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GACC calls for flight path trial to stop due to anger and outrage in the village of Warnham

A new flight path for take-offs from Gatwick airport has caused outrage in the parish of Warnham, near Horsham.  Designed as a 6-month trial to enable more aircraft to take-off from the Gatwick runway it has already caused a wave of protest.  A member of the GACC (Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign), Sally Pavey, who lives in Warnham, says: ‘The tranquillity of our 14th century, conservation village has been lost and we seem powerless to do anything about it.  Everyone is up in arms as we are woken at 6.00 am with an aircraft overhead every few minutes. Living in Warnham has turned into a nightmare!’ GACC has called for the trial to be stopped.  The new route is causing an unacceptable degree of upset and maximum anger. It is just a small foretaste of what is to come if a new runway were to be built.  ”With a new runway the new flight paths would bring anger and misery to perhaps 30 or more towns and villages.  And that would be permanent, not just for 6 months.  Warnham is a wake-up call for why we should all oppose a new runway.’
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Village outraged by new flight path. GACC calls for trial to stop

30 or more towns and villages could suffer same fate

Gatwick new runway indicative departure flight paths

A new flight path has caused outrage in the parish of Warnham, near Horsham.  Designed as a six-month trial to enable more aircraft to take-off from the Gatwick runway it has already caused a wave of protest.  GACC committee member, Sally Pavey, who lives in Warnham, says: ‘The tranquillity of our 14th century, conservation village has been lost and we seem powerless to do anything about it.  Everyone is up in arms as we are woken at 6.00 am with an aircraft overhead every few minutes, living in Warnham has turned into a nightmare!’

GACC has called for the trial to be stopped.  ‘It is due to last six months which could be intolerable” says GACC vice chairman, John Byng:  ‘It has also proved what we have always said – that any new route causes maximum anger as people find their peace destroyed and their houses devalued.

‘It is just a small foretaste of what is to come if a new runway were to be built’ according to Brendon Sewill, GACC chairman.  ‘With a new runway the new flight paths would bring anger and misery to perhaps 30 or more towns and villages.  And that would be permanent, not just for six months.  Warnham is a wake-up call for why we should all oppose a new runway.’

For further information

See www.gacc.org.uk/latest-news

The Argus: Angry Warnham residents

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Gatwick new runway indicative departure flight paths

file:///C:/Users/Sarah/Downloads/FlightPathsDepart.pdf

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The Argus: Angry Warnham residents

Illustration of course of trial flight path over Warnham, north west of Horsham

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See also

 

Villages up in arms as new Gatwick flight path shatters their peace and quiet

Date added: March 9, 2014

The Sunday Times has featured the story of the misery and upset being caused over villages in Sussex by a new trial flight path from Gatwick. The village of Warnham is particularly affected. It is a quiet village, but now has planes taking off from Gatwick thundering overhead. Some of the affected residents are the mother-in-law of Boris Johnson, who said who say the noise is so loud that it sets off baby monitors and drowns out the sound of local church bells. Also Caroline Lucas, whose family owns the 215-acre Warnham Park, with a large herd of red deer, said: “How long will future generations stay here? That’s the question you have to ask.” The 6 month trial, of which there was no notice given to local residents, is of a new departure route for planes mainly bound for southern Europe, which are now turning south earlier than they normally do. The airport says the trial is to find out if a new aircraft navigation system will allow air traffic controllers to reduce the interval between flights taking off from two minutes to one, potentially allowing more flights to take off at peak times. ie. make Gatwick even busier than now.

Click here to view full story…

 

Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign speaks up for the village of Warnham, suffering from an unannounced flight path trial

March 4, 2014

A new flight path has been introduced for aircraft taking off from Gatwick to the west, then turning left around Horsham. It passes directly over the village of Warnham and is apparently a trial designed in order to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway. GACC (the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign) considers it intolerable that new misery and a decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit for the owners of Gatwick. Normally there are 3 take off routes to the west, which are contained within compulsory Noise Preferential Route (NPR) corridors. The new route route departs from the NPR, particularly over Warnham, where it has caused consternation. The trial is a technical one not intended to measure the social impact and they did not announce it in advance so as not to provoke complaints that might not have emerged otherwise. The airport says because it is a trial it was not necessary to consult, as would be a legal requirement if the new route were to be permanent. GACC say there is no national need for this route change – Stansted airport is operating at less than half its capacity. People fear that this new route is a small fore-taste of the widespread misery and protest that would be created across Surrey and Sussex by a new runway.

Click here to view full story…

 

New Gatwick flightpath trials are ‘destroying’ village life at Warnham, West Sussex

February 27, 2014

Residents in Warnham, about 10 km south west of Gatwick, and complaining strenuously about low-flying aircraft going over their homes from 6am each day. They feel the character of their village, let alone its tranquillity, are being destroyed. This is part of a trial for a new new flightpath which started on February 17th and will continue for 6 months. The trial is being run by NATS in conjunction with Gatwick airport, but people in Warnham complain that they were not notified or consulted in advance of the trial. The planes pass over the village at approximately 2,000ft and villagers say they can be as frequent as every 5 minutes at some times of day. The noise is loud enough to have raised concerns about its impact on vulnerable residents, in particular the elderly and disabled. The Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) claims that rural residents suffer more from noise pollution than urban residents. The noise is more intrusive as there is little background noise. GACC is concerned that the trial of the new flightpath over Warnham is designed solely to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway. “It is intolerable that new misery and decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit.”     Click here to view full story…

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Concerns about the effectiveness of a new aviation noise authority – and the public’s trust in it

March 4, 2014

In its interim report published on 17th December 2013, the Airports Commission recommended to government “… the establishment of an Independent Noise Authority to provide expert and impartial advice about the noise impacts of aviation and to facilitate the delivery of future improvements to airspace operations.” GACC – the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign – has responded to this suggestion with a lot of caveats. GACC would welcome the authority if its main purpose is to reduce aircraft noise, but not if its main purpose is to persuade local residents to relax their opposition to a new runway at Gatwick. Residents want the noise to be reduced, not ‘mitigating’, and not ‘reducing the number of people affected’ if that means merely making noise worse for fewer people. . There have been years of unsatisfactory complaints mechanisms on aircraft noise, and also of broken assurances from the aviation industry. “A single point for complaints, an aircraft noise ombudsman with power to order improvement or compensation, would be welcome. But we do not see this in the recommendations of the Commission’s Interim Report.” There are fears that the new body will be “long grass into which difficult issues could be consigned.” A body designed to smooth the path of a new runway, whether at Gatwick or elsewhere would be vigorously opposed.

Click here to view full story…

 

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Brussels flight link returns to Newcastle Airport – with 11 BMI flights per week

The North East once again has a direct link to Brussels with the launch of new flights by BMI from Newcastle to Brussels.  In February 2013 Brussels Airlines stopped the flights, as it was not profitable enough. There had been 3 flight per day, 6 days per week.  Now BMI Regional has stepped in, offering 11 flights a week  (twice a day Monday to Friday and once on Sunday) to and from Belgium.  An airport spokesman said  “The route is one that we lost earlier in the economic downturn, but we were determined to get it back.  ….. Connectivity is very important, and not just to business – Newcastle University finds EU funding key so we hope this route will also let them grow.” MEP Martin Callanan hopes the route will aid local business.  “We’ll start with 11 flights a week and then, if the demand is there, look at the possibility of a third daily flight.”
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Brussels flight link returns to Newcastle International Airport

The North East once again has a direct link to Brussels with the launch of new flights from Newcastle

A BMI plane at Newcastle International Airport from Brussels

The North East once again has a direct link to Brussels with the launch of new flights from Newcastle.

Passengers have been unable to go straight to the capital of Europe from the region for almost a year after Brussels Airlines pulled out of the route.

But now BMI Regional has stepped in, offering 11 flights a week to and from Belgium – with it’s inaugural service greeted with a water cannon salute as it touched down atNewcastle International Airport.

“This is great news for the region,” airport planning and corporate affairs director Graeme Mason said.

“The route is one that we lost earlier in the economic downturn, but we were determined to get it back.

“We’ve worked very closely with businesses in the region and with the MEPs – who we’d like to thank for their support – and we’ve got a great airline in BMI Regional, which is the most punctual in the UK.

“Connectivity is very important, and not just to business – Newcastle University finds EU funding key so we hope this route will also let them grow.”

MEP Martin Callanan said, while the route will save him hours in travel time every week, it is the boon to business he is most looking forward to.

“This is great news for the region as transport routes are key to businesses, and will help to bring more jobs and revenue to the regional economy,” he said.

BMI chief executive Cathal O’Con­nell said the first flight had demonstrated exactly the sort of passengers they believe will be using the service, which runs twice a day Monday to Friday and once on Sunday.

“We’re absolutely delighted to be providing this service,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of discussions with both business and leisure interests on both sides of the sea and we believe the demand is there for this.

“The first flight had 38 people on board and that included businessmen, families and people from the Parliament, which is exactly the sort of people we expect.

“We’ll start with 11 flights a week and then, if the demand is there, look at the possibility of a third daily flight.”

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/brussels-flight-link-returns-newcastle-6768480

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Transport minister rules out cash handout for Newcastle Airport’s USA flights plan

 

Transport minister Robert Goodwill said he would not be using taxpayer cash to back direct flights from Tyneside during a visit to help launch Newcastle Airport’s new business park.

The aviation minister has ruled out Government support for flights from Newcastle to the USA, as the city’s airport kick-started its ambitious plans to create thousands of jobs.

Transport minister Robert Goodwill said he would not be using taxpayer cash to back direct flights from Tyneside during a visit to help launch Newcastle Airport’s new business park.

Airport chiefs say a £30m plan for six office buildings next to the Callerton Parkway Metro station will create around 1,000 jobs, part of a wider plan to expand the airport site along with property firm UK Land Estates.

