraph, shows that the authorities concluded as early as 4.29pm that: “previous reports were unsubstantiated”.

Nevertheless, according to Mr Stewart, questioning by the American secret service and FBI continued until around 9.15pm.

No details of when or how the threat was made were disclosed and Mr Stewart insisted that he had said nothing on the aircraft to arouse suspicion.

Then he was held by armed police officer and member of the immigration staff before being put on an overnight flight to Heathrow, which left at 11pm.

“Interestingly I was not asked anything about making threats against the president after one initial question.

“Then they started asking me about the third runway campaign at Heathrow and what I was going to say to residents’ groups in the States.” The authorities appeared to be concerned about the activities of Plane Stupid – a group which disrupted airports by an array of stunts, including breaching security at Stansted, leading to the cancellation of dozens of flights.

But, Mr Stewart had not been involved with the group, an assurance which was acknowledged by his interrogators.

“They seemed to accept the fact I was not part of Plane Stupid and had taken no part in those actions and had no criminal record,” he said.

However Mr Stewart’s name did appear on a blacklist of environmental and trade union activists compiled by a group called the Consulting Association – which was subsequently prosecuted by the Information Commissioner.

The decision was taken to deport Mr Stewart after his lengthy interrogation.

“I was simply sent back, they didn’t give me a reason and the immigration officer said she didn’t need to give me a reason,” he said.

“Individually they were quite courteous but they made clear that no reason needed to be given.” As a result of being denied entry Mr Stewart, 64, needs a visa to visit the US and had one application turned down two years ago.

“I was invited to speak at a meeting in New York in 2012.

“In the spring I went to the American embassy to get a visa to go to the USA explaining very clearly that the purpose of my trip was a well-recognised international conference.

“After a day at the embassy they said I was not going to get a visa. I asked if I was barred for ever and a day. They said no but when I asked if it was worth my asking for a visa they said not particularly.

The decision to deny Mr Stewart entry was described as “preposterous” by Debi Wagner a member of the US campaign group Aviation Justice, which issued the original invitation to Mr Stewart.

“It was embarrassing for a country like the US to treat such distinguished campaigner like a common criminal.”

Mr Stewart’s treatment was also condemned by Gus Hosein, executive director of Privacy International.

“What is becoming clear is that any traveller to the US can be blacklisted by a malicious claim, and even an error.

“The border is a rights-free zone. There is something feudal about being detained, questioned, found innocent, and then exiled permanently without any recourse or redress.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/10868362/US-bars-British-environmentalist-on-allegations-it-admits-are-unfounded.html

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Earlier, when John went to the USA, was arrested and held, and refused entry:

 

John Stewart, UK’s “most effective environmentalist” barred from entering US

Environmentalists from across the US and Europe are surprised and outraged that

 

 

On September 29, Stewart, who does not have a criminal record and meets the requirements
for the US Visa Waiver program, had his visa waiver rescinded mid-flight. He was
questioned by the FBI, the Secret Service, and immigration for six hours at New
York’s JFK Airport before being put back on a plane to London.

American environmental campaigners had planned a month-long speaking tour for Stewart, set to begin on October 1. Stewart had been instrumental in the
campaign to stop a third runway at London’s Heathrow Airport. He had chaired the diverse coalition of neighbors, environmental activists,
fiscal conservatives, and local politicians which persuaded the Conservative government
to scrap plans for a new runway. In 2008 the Independent on Sunday voted Stewart “the UK’s most effective green activist.”

Environmentalist Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, says that barring a community organizer from entering the
U.S. is a dangerous statement. He continued, “We need more voices, not fewer,
explaining the dangers of climate change and the rational responses we must make.
And though it’s a backhanded testament to John Stewart’s effectiveness, this is
sad news for all of us hoping to hear what he had to say.”

Stewart said, “What seemed to concern them was that I would be discussing, as
part of my talk, the role that peaceful, non-violent civil disobedience played
in the Heathrow Campaign. I wouldn’t be able to explain the campaign without doing
so. In any case, it is completely legitimate to discuss the role of an activity
which has featured so heavily in so many historical campaigns, from the American
Civil Rights Movement, to the Suffragettes’ fight for the right of women to vote
in the UK.”

