Mallee trees to provide biomass for Virgin Australia sustainable aviation biofuel venture

Mallee trees to provide biomass for Virgin Australia sustainable aviation biofuel
venture in Western Australia

 

 13.7.2011 (Green Air Online)


Mallee trees to provide biomass for Virgin Australia sustainable aviation biofuel venture in Western Australia | Virgin Australia,mallee,CSIRO




Planting mallees can be a good option for Australian wheatbelt farmers

(photo: Oil Mallee Australia)  

 
(Mallees are a lower growing, branching form of eucalyptus.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus )

 
Virgin Australia is to partner with renewable fuel technology and agriculture
interests to develop a sustainable aviation biofuel project in Western Australia.
The consortium plans to use pyrolysis technology developed by Canadian company
Dynamotive Energy Systems to process mallees, a species of eucalypt tree that
can be grown sustainably in many parts of Australia.
 
The consortium is currently finalising plans for a demonstration unit that will
make biofuels for testing, certification and public trials. The unit is intended
to be operational in 2012, followed by construction of a commercial-scale plant
that could be operational as early as 2014, says the airline. Jet biofuels derived
from pyrolysis have not yet been approved for commercial aviation use but is a
pathway undergoing due process by certification body ASTM International, which
last week approved blended hydrotreated oil-based alternative fuels.

Dynamotive has invested in excess of $100 million over the past 10 years in developing
its fast pyrolysis technology from bench-scale through to commercial-scale plants
in Canada.

“We have a great opportunity to develop a sustainable industry in Western Australia
capable of producing second generation fuels that do not require food sources
and have positive effects on land and water management,” says Dynamotive CEO Andrew
Kingston.

According to Kevin Goss, CEO of the Future Farm Industries Co-operative Research
Centre, which is leading the mallees commercialisation, the tree can be planted
in balance with crop and livestock production in Australia’s wheatbelt region.

“As well as becoming a source of biomass for renewable energy, they offer protection
from wind erosion, help to avoid dryland salinity and provide improved livestock
shelter. They even provide habitat for native birds and mammals,” he claims.

“However, for mallee biomass to provide a diversified income stream to farmers
it requires new processors entering the market and a sharp reduction in supply
chain costs through technological change. This alliance opens up a new industry
development path.

“Just imagine if this takes off – Australian mallees fuelling jet engines; a
double win for environmental sustainability with airlines running on fuel the
production of which actually benefits the environment and farmers. It doesn’t
get much better than that.”

The company says more than 1,000 farmers have planted mallees in belts on their
farms, mainly in Western Australia, and will be bringing a prototype hardwood
biomass harvester, the world’s first it says, to the state for wide-scale demonstrations
later this year.

A fourth member of the consortium is Renewable Oil Corporation, which is Dynamotive’s
Australian partner and develops pyrolysis biofuel projects in the country. The
privately-funded company has investors in Australia, Canada and Europe.

Commenting on the project, Virgin Australia CEO John Borghetti said: “Over the
past few years we have been working with stakeholders across the industry to research
and develop bio-derived renewable fuels that can be used to progressively replace
conventional aviation fuels.

“We believe this new project has great potential given the results with the technology
and the availability of this unique Australian feedstock. It is also particularly
attractive to Virgin Australia because it aligns with our commitment to supporting
the Australian economy and environment, and encouraging Australian innovation.”

A recent report by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
Australia’s national science agency, demonstrated in a roadmap scenario how the
Australian aviation sector could achieve a 5% biofuel share in their total fuel
use by 2020, expanding to 40% by 2050. The report concluded there should be sufficient
local biomass to support 46% of aviation biofuel needs by 2020 and over 100% by
2050
  (see article).
 

Links:

Virgin Australia – Sustainability

Dynamotive Energy Systems Corporation

Renewable Oil Corporation

Future Farm Industries

http://www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=1297

 

Read more »

Theresa Vlliers gives her support to aviation biofuels, including Thomson cooking oil flights


Thomson Airways to become first UK sustainable jet biofuels operator as it announces
start of weekly flights

 

1.7.2011   (GreenAir Online) 

  

 

UK holiday airline Thomson Airways is to operate the UK’s first sustainable biofuel
commercial flight at the end of this month and start regular weekly flights from
September on routes from Birmingham.