Meeting with senior airport staff yesterday, Mr Goodwill said the Government was committed to backing “local international airports”.

However, asked if he would go as far as to offer support for the new flights – connections which would bring a much needed boost to the regional economy – the Scarborough and Whitby MP said he would leave it to the airport to sell itself abroad rather than offering Government financial support.

Flights to the US have been a target of not just the airport, with its seven council owners, but also the job-creating local enterprise partnership and the Chamber of Commerce, who have all backed the need for expansion westwards. But yesterday Mr Goodwill put on hold any hope of Government subsidy.

He said: “If you look at flights to Dubai you can see what can be done without Government funding.

“That successful route has been made without the need to use taxpayers’ money to subsidise it.” Mr Goodwill added: “I know that there has been some lobbying about, say, relaxing the air passenger duty here. The worry is that that could create a churn where the flights are only here until that subsidy goes.

“We have not been persuaded by the arguments so far. The Dubai flights are very well subscribed flights, the case can be made (to the operators) I think for flights into New Jersey or wherever in America.”

Newcastle International Airport chief executive David Laws said he believed the airport’s expansion and new office space would make it an even more attractive investment to American airlines.

“The new business park will help attract the type of airline that the whole region is desperate for,” he said. Mr Laws told the minister that connections through Newcastle Airport played a key role in encouraging firms to relocate to the region.

He added: “The location is great not only for aviation related companies, but also professional services, technology and IT, telecommunications and oil and gas / offshore businesses, who can make use of the excellent connectivity on offer.

“This is a very important development for us and one which we feel will be very popular.

“Other successful regional airports have been able to diversify their business and we see this scheme as critical in supporting the growth of the airport.

The overall project will comprise four phases, which collectively have the potential to deliver over 7,000 jobs and a regional economic boost of over £300m.

The development is being overseen by a steering group comprising Newcastle International Airport, UK Land Estates, Newcastle City Council, the Homes and Communities Agency and the North Eastern Local Enterprise Partnership.

Nick Forbes, leader of Newcastle City Council, said “Newcastle Airport provides an important gateway to new business opportunities across the globe.

“The creation of this new International Business Park at Newcastle Airport is a clear indication of our growing economic confidence and we look forward to welcoming new investors to our city and region, knowing they’ll benefit from a fantastic location and excellent connections.”

http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/north-east-news/transport-minister-rules-out-cash-6742461


 

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In December 2013, in response to the Airports Commission interim report, Newcastle airport said:

17.12.2013

A new third runway at Heathrow would benefit the North East and see more connecting flights reach Newcastle International Airport.

……….Last night airport bosses said that the expansion at Heathrow needs to get the go-ahead so Newcastle International Airport can continue to have hub connecting flights.

Graeme Mason, planning and corporate affairs director at the airport, said: “I think the report is great news for the North East because of the options it has highlighted. It could have had a long list of options but it focuses particularly on Heathrow and Gatwick which is what we wanted.

“We strongly support Heathrow and the fact the report has made reference to its expansion is great news.

“We have submitted input into the whole process and we have always said we will support the expansion of Heathrow.

“Heathrow is the biggest single hub serving the region with half a million passengers, 50% of which are connecting to another airport.

“It is by far the largest and if Heathrow wasn’t expanding we could lose the connection. A new runway was always seen as the best interest for the North East.”

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Some earlier news stories about Newcastle airport:

 

Newcastle airport produces new draft master plan for increasing number of leisure passengers

July 26, 2013        Newcastle Airport published a master plan in 1994, and another in 2003. That predicted by 2030 it might have 9 million passengers. There is now another draft master plan, out for consultation until 31st October, which anticipates perhaps 8.5 million passengers by 2030 (DfT anticipates around 6.3 million). They want to grow passenger numbers from the 4.4 million by 2030 and increase aircraft movements from 62,200 to up to 87,500 – making it one of the top 10 biggest airports in the UK. There are the usual predictions of more jobs (they say the airport now “supports” (vague term) 7,800 jobs across the region and by 2030 this will rise to 10,000. The airport hopes to develop 2 business parks on land south of the runway – one to extend existing aviation-related activities such as freight, and a new site for offices. They say these have the potential to deliver “thousands more” jobs. The airport says it contributed £646m to the regional economy in 2012, and by 2030 it is estimated that this figure will “more than double.” In 2005 some 22% of passengers were on business; by the 2009 CAA air passenger survey, it was only 20% on business. ie. 80% of passengers are leisure, contributing to taking their holiday money out of the UK.      Click here to view full story…

 

Emirates considers direct flights to the USA from UK northern airports, not Heathrow

July 26, 2013     Dubai’s Emirates Airline is interested in getting into the competitive transatlantic market, and offer flights from Dubai to the US via the UK. This market is currently dominated by BA, Virgin Atlantic, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines. Emirates will need to get regulatory approval first. Emirates believes there is strong unmet demand for flights from the north of England to the USA and last year carried 800,000 passengers on its routes in and out of its hubs in the north of England: Glasgow, Newcastle, Manchester and Birmingham. There are growing numbers of Emirates passengers and services from these northern UK airports. In October, Emirates will launch flights from Dubai to New York via Milan. Their UK vice president said they are asking the Airports Commission to look at making all the regional airports completely open skies, so anyone can fly anywhere. If they use the northern airports, there is less pressure on the south east airports, and less rationale for building another runway. “Heathrow sits in the south of England, but Manchester has a bigger catchment area in terms of a two-hour drive.” If Emirates goes through with the plan BA and Virgin will be the big losers.    Click here to view full story..

 

Airlines like Emirates keen to fly from regional airports (like Newcastle) – reducing future demand at Heathrow and Gatwick

March 25, 2013     Heathrow Airport has been saying recently that, though it is desperate to get a third runway, even they realise that there is not the demand for a 4th runway. The DfT has consistently over-estimated the amount of passenger demand over the last decade. In reality, passengers from parts of the UK other than the south east can get long haul flights from regional airports. The UK Vice President of Emirates says he wants to expand flights from UK’s regional airports, rather than Heathrow or Gatwick, and has a direct flight from Newcastle to Dubai, for transfers on from there. With that happening more and more in future, the south east airports’ dreams for expansion in the south east, requiring a massive hub airport, look less and less probable. Forecasts more than a few years ahead are based on so many uncertainties and unknowns as to be almost without value. Making best use of existing airports is more efficient than grandiose new infrastructure projects which run the risk of being white elephants. Had a second Stansted runway been built by 2012, it would now be standing idle.    Click here to view full story…

 

Brussels Airlines to ground Newcastle to Brussels flight link

Feb 21 2013     It is  cancelling its direct flights from Newcastle to Brussels. Brussels Airlines currently runs 3 flights a day, 6 days a week from the region to Brussels.  Only last month, as part of a deal with budget operator Flybe, it announced plans to increase capacity by 60%. But future flights were quietly dropped from the company’s website, and now airport bosses have admitted the route is under threat and they are looking for someone else to take it on. North East Euro MP Fiona Hall said the move risked sending out the wrong message to companies looking to invest in the area. But the North East Chamber of Commerce said the move needs to be considered alongside the recent positive announcements of more flights to other parts of Europe. Seven weeks ago, a 78-seater Bombardier Q400 aircraft was introduced on the route, increasing capacity on the thrice-daily service by 60%. At the time it was said that the “frequency of flights and range of onward connections” was ensuring the route “remains popular and continues to thrive”.Click here to view full story ….

 

 

Local Councils should sell Newcastle Airport stake to save jobs and services

December 7, 2012     Conservative councillors in Northumberland and Newcastle have said the time has come for the North East’s 7 local authorities get out of the airport business and offload their shares. They could then avoid cuts to council services and jobs. The councils between them, including Northumberland and Newcastle, own a 51% stake in Newcastle airport, but have also had to spend £68m to help refinance its debts. In exchange the authorities receive on average just £500,000 a year in dividends, as well as a say over bigger airport issues. The ownership of the airport has been particularly controversial after a former airport chief executive to walk away with a multi-million £ bonus. At the hearing, which the airport lost but is trying to appeal against, a judge made repeated references to the councils’ lack of experience in running an airport.    Click here to view full story…

 

and more at 

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Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign speaks up for the village of Warnham, suffering from an unannounced flight path trial

A new flight path has been introduced for aircraft taking off from Gatwick to the west, then turning left around Horsham. It passes directly over the village of Warnham and is apparently a trial designed in order to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway. GACC (the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign) considers it intolerable that new misery and a decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit for the owners of Gatwick. Normally there are 3 take off routes to the west, which are contained within compulsory Noise Preferential Route (NPR) corridors. The new route route departs from the NPR, particularly over Warnham, where it has caused consternation.  The trial is a technical one not intended to measure the social impact and they did not announce it in advance so as not to provoke complaints that might not have emerged otherwise. The airport says because it is a trial it was not necessary to consult, as would be a legal requirement if the new route were to be permanent. GACC say there is no national need for this route change – Stansted airport is operating at less than half its capacity. People fear that this new route is a small fore-taste of the widespread misery and protest that would be created across Surrey and Sussex by a new runway.
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The Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign speaks up for the village of Warnham

28 .2.2014 (GACC – Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign)

The Argus: Angry Warnham residents

Illustration of course of trial flight path over Warnham, north west of Horsham

Yesterday John Byng of the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) spoke up at the Gatwick noise committee meeting (Noise and Track Monitoring Advisory Group – NATMAG) concerning the trial of a new departure route from Gatwick that passes close to the centre of Warnham.

The trial route is one of four for aircraft taking off towards the west, whereas there were previously only three.

Most take-offs are to the west because of the prevailing winds but there have been one or two days of respite recently when the wind has required take-offs to be towards the east.

The other three normal routes are contained within compulsory Noise Preferential Route (NPR) corridors (designed to minimise nuisance and give certainty concerning the neighbourhoods impacted by take-off noise) but the trial route departs from the NPR, particularly in respect of Warnham.