Stewart has also won support from across Europe and the UK. Earlier today, Conservative
member of the British Parliament Zac Goldsmith tweeted: “Heathrow campaigner, John Stewart barred from US. A heroic campaigner, and
a gent. Utterly scandalous.”

U.S. organizers have spent over a year planning the month-long national lecture
tour on aviation and the environment, and are shocked and embarrassed at their
government’s actions. Another invited speaker, award-winning Scottish climate
activist Dan Glass, was effectively blocked from participating because his visa
application was delayed indefinitely due to special “administrative processing.”

“John Stewart is a mainstream environmentalist who we invited because of his
ability to work with everybody, and for his role in helping influence people like British Prime Minister David Cameron to choose bold green solutions,” says Barnali Ghosh, a San Francisco tour organizer.
“Americans needs to hear from more centrists who can build left-right coalitions.”
Seattle organizer Debi Wagner asks why Stewart’s visa was rescinded mid-flight. “Barring environmentalists
won’t make us any safer or healthier.”

New York organizer Dr. Frans Verhagen is outraged, but affirms that the tour will go ahead. “We will use videoconferencing to ensure that John Stewart and Dan Glass can
still address our meetings. Our lecture tour still begins in New York tomorrow,
as planned.”

Details of the tour can be found at http://aviationjustice.org/tour/

The Aviation Justice Express is a coalition of airport watchdog, climate action,
and sustainable transportation groups and activists. Endorsers include 350.org,
US Citizens Aviation Watch, Concerned Residents Against Airport Pollution, Sane
Aviation for Everyone, Shut This Airport Nightmare Down, All Aboard Washington,
AirportWatch, So We Stand, and Left Field Films.

http://aviationjustice.org/2011/09/30/john-stewart-barred-from-us/#comment-119

 

Some comments:

It is a huge compliment to Dan and John that the US government is so terrified
of them and their viewpoint that it bans them from speaking physically to people
in the USA. It just shows how repressive the US government is and how Obama has
done nothing to change that.

I have spoken to both, particularly Dan, but wouldn’t claim to know either well.
However, I do know both well enough to know that they are no danger to the people
of the USA. If they were then that might justify the bans. They are certainly
a danger to vested interests in the US, which is why Obama’s government has banned
them.

The land of the free? Round objects.

Be careful that Obama doesn’t interfere with telecommunications, so preventing
people in the USA from hearing Dan and John.

===============

 I find it upsetting that a community organizer with no criminal record can be
stopped at the border and turned back.

==============

 Whatever the intentions of the authorities, their actions will certainly backfire
on them. Stewart’s work is now getting more attention than ever here in the U.S.

=================

By refusing John entry into the US the police have done more to highlight ‘airport
expansion’ and fuel direct action than possibly John could have done.  Well done
USA  – you mucked up again !
Smacks of Climate Camp Heathrow. The media attention because of the police action
made the campaign Global.
Well done John and you didn’t even have to go all that way.
=================
The campaigns to highlight the problem of aviation expansion are important, because
globally the industry continues to have crazy growth plans.  Other sectors have
to cut back their emissions, but aviation intends to keep on increasing the number
of flights and passengers, ad infinitum. At huge environmental cost. Now kerosene
is getting more expensive, they plan to use biofuels.  This has immense and worrying
implications for all of us, and the campaigners are doing the US a public service
in waking them out of their slumber, to sit up and take notice of the problems
they are sleepwalking into.  The US government and the , American people, should
be very grateful for the wake up call that this US speaking tour will provide.
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GACC calls on all councils around Gatwick to hold public meetings on flight path plans