Liz Kitchen (Horsham Councillor for Rusper and Capel) opened the discussion on the trial by saying she had considerable sympathy for the Warnham residents many of whom have lived in the village for years and suddenly find themselves over-flown.

Gatwick and the National Air Traffic Control Service (NATS) both stated that it is a useful trial that is needed for a number of reasons and that there are both winners (people not now being over-flown) as well as losers (in Warnham and other places on the track).

The trial is a technical one not intended to measure the social impact and they did not announce it in advance so as not to provoke complaints that might not have emerged otherwise.

They assert that because it is a trial it was not necessary to consult, as would be a legal requirement if the new route were to be permanent.

They also stated that the route was carefully designed to minimise the number of people over-flown and that it passes between several villages including Warnham and not over any of them.

Peter Long (Reigate & Banstead Environmental Protection Officer) pointed out that the track is quite close to Warnham and would be perceived as over-head by many residents.  NATS pointed out that some of the villages that have been avoided by the new track are actually over-flown otherwise.

John Byng weighed in heavily making the point that many residents of Warnham have bought their houses on the understanding that they were not close to a departure route and had paid extra on that basis.

They are now getting a large proportion of the departures on a single track only three quarters of a mile from the centre of the village; that the aircraft concerned are in climb mode at about 4000ft so making a considerable noise every few minutes; and that this has happened suddenly to a village that is not used to it.

He said the trial should be stopped and asked whether they yet have sufficient data.  When told that more data is needed to ensure safe and efficient operations in a variety of circumstances he asked that the trial should be brought to a close as soon as possible.  Since then the Civil Aviation Authority has made the same point.

It was mentioned that a noise monitor instrument is located in the area and enquiries will be made into whether it might be used to measure the noise impact of the trial.  Clearly such measurements will have limited value and should have been thought about before the trial began but what matters more than the level of the noise is the level of disturbance which will not be measured except in terms of complaints.

The Argus: Angry Warnham residents

The airport complaints telephone line is simply an answerphone so complainants may prefer to email noise.line@gatwickairport.com .

Complainants should take care to ask for a response but make clear that their message is a complaint because otherwise it may be counted as an enquiry.

In general discussion it was noted that the trial is a taste of things to come.  The Airspace consultation, which recently closed, envisages new routes over people who are not used to it.

It also envisages narrow tracks rather than broad corridors or swathes so that the number over-flown is reduced but those who are over-flown get disturbed very much more frequently.  These protests from Warnham could be the first of many and many other villages could find themselves in a similar situation.

A NATS description of the trial is at http://www2.westsussex.gov.uk/ds/cttee/gat/gat300114key4.pdf

and those who would like to see the tracks taken by aircraft as they take off from Gatwick will find http://flighttracking.casper.aero/lgw/ interesting.

It shows as “live” the events of 20 minutes earlier but can be set to show a “replay” of events hours or days earlier (top left hand corner).

 

Joining GACC

Anybody wishing to help support the work of the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign can do so by downloading a membership form from their web site at www.gacc.org.uk .

By doing so they will not be joining an anti Gatwick or anti aviation campaign but one that is devoted to minimising the adverse impacts for the environment and communities.

 

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Earlier:

New Gatwick flightpath trials are ‘destroying’ village life at Warnham, West Sussex

February 27, 2014

Residents in Warnham, about 10 km south west of Gatwick, and complaining strenuously about low-flying aircraft going over their homes from 6am each day. They feel the character of their village, let alone its tranquillity, are being destroyed. This is part of a trial for a new new flightpath which started on February 17th and will continue for 6 months. The trial is being run by NATS in conjunction with Gatwick airport, but people in Warnham complain that they were not notified or consulted in advance of the trial. The planes pass over the village at approximately 2,000ft and villagers say they can be as frequent as every 5 minutes at some times of day. The noise is loud enough to have raised concerns about its impact on vulnerable residents, in particular the elderly and disabled. The Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) claims that rural residents suffer more from noise pollution than urban residents. The noise is more intrusive as there is little background noise. GACC is concerned that the trial of the new flightpath over Warnham is designed solely to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway. “It is intolerable that new misery and decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit.”

Click here to view full story…

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Aviation Minister, Robert Goodwill, launches Newcastle Airport Business Park with hopes of large numbers of jobs

Aviation Minister Robert Goodwill MP has launched a new airport business park, in conjunction with the airport and Newcastle City Council. The business park was outlined in the airport’s 2013 master plan.  There are suggestions that the business park could bring 7,000 jobs over 20 years (though usually many of these jobs are not additional, but move in from elsewhere).  The first phase of the plans will establish 175,000 sq ft of office accommodation across six buildings, in close proximity to the airport and within walking distance of a Metro station.  The hope is that it will attract new investors to the region and attract businesses in new international markets, such as digital and high-tech. The promoters hope the park will benefit from not only having air links but also good road and rail infrastructure nearby. The airport said other successful regional airports have been able to diversify their businesses, to not only depend on aviation. Mr Goodwill hoped Newcastle Airport succeeded in its goal to operate transatlantic flights to the US East Coast.
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Aviation Minister launches Newcastle Airport Business

Park that could deliver 7,000 jobs

By Tom Keighley

24 FEB 2014 (B daily)

Plans to develop a new business park at Newcastle Airport, that could deliver 7,000 North

East jobs over the next 20 years, are in motion.

The Airport’s planning and corporate affairs director, Graeme Mason, said there was potential for further developments if the scheme was successful.

Phase one of the park plans will establish 175,000 sq ft of office accommodation across six buildings, in close proximity to the airport and within walking distance of Callerton Parkway Metro station.

Aviation Minister Robert Goodwill MP joined Newcastle International Airport chief executive David Laws and Leader of Newcastle City Council Nick Forbes to launch the development, which was outlined in the airport’s 2013 masterplan.

Team Valley Trading Estate owners UK Land Estates are partners in the project, which will be marketed by commercial property agents Knight Frank.

Graeme Mason said the development was well placed to take advantage of the recovering economy and hoped it would attract new investors to the region.

He told Bdaily: “This is really going to attract businesses that need quick and efficient access to new international markets, such as the offshore sector, digital and high-tech.

“Not only has it got the air links, but there’s connectivity via excellent road and rail infrastructure nearby.”

Mr Mason allayed concerns that existing commercial property did remain empty in the region – indicating that the Airport and its partners had done extensive research to establish demand and units were “pitched at the right size.”

Map showing the planned area for the Business Park to the south of the Airport.

Dave Laws, chief executive of Newcastle International Airport, said: “The location of the Newcastle International Airport Business Park is ideal for businesses who will benefit from the excellent connectivity through the airport.

“The location is great not only for aviation related companies, but also professional services, technology and IT, telecommunications and oil and gas / offshore businesses, who can make use of the excellent connectivity on offer.

“This is a very important development for us and one which we feel will be very popular. Other successful regional airports have been able to diversify their business and we see this scheme as critical in supporting the growth of the airport.

“We are delighted to work with UK Land Estates and our shareholders on this project and the launch today is an exciting first step.”

Newcastle City Council Leader Nick Forbes cheered the plans and said they pertained to his own ambition of making Newcastle the best place to locate business in the UK.

The Aviation Minister welcomed the development and also said he hoped Newcastle Airport succeeded in its goal to operate transatlantic flights to the US East Coast.

Speaking to Bdaily on a tour of the Airport the MP for Scarborough and Whitby said the Government’s ambition for Newcastle was to grow investment, flights and jobs.

He said: “We’d like to improve surface connectivity and that means investment in the metro and the investment that’s happening on the A1.

“High Speed rail will also bring benefits to the region, as trains will not stop at Leeds, but continue at normal speeds to Newcastle.”

Newcastle International Airport chief executive David Laws (left) with Aviation Minister Robert Goodwill MP (centre) and Newcastle City Council Leader Nick Forbes (right)

https://bdaily.co.uk/industrials/24-02-2014/aviation-minister-launches-newcastle-airport-business-park-that-could-deliver-7000-jobs/

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Some recent news about Newcastle airport:

Newcastle airport produces new draft master plan for increasing number of leisure passengers

July 26, 2013        Newcastle Airport published a master plan in 1994, and another in 2003. That predicted by 2030 it might have 9 million passengers. There is now another draft master plan, out for consultation until 31st October, which anticipates perhaps 8.5 million passengers by 2030 (DfT anticipates around 6.3 million). They want to grow passenger numbers from the 4.4 million by 2030 and increase aircraft movements from 62,200 to up to 87,500 – making it one of the top 10 biggest airports in the UK. There are the usual predictions of more jobs (they say the airport now “supports” (vague term) 7,800 jobs across the region and by 2030 this will rise to 10,000. The airport hopes to develop 2 business parks on land south of the runway – one to extend existing aviation-related activities such as freight, and a new site for offices. They say these have the potential to deliver “thousands more” jobs. The airport says it contributed £646m to the regional economy in 2012, and by 2030 it is estimated that this figure will “more than double.” In 2005 some 22% of passengers were on business; by the 2009 CAA air passenger survey, it was only 20% on business. ie. 80% of passengers are leisure, contributing to taking their holiday money out of the UK.      Click here to view full story…

 

Emirates considers direct flights to the USA from UK northern airports, not Heathrow

July 26, 2013     Dubai’s Emirates Airline is interested in getting into the competitive transatlantic market, and offer flights from Dubai to the US via the UK. This market is currently dominated by BA, Virgin Atlantic, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines. Emirates will need to get regulatory approval first. Emirates believes there is strong unmet demand for flights from the north of England to the USA and last year carried 800,000 passengers on its routes in and out of its hubs in the north of England: Glasgow, Newcastle, Manchester and Birmingham. There are growing numbers of Emirates passengers and services from these northern UK airports. In October, Emirates will launch flights from Dubai to New York via Milan. Their UK vice president said they are asking the Airports Commission to look at making all the regional airports completely open skies, so anyone can fly anywhere. If they use the northern airports, there is less pressure on the south east airports, and less rationale for building another runway. “Heathrow sits in the south of England, but Manchester has a bigger catchment area in terms of a two-hour drive.” If Emirates goes through with the plan BA and Virgin will be the big losers.    Click here to view full story..

 

Newcastle Airport in Court of Appeal over blame for earlier excessive bonus payments

June 21, 2013     Newcastle Airport has been at the Court of Appeal battling to convince top judges to overrule a previous decision not to punish a law firm (Eversheds) which the airport said was to blame for under-the-radar awards to its former chief executive and finance director. The airport says contracts which handed airport bosses a controversial multi-million pound pay package were “dramatically inconsistent with the principle of fair and responsible remuneration”, a judge has heard. The airport’s leadership group NIAL suffered a stinging defeat last year when a High Court judge ruled that responsibility for the debacle lay not with Eversheds LLP but with non-executive directors sitting on the company’s remuneration committee. They had inadvertently permitted the executives to “dictate” the terms of their contracts and had not read them properly before signing them.” Newcastle airport is majority-owned by 7 North East councils, who did not know about contract negotiations & bonus deals in 2005 & 2006.    Click here to view full story…

 

Airlines like Emirates keen to fly from regional airports (like Newcastle) – reducing future demand at Heathrow and Gatwick

March 25, 2013     Heathrow Airport has been saying recently that, though it is desperate to get a third runway, even they realise that there is not the demand for a 4th runway. The DfT has consistently over-estimated the amount of passenger demand over the last decade. In reality, passengers from parts of the UK other than the south east can get long haul flights from regional airports. The UK Vice President of Emirates says he wants to expand flights from UK’s regional airports, rather than Heathrow or Gatwick, and has a direct flight from Newcastle to Dubai, for transfers on from there. With that happening more and more in future, the south east airports’ dreams for expansion in the south east, requiring a massive hub airport, look less and less probable. Forecasts more than a few years ahead are based on so many uncertainties and unknowns as to be almost without value. Making best use of existing airports is more efficient than grandiose new infrastructure projects which run the risk of being white elephants. Had a second Stansted runway been built by 2012, it would now be standing idle.    Click here to view full story…

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 CAA aviation statistics    

Terminal Passengers at Newcastle airport: 

(thousands)
UK Airport Statistics: 2012 – annual  (Table 10.3)  Terminal Passengers  2002 – 2012
2013    4,415,684  ( up + 1.4% on 2012)
2012    4,354,648  (up + 0.4% on 2011)
2011    4,336,000 ( no change on 2010)
2010   4,346,893   (down – 4.9% on 2009)
2009   4,569  (down – 9% on 2008) 2008    5,017  (down -11% on 2007)
2007    5,624,000
2006    5,407,000
2005    5,187,000
2000    3,145,000
1997    2,587,000

 

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“Gatwick Diamond” accuses local MPs of community ‘disservice’ after Redhill aerodrome appeal defeat

The two Conservative MPs who publicly opposed Redhill aerodrome’s plans to build a hard runway have been accused of “doing their residents a disservice”.  Amidst the fallout of the Planning Inspectorate’s decision on 18th February to dismiss Redhill Aerodrome’s appeal for a hard runway, Jeremy Taylor, chief executive of (ardently  pro-new-runways) business group Gatwick Diamond, said Crispin Blunt MP and Sam Gyimah MP had done a disservice to residents by opposing the plans.  The Planning Inspector had rejected the airport’s appeal against repeated refusals by Reigate & Banstead Borough Council and Tandridge District Council  of plans for the 3 grass runways to be replaced by a 1,349m hard surface runway, along with approach lighting, drainage and habitat management.  The Gatwick Diamond group say a hard runway would be good for business in the area, claim jobs would be created by it, and try to scare local people that their jobs will be at risk. Mr Blunt described the airport’s business case as “disingenuous”, and Mr Gyimah said it was the wrong development in the wrong place.
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MPs accused of community ‘disservice’ following Redhill aerodrome appeal defeat

 

Opponents and supporters of Redhill Aerodrome’s hard runway appeal give their reaction to the Planning Inspectorate’s dismissal of the scheme

MP Sam Gyimah and Keep Redhill Aerodrome Green (KRAG) campaigners celebrate after the planning inspector’s decision

The two MPs who publicly opposed an aerodrome’s plans to build a hard runway have been accused of “doing their residents a disservice”.

Amidst the fallout of the Planning Inspectorate’s decision to dismiss Redhill Aerdrome’s appeal for a hard runway, Jeremy Taylor, chief executive of business group Gatwick Diamond, said Crispin Blunt and Sam Gyimah had done a disservice to residents by opposing the plans.

On February 18, planning inspector Diane Lewis dismissed the aerodrome’s attempt to overturn decisions made by Reigate & Banstead Borough Council and Tandridge District Council to refuse permission for three grass runways to be replaced by a 1,349m hard surface along with approach lighting, drainage and habitat management.

Redhill Aerodrome’s application included a business case saying the runway would lead to 120 new jobs, the protection of existing positions and an extra £27.5m to the local economy.

Speaking after the decision, Mr Taylor said: “For the surrounding economy I think it sends out completely the wrong message to any business looking to move here. I think they [the opponents] have been incredibly short sighted. I think what they fail to see is not just jobs created but existing jobs that are under threat.

“What I find really distressing is two members of the Government both very happy at the prospect of employment for voters and residents being removed.

“I think they [the MPs] have done their residents a disservice.”

Mr Taylor said the environmental impact from the runway would have been minimal as it meant the aerodrome would be a fixed length and a cap was being proposed which is not in place now.

He also warned residents that aerodrome buildings could be converted to housing without the need to submit a planning application.

Delighted

However opponents of Redhill Aerodrome’s hard runway proposal, including both Reigate MP Mr Blunt and East Surrey MP Mr Gyimah, have welcomed the Planning Inspectorate’s decision to dismiss its appeal.

The MPs, who both spoke out against the plans in the run-up to last month’s appeal, both publicly welcomed the verdict.

Mr Blunt described the business case as “disingenuous”, adding: “I am delighted that the planning inspector shares my view that we shouldn’t allow such heavy breach of national green belt policy on a weak economic argument. I’m very happy with today’s news.”

Meanwhile Mr Gyimah said: “Above all, this result is a testament to the persistent hard work of Keep Redhill Aerodrome Green (KRAG), Nutfield Parish Council, and the local residents who campaigned so strongly against this development.

“They have had the misery of fighting off speculative applications year after year, and I hope that this will be the last time they are called upon to do so.

“Both Tandridge District Council and Reigate & Banstead Borough Council recognised that this was the wrong development in the wrong place at the wrong time, and the Planning Inspectorate has rightly endorsed their position in the best interests of our community.”

Aerodrome bosses have expressed their disappointment at the inspector’s decision.

Speaking to Get Surrey, chief executive Ann Bartaby said: “The businesses here are very disappointed because a lot of people have, or had, ideas for the growth of their businesses and expanding or diversifying their businesses, which they will not be able to do.

“Our tenants are very loyal and I believe they will try to make the best of it.

“We are examining the decision of the inspector in great detail and we will probably have to live with what we have got.”

http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/local-news/mps-accused-community-disservice-following-6727727

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Earlier news about Redhill Aerodrome:

 

Redhill Aerodrome runway appeal, for a hard runway, dismissed by Planning Inspector

February 21, 2014

Plans to build a hard runway in place of its 3 existing grass runways at Redhil aerodrome have been refused by a planning inspector. The owners of Redhill Aerodrome, RAV, had wanted the hard runway in order to have aircraft movements all year, even in bad weather, and to increase the number of flights from 60,000 to 85,000 a year. Following last month’s public inquiry, the planning inspectorate ruled the development was “inappropriate” and could “harm the green belt”. Reigate and Banstead Council and Tandridge Council rejected the scheme last year, saying it was inapproprite development in Green Belt, so RAV appealed. Local residents groups and Surrey Campaign for the Protection of Rural England (CPRE) were among objectors who gave evidence to the inquiry. Local Conservative MPs Crispin Blunt and Sam Gyimah lodged formal objections against the development, saying the economic case was weak and it would cause major detrimental impacts on the surrounding area. The airfield flooded as a result of heavy storms last month.     Click here to view full story…

 

Redhill aerodrome hard runway Inquiry continues into second week

January 11, 2014

Plans to build a hard runway and associated infrastructure at Redhill Aerodrome have been under examination this week at a Public Inquiry. The inquiry will continue into next week. The aerodrome currently has two grass runways but the owners want a hard runway to allow for larger aircraft, longer flying hours and year-round flying. They have made a succession of planning applications, all of which have been refused. The airfield is wholly within the Green Belt and is reached by narrow, winding lanes. The vast majority of local residents oppose it, as do the local MPs, Parish Councils, conservation groups and Surrey Green Party. The Inquiry has been packed and lively. Officers from Reigate & Banstead and Tandridge Councils defended the decision to refuse the runway, and individuals and representatives of local groups raised a very wide range of reasons for objecting, including noise, traffic and road safety, disruption of views and flooding. Green Belt is a key issue, as is the importance of “localism” so if local people are strongly against a proposal, that should mean it is rejected. The Inspector’s decision will be made some after the end of the inquiry.     Click here to view full story…

 

Redhill aerodrome hard runway application public inquiry to last several days

January 7, 2014

Redhill Aerodrome has for years been trying to get a hard surfaced runway, to replace its current grass runway, so it can operate larger planes and it can also operate in wet weather. Their application has been rejected, most recently in June 2013 by both Tandridge and Reigate & Banstead councils. The public inquiry into the hard runway plans takes place on 7th January 2014, in Redhill, and will last several days. As well as the two district councils opposing the plans, they are also being fought by two parish councils and the local campaign group, KRAG. The extent of the damage to the Green Belt, and to the local community, is a key issue in the Inquiry. “One of the 5 purposes of Green Belt policy is to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment. The introduction of the proposed development would not assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; it would conflict with that purpose.” The jobs argument is being used by the airport’s legal team, which claims a hard runway would secure the 140 on-site jobs and create120 more jobs by 2030. The local community group, Keep Redhill Aerodrome Green branded the Aerodrome’s case as “weak” and “contains numerous assumptions, unsubstantiated statements, omissions and factors which remain unproven.”