Gatwick airport is consulting on future changes to flight paths. The consultation is long, complicated and almost incomprehensible to the average lay person. It is very hard indeed for those to be over flown, with no experience of aircraft noise, to understand. The proposals could have a serious impact on many towns and villages around the airport, and potentially affect an area from Guildford to Tunbridge Wells and from Petworth to Sevenoaks. Now GACC has called on all parish councils and town councils around Gatwick airport to hold public meetings to enable residents to understand and discuss the new flight paths proposed by the airport.  If the parish or town is not affected by the new flight paths, then GACC suggest that a meeting should be held to discuss the proposals for a new runway. John Byng, Vice chairman of GACC, said:  ‘Many people are telling us that the flight path document is difficult to understand.  The proposals affect each area differently, so we believe that local meetings are the best answer.’  GACC will be asking for a simpler version of the consultation to be sent to all those under the new flight path, and for maps showing the full length of the new flight paths, not merely below 4,000 feet.
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New flight paths 

31.5.2014 (GACC – Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign)

Gatwick Airport Ltd (GAL) have launched a consultation on their plans to redraw many of the flight paths around Gatwick.  The document is at www.gatwickairport.com/gatwickairspaceconsultation

These proposals could have a serious impact on many towns and villages around the airport, and we advise you to study them carefully.  The new flight paths will potentially affect an area from Guildford to Tunbridge Wells and from Petworth to Sevenoaks.

GACC is extremely concerned about these proposals which could represent the biggest change in the noise impact of Gatwick for a generation.

We will need to take time to study them in detail but our initial reaction is that -

1. Any change in flight paths causes great distress and anger because the previous peace is shattered, expectations of future peace are destroyed, houses are devalued and people are unable to move and feel imprisoned.  People have paid extra for houses that are not on flight paths only to find that new flight paths are being created – without compensation.

2.  One of the main motivations is GAL’s desire to get more aircraft off the runway, and thus to make a larger profit.[i]  There is no need for extra flights when Stansted is only half full.

3.  The consultation covers too small an area because disturbance is experienced far beyond the noise contours, particularly in areas where background noise is low.  It is a disgrace that no maps are given showing the full length of the new flight paths.[ii]

4.  No details are given of the new point-merge system for arriving aircraft which will affect much of East and West Sussex, and part of Kent.[iii]

5.  A risk is that this consultation will set community against community.   Anger should be directed at the airport, not at your neighbours.

6.  The airspace is being redesigned in ignorance of what causes disturbance.  The necessary research has not been done.  For example, there is no evidence that concentration will cause less disturbance than dispersal. Ten flights an hour over one person may cause as much annoyance as one flight an hour over ten people.

7.  The proposed new flight paths all relate to the existing runway.  If ever a new Gatwick runway were to be built, all the flight paths will need to be revised, with new flight paths over areas at present peaceful.  So why cause extra hassle now, when there is no urgent need for change?

8.  The 60 page consultation document[iv] is written in technical language and is difficult for lay people to understand.  GACC will be asking for a simpler version to be sent to all those under the new flight paths, and for public meetings to be held so that people can understand what is proposed.

 

[i]   GAL is a private company owned by overseas investors.

[ii]   The reason is that this consultation is being conducted by Gatwick Airport Ltd which is responsible for flight paths below 4,000 feet.  NATS (National Air Traffic Services) is responsible for flights above that height.

[iii]  Presumably because this new procedure would apply to aircraft above 4,000 feet.

[iv]  120 pages including maps.

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Gatwick flight path changes revealed as 12 week airspace consultation launched

Gatwick airport has started another consultation on changes to its flight paths. This will last for 12 weeks and end on 15th August. The earlier “consultation” done by Gatwick, that ended on 15th May did not include any flight path details, which many who attended the exhibitions found frustrating. Gatwick’s consultation is complex and not intended to be easy for a non-expert to understand. It is rich in acronyms and jargon, that is not properly explained. One could conjecture that making the consultation so hard to understand is deliberate. At its heart the consultation is about Gatwick managing to get more planes using its current flight paths, with changes to get planes taking off separating earlier, so more planes can use the runway with shorter intervals between them. There remains the issue of whether the noise should be concentrated down narrow routes, or dispersed in “swathes” of several kilometres. The Noise Preferential Routes, for planes below 3,000 feet or 4,000 feet, are meant to be routes where the least noise nuisance is caused. However, planes above 4,000 feet are still a real noise irritation. Gatwick’s proposals for more planes on more routes will mean many more people being exposed to a lot more plane noise, either way.

Click here to view full story…

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