Click here to view full story…

 

Redhill Aerodrome hard runway plans rejected

June 7, 2013   Councillors have thrown out plans for a hard runway at Redhill Aerodrome because it would “scar” the landscape. The aerodrome currently only has grass runways, so cannot operate in bad weather. But the aerodrome’s owners, RAV, say they will appeal to the Planning Inspectorate. Both Tandridge and Reigate & Banstead councils decisively rejected the plans to build a 1,349m-long concrete runway . A planning officer’s report had recommended councillors reject the scheme on the grounds of inappropriate development in the green belt. The new runway would have enabled the air field to increase air traffic movements by about 72% by flying in wet weather. The applicant had “dismally failed” to argue a case of special circumstances in order to gain approval to develop green belt. Opponents said 90% of households were against the hard surfaced runway, and a local councillor agreed with many residents in saying that there was “no merit” to the application which would “spoil the rural area” if given approval.    Click here to view full story…

 

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£25,000 of Heathrow airport “Community Fund” – much of it from passengers’ spare change – for local flood victims

Heathrow airport has a “Community Fund” which makes donations to community projects local to the airport, in Ealing , Hillingdon , Hounslow , Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead. They say they focus on projects linked to education and youth development, the environment and employment/skills development. In 2014 around £500,000 will be available through 3 distinct grant programmes.They have now announced that they are donating £25,000 for flood-stricken community groups in surrounding boroughs of the airport, to help them recover from the damage caused by the storms and flooding. Some areas only 3 – 4 miles from Heathrow have been badly flooded to a depth of many feet.   The Heathrow Community Fund donations will be made towards those with no help available from insurance or statutory funding.  The funds come from 3 sources – fines imposed on aircraft that breach noise limits, an annual donation from Heathrow and spare change from airport passengers. The noise fines are only for departing, not arriving planes, and this source of funds is used only for the “Communities for Tomorrow” activities. 
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Heathrow’s funding pot to help storm damage recovery

28 Feb 2014  (Get West London)

£25,000 funding available for flood-stricken community groups in surrounding boroughs of the airport
A huge grant has been set aside to help flood-stricken community groups in the surrounding boroughs of Heathrow to recover from the damage caused by the storms.

The airport’s £25,000 cash injection will be offered to assist voluntary organisations such as a local community hall or youth group to replace IT equipment, renovate flooded gardens or allotments, or provide new furniture lost to the storms.

The Heathrow Community Fund donations will be made towards those with no help available from insurance or statutory funding.

It is available to those in Ealing , Hillingdon , Hounslow , Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Caroline Nicholls, fund director said: “Heathrow Community Fund has helped many local community groups with grants, donating £500,000 last year alone.

“We’re now concerned that so much of their good work will be destroyed by the floods.

“When the waters have subsided and these groups are counting the cost of the damage, Heathrow Community Fund may be able to help with a donation towards the expense.”

The funds come from three sources – fines imposed on aircraft that breach noise limits, an annual donation from Heathrow and spare change from airport passengers.  [The Heathrow website about the fund at http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund/communities-together only mentions the donated change, not the noise].

Apply through the Communities Together grant stream by filling out an application form at www.heathrow.com/communityfund

Applicants will need to supply evidence of loss and quotes for the cost of replacement.

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/heathrows-funding-pot-help-storm-6758649


 

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Fears in Heathrow area that a 3rd runway with associated infrastructure could add to local flood risk

11.2.2014

The western end of Heathrow is within 3 miles of the River Thames. The western end of the airport is within 3 – 4 miles of Datchet, Old Windsor and Wraysbury, as well as Staines. These areas are currently experiencing unprecedented flooding, due to some of the wettest weather and more continuous storms and rainfall for several hundred years (which is consistent with predictions of climate change from rising global CO2 emissions). Heathrow airport itself covers a huge area in impermeable surfaces, and its storm drainage is on a vast scale. There were already fears from previous years of its impact on the drainage of  the area. It has the River Colne running along its western edge, and the River Crane along its eastern edge.  A report in 2003 for Hacan recommended that a full EIA should be carried out on the impact of a 3rd runway on the Heathrow flood plain; and that as expansion of Heathrow would have a significant impact on water levels in an area much wider than just the Heathrow flood plain a detailed analysis is carried out in the impact a 3rd runway would have on rivers across a wider area. In addition  that no decision should be made on a 3rd runway until full analysis has been done and has been put out to wide public consultation.http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=19851
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‘Noisy’ Heathrow Airport pays out nearly £600k to good causes

 

Heathrow has paid out £590,000 to groups in Hounslow, Ealing and Hillingdon, thanks in part to planes breaching noise limits

Plane flying over a house near Heathrow

The Heathrow Community Fund handed out £121,857 worth of grants to community projects across Hounslow borough during 2013.

The biggest single donation was £25,000 for the four-week Urban Ambush festival at the Watermans Art Centre, in Brentford, last summer.

A record £590,000 from the fund was shared between nine boroughs surrounding the airport, including Ealing and Hillingdon. The money came from a mixture of fines on airlines for breaching noise limits, a contribution from Heathrow Airport and donations from passengers using the airport.

Nearly 200 young people from Hounslow, Ealing and Hillingdon, many from disadvantaged backgrounds, worked with professional artists as part of Urban Ambush.

Jan Lennox, who helped run the festival, said: “The grant of £25,000 from Heathrow Community Fund was central to providing the range of activities that made the project such a great success.”

Caroline Nicholls, director of the fund, said: “This has been a record year both in terms of the number of grants we’ve awarded and the level of funds we’ve been able to donate to so many excellent community projects. It’s a privilege to be able to see at first hand the inspiring work done by dedicated local volunteers and community organisations.”

Charities in Hounslow and surrounding areas have been urged to apply for grants available this year. For more information about the scheme and how to apply, visit www.heathrow.com/communityfund.

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/noisy-heathrow-airport-pays-out-6642757

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http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund

Heathrow Community Fund

Heathrow Community Fund, run under the guidance of The Communities Trust, makes donations to community projects local to the airport.

Our focus is on projects linked to education and youth development, the environment and employment/skills development.

We also support volunteering and fundraising by airport staff.

In 2014 around £500,000 will be available through three distinct grant programmes.

Communities For Youth

Grants of up to £25,000 to support young people in their development in both education and skills development.

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Slough and Spelthorne.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities for Youth grant

Communities for Tomorrow

Grants of up to £25,000 for projects that help protect the environment or encourage sustainable development and eco education. The programme is funded by aircraft noise fines. [Only this one??]

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities for Tomorrow grant

Communities Together

Grants of up to £2,500 for a wider range of smaller community focused projects. This programme is funded in part by donations from passengers at Heathrow Airport.

Eligible boroughs: Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond, Runnymede, South Bucks, Slough, Spelthorne, Windsor and Maidenhead.

Detailed guidance on applying for a Communities Together grant

Further information about the Heathrow Community Fund

We do not as a rule support general running costs, including staff costs, preferring to fund, part fund or make a grant towards specific projects. We will not provide funds for commercial sponsorship, to individuals, for third party advertising or political campaigning.

Heathrow Community Fund Trustees meet up to four times a year to consider grant applications.

If you would like more guidance on a potential grant application please drop an email with a summary of your proposal to Kate Birch at community_fund@heathrow.com

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Heathrow airport’s website also says:

Support for charity

Charity partnership

We’ve joined forces with Oxfam to help transform lives worldwide. Our three-year partnership, which started in April 2013, will give us the chance to develop really exciting opportunities for our staff and passengers to help raise vital funds for Oxfam.

We’ve chosen a high-profile partner whose work has a truly global reach to complement our standing as the UK’s only international hub airport. The charity has over 70 years’ experience in fighting poverty globally – from life-saving response in emergencies to life-changing projects and campaigning for lasting change worldwide.

Last year Oxfam’s projects helped an amazing 15 million people in 94 countries. From accessing vital clean water, to ensuring children get to school, and giving farmers the support they need to provide for their families, Oxfam makes a big difference around the world. And that includes the UK. Oxfam works in some of the poorest parts of the country, helping around 10,000 people who don’t have enough to live on.

Our target is to raise £150,000 each year for Oxfam through staff fundraising activities and passenger collections.  [ie. none of that money comes from the airport itself !]  Email community_relations@heathrow.com or call 020 8745 5791 to find out more about Heathrow’s charitable initiatives.

http://www.heathrowairport.com/about-us/community-and-environment/community/support-for-charity

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Noise limits

Departure noise limits

Fixed noise monitors at the airport are located at approximately 6.5km from start-of-roll. This encourages aircraft operators to gain height and then reduce engine power and noise as soon as possible.

There are 12 fixed monitors around Heathrow. The location of the monitors takes account of the noise preferential routes and was decided in the early 1990s following consultation.

There are noise limits applied at these fixed noise monitors for departing aircraft.

These are:

Night quota period 11:30pm – 6am 87 dBA Lmax
Shoulder periods 11pm – 11:30pm,
6am – 7am
89 dBA Lmax
Daytime period 7am – 11pm 94 dBA Lmax

We fine airlines whose aircraft breach the noise limits. The money raised is donated to local community projects through the Noise Fines Fund.

Arrivals noise limits

There are no arrivals noise limits. In light of the findings of a report published in 1999, the then Aviation Minister decided against imposing operational noise limits for arriving aircraft.  Heathrow was, however, involved in the production of the Arrivals Code of Practice. For more information, see our arrivals factsheet.

http://www.heathrowairport.com/noise/what-we-do-about-it/measures-already-in-place/noise-limits

 

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There is some information on the level of charges for planes during the day or night  period, and in different noise Chapter categories.  Page 27 of   http://www.heathrowairport.com/static/HeathrowAboutUs/Downloads/PDF/heathrow-conditions-of-use-2014.pdf

 

The charges are around £7,800 for a Chapter 3 (noisier) plane in the daytime, and £19,500 for the same plane at night.

And around £780 for a Chapter 4 Minus 1  plane in the daytime, and £1,950 for the same plane at night.

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5% fewer flights used Munich airport in 2013 than 2012 – but airport planning 3rd runway

In Munich, campaigners against the building of a 3rd runway remain defiant in spite of a court ruling that the building of a 3rd runway would be legal. There were extraordinary scenes in the court room when the judge gave his ruling.  Campaigners, who had packed the building, all stood up and sang the Bavarian national anthem. The judge had to clear the court. The campaigners are confident that the 3rd runway may never be built because the number of aircraft using the existing runways at Munich is falling. The figures for 2013 show that though there were 0.8% more passengers using Munich airport in 2013 than in 2012, but that the number of air transport movements (flights) fell by 5%.  That is a substantial reduction. The campaign against the new runway has repeatedly questioned the economic case for building a runway for which there is not sufficient demand. For all 3 airports in Bavaria (Munich, Nuremburg and Memmingen) the number of air passengers did not grow in 2013, and the number of flights fell by 5.2%. The volume of air freight and mail using Munich airport fell by 1% in 2013. So no growing demand there.
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More passengers at Munich airport – fewer air transport movements

Less take-offs and landings in Munich, Nuremberg and Memmingen in 2013

26.2.2014 (a Bavarian statistics website)

Munich airport in 2013

Number % change from 2012
Take-offs and landings total  368 443 -5%
Passengers in 1000s  38 635 0.8%
Freight and mail (tonnes)  302 298 -1%

The Bavarian airports 1) Munich, Nuremberg and Memmingen reported to the Federal Statistical Office for the year 2013 a total of 424 300 takeoffs and landings in commercial air transportation. That was 5.2 percent less than last year. As the Bavarian State Office notifies for Statistics and Data Processing further, besides, almost 42.8 million passengers were transported. While the number of passengers increased by 1.5 percent for international flights, the number of domestic passengers decreased by 4.2 percent. The cargo and mail volume declined at these airports by 0.9 per cent to 312 263 tonnes.

The Bavarian airports Munich, Nuremberg and Memmingen reported to the Federal Statistical Office for the year 2013 a total of 424 300 takeoffs and landings in commercial air traffic and thus 5.2 percent less than last year. As the Bavarian State Office were telling for Statistics and Data Processing continues while including transit 2) almost 42.8 million passengers transported. The number of passengers on international flights grew by 1.5 percent to 32.2 million passengers, however, the number of domestic passengers decreased by 4.2 percent to 10.5 million. The cargo and mail volume declined at these airports by 0.9 per cent to 312 263 tonnes.

At Munich Bavaria’s largest airport passenger numbers rose in 2013 despite 5% decrease in take-offs and landings (368 443) to 38.6 million (+0.8 percent). Around 76 percent of the passengers came from abroad or flown abroad. The volume of cargo (including mail) was (-1.0 percent), with almost 302 300 tonnes.

Nuremberg registered more than 47,300 takeoffs and landings (-4.5 percent), the number of passengers amounted to over 3.3 million eight percent below the previous year’s level. Around 65 percent of the local passengers were foreign passengers.

The over 837 000 passengers used the airport Memmingen in 2013 were almost exclusively foreign travelers. Passenger numbers were at the airport in the Allgäu by 3.5 percent, the takeoffs and landings fell to 8546 (-17.6 percent).

 

Full data for Munich airport as well as Nuremburg and Memmingen at

https://www.statistik.bayern.de/presse/archiv/2014/44_2014.php

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Some earlier news stories about Munich airport and its plans for a 3rd runway:

 

Bavarian Administrative Court rules that building a 3rd runway at Munich airport is lawful

February 19, 2014

The Bavarian government in southern Germany have been trying for some time to get consent for a 3rd runway at Munich airport, to the north of the existing airport. The 300 or so runway opponents in the court greeted the news with boos and by singing the Bavaria national anthem. On 19th February the Bavarian Administrative Court (VGH) ruled that the runway can go ahead, when they rejected the 17 lawsuits against the project. The project was halted by a referendum in June 2012, when by a majority vote the people of Munich expressed their opposition to the runway, which would demolish the village of Attaching. However the legal judgement is not the end to the story, and the fight is expected to continue. Those opposed to the runway point out that a runway is not needed as the number of flights has fallen over recent years and the current runways have plenty of spare capacity, with the advent of larger aircraft. Though the result of the 2012 referendum was only valid for one year, the political parties in Munich are very aware if local opposition to the runway, and they need their votes. It is the state government and economic lobbies that want the runway. Opponents.will fight on.    Click here to view full story…

 


 

 

Munich campaign hands in 80,000 signature petition against 3rd runway to state parliament

July 24, 2013

On 17th July, the BUND Naturschutz (the largest environmental organisation in Germany) and the “AufgeMUCkt” Action Alliance handed in a petition to the state parliament against the construction of a third runway at Munich Airport. Nearly 80,000 people have signed the petition from all over Bavaria. The petition was handed to the Chairman of the Economic Committee (CSU) and someone from the Environment Committee at the parliament. The campaigners asked the politicians to please take note of the will of the people and decide against allowing a new runway. One campaign leader, Helga Stiegl Meier explained that, among other things, the number of aircraft movements at Munich Airport has been stagnate for years, which she said proves that there is no need for a 3rd runway. Another spokesman said the region has no need of furher aviation expansion, and sustainable transport in Bavaria is facing very different challenges, such as future supplies of cheap oil. The new parliament will have to decide after the state elections in the autumn on a third runway.     Click here to view full story…

 


 

Munich conference – airport residents’ campaigns across Europe connect their fight against the aviation lobby

25.6.2013
Over 250 people from across Europe attended the European Aviation Campaigners Conference in Munich at the weekend, where they heard accounts of campaigners against expansion in many different countries. The conference produced a manifesto which included a call for an end to night flights and an end to tax-breaks for the aviation industry.  They also called for no more runways to be  built in Europe, and a shift from short-haul flights to rail,  the abolition of subsidies for the aviation sector  and active control of noise. The conference also had sessions on effective campaigning, including direct action.   Those who attended the conference came away inspired. They were in no doubt that the conference will stimulate collective across Europe to campaign for change. The united call is to ‘tame the aviation industry’.  They say health, independent living, and an intact environment must have higher priority than economic interests. There is an English version of the Manifesto at this link.   http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=3813


 

Munich residents vote against new 3rd runway at Munich airport – 54% said NO

June 17, 2012    Munich residents voted against development of a 3rd runway, in a poll by the City of Munich, which owns 23% of the runway (state and federal government own the rest). Just over 54% of polled voters were against the new runway and 45.7% in favour, according to preliminary results of the vote on Sunday.  Though the city only owns part of the airport, this is thought to be a veto. Munich Mayor Christian Ude said he would accept the result “without ifs or buts.” Bavaria’s state government, however, said it still hopes the runway could eventually be built. Munich is Germany’s second-biggest airport. The vote has dealt another blow to airlines clamouring for growth in Germany. A German district government ruled in favour of the €1.2 billion euro Munich runway project almost a year ago. This vote shows, quote: “how difficult it has become to make clear the significance of important infrastructure projects in our country,’ according to the Munich airport chief. Click here to view full story…

 

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MoD open to RAF Leuchars, near Dundee, becoming passenger airport while remaining a military base

RAF Leuchars is a military airport in eastern Scotland, some 4 km south east of Dundee airport and about 50 km north east of Edinburgh.  The RAF are currently in the process of moving their two Typhoon squadrons from Leuchars in Fife to Lossiemouth in Moray as part of a defence review.  The MoD is now considering use of the airport for some civliian flights in addition to its use as a military base, which will continue.  Although the army will be moving to Leuchars in 2015, the base’s runway will still be in use occasionally and the control tower will have to be preserved.  Nearby Dundee airport is struggling to maintain business, partly due to its short 1,400-metre runway, compared to Leuchars’ 2,585 metres, which could cater for much bigger aircraft.  A MoD spokesman said: “The MoD is happy in principle to speak to any organisation that wishes to look into the possible use of Leuchars as a commercial airfield.”  Ryanair commented:  “We are currently in discussion with over 100 airports, so competition for Ryanair growth is fierce.” Dundee’s City Council leader opposed the idea as they are trying to get flights from Dundee to London to be successful.  Edinburgh airport is unhappy about these Dundee flights getting public subsidy.
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Leuchars to Dundee

Map showing location of Dundee and Leuchars some 4 km south east of it

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MoD open to Leuchars becoming passenger airport

RAF Leuchars Airshow in 2013. Picture: Crown Copyright

RAF Leuchars Airshow in 2013. Picture: Crown Copyright

  • by WILL LYON

SCOTLAND could be set for a new airport after military chiefs opened the door for one of their bases to be shared with commercial airlines.

The RAF are currently in the process of moving their two Typhoon squadrons from Leuchars in Fife to Lossiemouth in Moray as part of a defence review.

Although the army will be moving to Leuchars in 2015, the base’s runway will still be in use occasionally and the control tower will have to be preserved.

Nearby Dundee airport is struggling to maintain business, partly due to its short 1,400-metre runway, compared to Leuchars’ 2,585 metres, which could cater for much bigger aircraft.

And today the MOD admitted they would be open to sharing the airport with civilians.

A spokesman said: “Under the Army Re-basing Plan announced in 2013, the army is scheduled to take over Leuchars by summer 2015.

“Typhoon aircraft will transfer to RAF Lossiemouth. However, the RAF’s East of Scotland Universities Air Squadron and No 12 Air Experience Flight will remain.

“The MoD is happy in principle to speak to any organisation that wishes to look into the possible use of Leuchars as a commercial airfield.

“However, any plans would need to take into account Leuchars will continue as a military base.”

 

Ryanair

Low-cost airline Ryanair welcomed the news, along with businesses in Dundee.

A spokeswoman said: “We are currently in discussion with over 100 airports, so competition for Ryanair growth is fierce.

“However, the runway at Dundee Airport is too short for our aircraft type 737 to 800s.”

Lindsay Darroch, partner and head of property at Blackadders solicitors in Dundee, said: “I would urge Scottish and local governments to redevelop Leuchars airbase and make it an international airport.

“This to me would be an obvious next piece of the jigsaw and would have a huge impact on the local economy and the local housing market.”

Dundee University scientist Professor Sir Philip Cohen said moving Dundee airport to Leuchars would be a “huge opportunity” for the area.

He added: “A new civil airport at Leuchars would attract a huge amount of tourists as well as business traffic and would be highly viable.”

Dundee airport has struggled in recent times and just announced CityJet’s flights to London City will stop at the end of next month.

Flybe have stepped in with a temporary service to London Stansted but the city council is searching for a more concrete arrangement.

Despite Dundee airport’s problems, City Council leader Ken Guild opposed the idea of moving their business to RAF Leuchars.

He said: “To follow through on any suggestion that another ‘local’ airport should be created would be a massively expensive, time-consuming and complex undertaking.

“We have an airport at Dundee right now which has sufficient infrastructure and a long track record of handling commercial flights.

“All of our energies are currently being directed at attracting an operator to fly from Dundee to London and these will continue until that is achieved.

“When it is, I would hope that the service will be supported by the business and academic communities in the city who have a need to travel to London and the south east of England.”

http://www.scotsman.com/news/transport/mod-open-to-leuchars-becoming-passenger-airport-1-3322479

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Wikipedia information on RAF Leuchars

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Leuchars

Royal Air Force station Leuchars or more simply RAF Leuchars (IATAADXICAOEGQL) is the second most northerly air defence station in the United Kingdom (The most northerly being RAF Lossiemouth). It is located in LeucharsFife, on the east coast of Scotland, near to the university town of St Andrews.

Runways
Direction Length and surface
04/22 747 metres (2,451 ft) Asphalt
08/26 2,589 metres (8,494 ft) Asphalt
EGQL is located in Fife

On 18 July 2011 Defence Secretary Liam Fox announced that RAF Leuchars would close, whilst RAF Lossiemouth in Moray would be spared as part of the Strategic Defence and Security Review.[6] The recently formed Typhoon force, which was stood up in March 2011, will now be moved to RAF Lossiemouth in 2013[citation needed] with the Army expected to take up residence in 2015 onwards.[7]

Very little information of a closure timeline is known. Several lodger units on the station will be required to find new homes if the Army are unable to accommodate them. These include 58 Squadron of the RAF Regiment, 6 Force Protection Wing, No 612 (County of Aberdeen) Squadron RAuxAF, theEast of Scotland Universities Air Squadron incorporating 12 Air Experience Flight (who have 5 aircraft based at RAF Leuchars), and the headquarters of Scotland and Northern Ireland Region and South East Scotland Wing of the Air Training Corps.

In 2015 the army will take over and The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards will move in along with a REME Battalion and a Provost Company.[8]

 

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Edinburgh Airport anger at Dundee subsidy

Gordon Dewar. Picture: Jane Barlow

Gordon Dewar. Picture: Jane Barlow

  • by DAVID McCANN
  • 13.2.2014

THE chief executive of Edinburgh Airport has questioned a decision to subsidise flights between Dundee and London with public money – claiming the move has “implications for fair competition”.

In an open letter, Gordon Dewar called on the Dundee City Council leader to justify the use of taxpayers’ money to retain routes to Stansted Airport – branded “vital” by the authority – when Edinburgh has 44 daily flights to the English capital.

Describing Dundee Airport as “publicly owned and loss making”, Mr Dewar said the council money would be better spent supporting a direct coach service to Edinburgh Airport.

It has been reported Dundee City Council will pay half the cost of running Dundee Airport’s new stand-in service to Stansted until a new operator can take over later this year. But Dundee council chiefs are tight-lipped about the value of their investment due to “commercial confidentiality”.

In his letter, Mr Dewar said: “From an economic appraisal perspective [Dundee City Council leader Ken Guild] would appear to be considering investing taxpayers’ money in saving a maximum of one hour’s access time but offering two frequencies a day to a single airport versus 44 frequencies a day to a choice of six London airports.

“Saving one hour’s drive at the Dundee end of the journey may therefore cost hours of waiting time in London waiting for a very infrequent service.”

He said he would be interested to hear the “economic justification” for the “saving between 20 and 60 minutes per passenger valued at something of the order of £2 per trip”.

Mr Dewar called for a meeting to discuss the issue and the “implications for fair competition and private investment in infrastructure for Scotland”.

Mr Guild said the London route had played an important role in the “ongoing regeneration of Dundee”.

He said: “We are keen that this service continues for the benefit of the city.”

Aviation expert Laurie Price, from Mott MacDonald consultants, expressed sympathy for Dundee’s position, arguing that, by Mr Dewar’s reasoning, Edinburgh Airport operations should be transferred to 
Glasgow.

He said: “As a private company, of course Gordon Dewar doesn’t want this but equally why is the tram link, being developed with public money, going out to the airport? How much public money went into that?

“I would imagine the subsidy going in from Dundee for air services from London is infinitely less than the public expenditure on the Edinburgh tram.”

Transport Scotland took a very political stance, insisting it will support both airports.

“We are confident there is a place for services from Dundee,” a spokesman said. “In Scotland’s increasingly competitive aviation sector we want to secure a future for the airport.”

 

The Letter

 

Dear Councillor Guild,

 

I noted with interest the recent media coverage around the creation of a new route between Dundee and Stansted airports. In particular, I was interested in the assertion that Dundee City Council was devoting funds to making the route viable.

I have to say that given the significant travel options and minimal travel time between Dundee and the airports in Edinburgh and Aberdeen, we were surprised with the announcement the description of the route as ‘vital’.

I would seek clarification on the application of a ‘development area’ in this case and the double subsidy that a route subsidy represents when operating out of a publically owned and loss making airport.

Can I ask you to review your decision and meet with me to explore getting better connections between Dundee and Edinburgh Airport thereby using public funds more effectively?…

…Perhaps a better response to improving connectivity and accessibility through investment would be to consider supporting a direct coach service to Edinburgh Airport or perhaps seeking a route change from the existing Dundee-Edinburgh service.

It is my belief, that the cost of subsidy should be measured against the alleged ‘benefit’ of avoiding a maximum of one hour’s worth of travel, whether that is by rail or road…

…I would very much appreciate the opportunity to discuss this issue with you further where we can perhaps deal with the other issues of distortions of markets and implications for fair competition and private investment in infrastructure for Scotland.

http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/transport/edinburgh-airport-anger-at-dundee-subsidy-1-3304891

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European Commission to clarify state aid to airports – making ineligible those with over 3 million passengers per year

13.2.2014

Across Europe, State aid to small regional airports has until now been ambiguously regulated by measures that date from 1994 and 2005. Much of the aid has probably been illegal, because it has been operational aid that is used to subsidise airport fees for airlines. These savings are then passed on to customers – subsidising their flights. Budget airlines such as Ryanair have taken advantage of this situation and made a lot of profit on it, as well as encouraging artificially cheap air travel. The European Commission is now to produce new guidelines on state aid to airports and airlines, to be publicised on 19th February.  The Commission has 50 pending cases of suspected violations of state aid rules, but none has been acted upon for fear of forcing small airports to close. Large airports and airlines have complained that they are being put at a disadvantage by subsidies to their smaller competitors. It is likely that the new guidelines will only allow state aid for 10 years from now, and introduce a threshold so airports with over 3 million passengers per year are not eligible.  Environmental campaigners are angry that the guidelines will legitimise a previously illegal practice.  It will cause a growth in air travel, contrary to the aim stated by the EU’s white paper on transport of moving passengers from air to rail.http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=19947

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New studies confirm Plymouth airport not viable for aviation use

Sutton Harbour Holdings, the leaseholder, closed Plymouth airport in December 2011 and has plans to build homes, shops and offices on the site. They say there is no chance of the airport ever being reopened. Now Sutton Harbour say two expert studies it had commissioned showed that a plan by campaign group Viable to re-open the airport was “totally unrealistic”.  Viable’s plans to extend the runway and airport facilities for jets would cost at least £40million and require the demolition of homes and offices. The reports also said the proposed jet aircraft would expose 6,000 people in 2,400 homes to “annoying” noise.   Oakwood Primary School and 450 homes would require noise insulation, and other homeowners would need to be offered relocation packages at the airport operator’s expense. According to the reports, the cost of even a modest commercial re-opening would run into millions of pounds and still make a loss.”  Viable disagrees and says it will fight on.
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Studies spark new row over airport’s future

By Plymouth Herald

February 25, 2014

By KEITH ROSSITER Political Reporter @krossiter
THERE is no chance of Plymouth’s airport ever being reopened, its former operator says.

Sutton Harbour Holdings, the leaseholder, closed the airport in December 2011 and has plans to build homes, shops and offices on the site.

And yesterday the company said two expert studies it had commissioned showed that a plan by campaign group Viable to re-open the airport was “totally unrealistic”.

It said Viable’s plans to extend the runway and airport facilities for jets would cost at least £40million and require the demolition of homes and offices.

Viable last night rejected the analysis.

“It is well understood that as a business the airport was marginal but it can be made to work profitably,” Raoul Witherall its chairman, said.

SHH commissioned aviation experts Fjøri and acoustic consultants Bickerdike Allen Partners to produce studies of the airport operation.

No airline operator had been able to run a sustainable operation out of Plymouth City Airport in the past 15 years, SHH said.

The company said the two studies it commissioned highlighted the barriers to a commercially sustainable airport operation ever being re-established.

The reports said Viable’s plans to extend the runway and airport facilities for jets would cost at least £40million and require large scale demolition of nearby homes and offices due to Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) rules on minimum runway width

They said jet aircraft would expose 6,000 people in 2,400 homes to “annoying” noise.

Oakwood Primary School and 450 homes would require noise insulation, and other homeowners would need to be offered relocation packages at the airport operator’s expense

According to the reports, the cost of even a modest commercial re-opening would run into millions of pounds and still make a loss

Fjøri managing director Alex Lake said the needs of the Plymouth population could not be delivered from this location – “not now, and not in the future”.

He said: “Regional aviation has moved on, with fewer airlines operating bigger aircraft and carrying more people. The site’s constraints are simply incompatible with today’s airline industry.”

Viable’s plans for the site include reopening the airport as an unlicensed aerodrome, followed by two runway extensions to cater for jet aircraft.

SHH said Fjøri’s report showed that extending the runway to the length Viable wants would mean doubling its width to satisfy CAA rules.

This would require the realignment of Plymbridge Road, and the demolition of some 90 houses along Plymbridge Road, Blue Haze Close, Durris Close, St Marks Road, St Johns Close, Combley Drive and Rothbury Gardens, plus the demolition of offices and industrial premises at Estover.

Fjøri concludes that the runway extension alone would cost around £20million before multi-million pound property acquisition costs are taken into account, and require a further £20million investment in upgrading airport facilities, including a new terminal.

Fjøri’s Mr Lake added: “In common with many other cities like Nottingham, Sheffield, Ipswich, Swansea and York, Plymouth does not have a regional airport within its boundary. But it does have Exeter.”

Sutton Harbour Holdings chief executive Jason Schofield said: “The people of Plymouth deserve accessible, affordable and reliable air services to a range of destinations, but these reports prove that it can’t be done from this site.

“These reports also prove that Viable’s proposals are simply not feasible and in our view are an unwelcome distraction.

“It is time to move on.”

VIABLE warned that it was “reckless and short-sighted” to destroy Plymouth’s transport infrastructure.

Raoul Witherall, its chairman, said that without an airport Plymouth would struggle to be taken seriously.

“Plymouth airport can be and must be reopened to resume provision of vital connectivity.

“At a time when the vulnerability of our city’s rail links has been so visibly exposed, destroying what transport infrastructure we do have is reckless and shortsighted.

“Plymouth will pay heavily for such mistakes.”

He said Viable was not a campaign group but a special purpose vehicle business run by local business people with a primary purpose of re-opening the airport and maximising its commercial potential.

“We have a plan to re-open the airport that is sustainable and has been validated, clearly demonstrating the future profitability of a resumption of passenger services at Plymouth.”

York Aviation, which has carried out work for Plymouth City Council and Transport for London, has recently completed its own study into the passenger demand for and economic benefit of a reopened Plymouth airport for Viable.

“This report shows clear current passenger demand and substantial economic benefit to Plymouth over the life of our business plan,” Mr Witherall said.

“Viable will shortly be publishing these findings.

“With the railway severed and longer term transport solutions carrying vast price tags, Plymouth needs to reflect on its underlying connectivity deficit and the tools it has in its own hands to improve matters. “Viable will be pleased to cooperate with all parties in achieving a lasting remedy that could set our city on the path with a firmer economic outlook.”

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/Studies-spark-new-row-airport-s-future/story-20700026-detail/story.html

 

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Councillors pledge to protect Plymouth Airport site

24.9.2012

Flights from Plymouth airport stopped in July 2011. Councillors have pledged to protect Plymouth’s former airport from future development by using planning powers and by lobbying the government. A company called Sutton Harbour has a 150 year lease on the site, and closed the airport in December, saying it was no longer financially viable.  It has issued its “vision” for an urban centre which includes housing, shops, a primary school and nursing home, public spaces and a theatre venue. The airport site is protected until 2021. The council wants the site protected for airport use in future, and wants government intervention to prevent other use. But the council does not have money to subsidise it. A group of businesspeople called Viable believes the airport has a commercial future as an airport.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=507

 

 

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“Viable” urge council to buy Plymouth City Airport lease

Viable Group, which is an American investment advisor located in Texas, hopes to reopen Plymouth City Airport, and wants Plymouth City Council to buy back the lease for the site.  Viable Group claims its five-year plan could see 500,000 passengers using the airport  afer 5 years if owners, Sutton Harbour Group (SHG), would sell the lease.  Sutton bought the 150 year lease from the council in 2000. Plymouth City Council said it supported the idea in theory. Some of the land at the airport has already been earmarked for a £38m housing project. Viable wants to start off with charter services, and then go to scheduled daily domestic flights using two 19-seater planes.  Then they want a 40-metre extension to the runway, allowing 90-seater jets to connect Plymouth to Europe.

9.5.2012 (BBC)  http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=1877
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Plymouth Airport has now closed as its routes are no longer profitable

Dec 23, 2011  Plymouth Airport closed today. No aircraft will be able to use the site from this evening. The site has been used for flying since the mid-1920s.
www.airportwatch.org.uk
www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=577
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Plymouth City Airport to close in December

Apr 28, 2011   (BBC). Plymouth City Airport is to close in December, its owner has announced.  100 people were flying out of Plymouth every day.
www.airportwatch.org.uk

Air Southwest moving Plymouth flights to Cornwall for …

Jul 6, 2011  Air Southwest flights at Plymouth Airport are to be transferred to  Air Southwest said that it will transfer all of its Plymouth flights to Newquay 

www.airportwatch.org.uk/?p=3169

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New Gatwick flightpath trials are ‘destroying’ village life at Warnham, West Sussex

Residents in Warnham, about 10 km south west of Gatwick, and complaining strenuously about low-flying aircraft going over their homes from 6am each day. They feel the character of their village, let alone its tranquillity, are being destroyed.  This is part of a trial for a new new flightpath which started on February 17th and will continue for 6 months. The trial is being run by NATS in conjunction with Gatwick airport, but people in Warnham complain that they were not notified or consulted in advance of the trial. The planes pass over the village at approximately 2,000ft and villagers say they can be as frequent as every 5 minutes at some times of day.  The noise is loud enough to have raised concerns about its impact on vulnerable residents, in particular the elderly and disabled.  The Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) claims that rural residents suffer more from noise pollution than urban residents. The noise is more intrusive as there is little background noise.  GACC is concerned that the trial of the new flightpath over Warnham is designed solely to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway. “It is intolerable that new misery and decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit.”
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Warnham flight path demo

Residents of Warnham Parish (West Sussex) meet to demonstrate at new flight path trial.  Residents are very angry at suddenly finding themselves under a trial route. Warnham has never been under the flight path and are fighting to have the trial stopped.

 

New Gatwick flightpath trials are ‘destroying’ Sussex village life

5:30am Thursday 27th February 2014 in NewsBy Henry Holloway, Reporter

The Argus: Angry Warnham residents

Angry Warnham residents

Trials for a new flightpath from Gatwick Airport are “destroying” the lives of villagers.

Residents in Warnham, half an hour from Gatwick, are fed-up with low-flying aircraft going over their homes from 6am each day.

The trials, which started on February 17 and will continue for six months, are being run by National Air Traffic Services working with the airport.

Planes pass over the village at approximately 2,000ft and villagers say they can be as frequent as every five minutes.

The Argus: Angry Warnham residents
The Argus: New Gatwick flightpath trials are ‘destroying’ Sussex village life

Resident Laura Standing said: “My daughter suffers with autism, sensory processing disorder with severe stress and anxiety and any change to her surroundings has a huge impact on her.

“The sounds of the planes and the vibrations they cause going over the house have already had a massive impact on her. She feels scared and even petrified at times.”

With a population of 2,000, residents feel the tranquillity of the village is being destroyed.

Resident Orla Constant said: “Warnham has never been on the flightpath and to suddenly find that Gatwick Airport is running a six-month trial overhead without consulting any of the local residents is quite simply unbelievable.

“Warnham is a traditional and tranquil Sussex village and this has suddenly been destroyed by the bombardment of low-flying noisy planes.”

As the new flightpath is running on a trial basis, no consultation is required for change of airspace. It also has the full permission of the Civil Aviation Authority.

Resident Sally Pavey said: “It feels like we are being bombed and they are destroying the village. They just decided without giving us any thought.”

The Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) claims that rural residents suffer more from noise pollution than urban residents as they are used to the peace – saying that this factor has been acknowledged in the noise regulations used by local authorities.

Brendon Sewill, chairman of GACC, said: “GACC is concerned that the trial of the new flightpath over Warnham is designed solely to get more aircraft off the Gatwick runway.

“It is intolerable that new misery and decline in house values should be caused just to create extra profit.”

GACC is fighting against proposals for the construction of a new runway at Gatwick.

A spokeswoman for Gatwick Airport said: “The trial is part of the Future Airspace Strategy; a UK-wide programme looking at modernising airspace routes and improving the efficiency of airspace.

“The departure route, which enables aircraft to climb more quickly after take-off, reduces the overall number of people affected by aircraft noise and overflight.”

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/11038824.New_Gatwick_flightpath_trials_are__destroying__Sussex_village_life/?ref=rss

 

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Residents anger as new flight path trial takes place without consultation with those the live beneath!
Photo: Residents anger as new flight path trial takes place without consultation with those the live beneath!

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