A 50/50 blend of used cooking oil [which includes animal fat – tallow] and regular
jet kerosene is being supplied by Netherlands-based SkyNRG, which has sourced
the biofuel from Dynamic Fuels in the United States.. It will be the same blend
of fuel as that used on a KLM flight from Amsterdam to Paris earlier this week.

Thomson called on the UK and EU governments to help reduce the significant premium
of sustainable aviation biofuels over conventional fuels by incentivising investment.
Welcoming the airline’s announcement and the aviation industry’s drive towards
technological change, UK Aviation Minister Theresa Villiers said the fuels had
a role to play in efforts to tackle climate change.

The first flight to use the biofuel will take place on July 28 on a journey from
Birmingham to Palma, once a stringent testing process has been completed and final
safety clearance has been received. Although hydro-processed, or so-called HEFA,
fuels have been approved by standards body ASTM International for commercial use,
final rubber-stamping is still to be completed over the coming weeks.

At this stage, the plan is to operate weekly biofuel flights for one year from
Birmingham to Palma in the summer and from Birmingham to Alicante in the winter,
using a Rolls-Royce-powered Boeing 757-200. The airline says that as the fuels
become more commercially viable, it plans to use them across its fleet over the
next three years.

Birmingham Airport will be supporting the operation through provision of a dedicated
fuel truck, independent oversight and storage infrastructure.

The airline says it has placed sustainability in aviation at the top of its list
of priorities and the biofuel had undergone rigorous sustainability testing in
line with the requirements set out by the Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels (RSB).

“Sustainable biofuels offer us the opportunity to improve our own individual
environmental performance as well as contributing to the UK’s carbon reduction
target,” said Chris Browne, Managing Director of Thomson Airways.

“Sustainability is key to this investment,” added the airline’s Environment Manager,
Deirdre Kotze. “SkyNRG’s robust approach on this matter played a big role in giving
them our confidence.”

Set up as a consortium by KLM two years ago, SkyNRG is advised by an independent
Sustainability Board comprising of two environmental NGOs [ these are WWF International
and IUCN  – see below ] and an academic institute, and is an active supporter
of the RSB. The company describes itself as a one-stop shop for airlines, integrating
the complete feedstock-to-flight supply chain process.

“We have tried to make the entry barrier for airlines to embrace this new fuel
era as low as possible,” said Dirk Kronemeijer, SkyNRG’s Managing Director. “Being
selected as supplier for Thomson Airways is therefore a big deal for us as it
proves that we are on the right track to help create this industry.”

However, Thomson says the significant premium attached to sustainable aviation
biofuels was itself unsustainable for the airline industry.

“We urge UK and EU governments to use this opportunity to review the legislation
and remove the barriers around sustainable biofuels so that other airlines can
follow our lead,” said Browne. [In  other words, please give the aviation industry yet another handout and/or
tax break].

Welcoming the Thomson Airways announcement, UK Aviation Minister Theresa Villiers
said: “I wish them well with this project. The government believes that sustainable
biofuels have a role to play in efforts to tackle climate change, particularly
in sectors where no other viable low carbon energy source has been identified
– as is the case with aviation.

“We want aviation to flourish and grow but we have also been clear that the environmental
impacts of flying must be addressed. I welcome the efforts being made by the UK
aviation and aerospace industries to drive forward the technological change we
need to tackle this challenge effectively.”

As part of the TUI Travel airline group, Thomson Airways has committed to reducing
carbon emissions by 6% between 2008 and 2014. Operating with one of the highest
load factors in the UK industry, it claims to be amongst the most efficient. The
airline is the UK launch customer for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, with the first
aircraft due to be delivered next year. The Dreamliner is expected to be 20% more
fuel efficient than similar sized commercial aircraft.

Links:

Thomson Airways

TUI Group – Sustainable Development

SkyNRG

Dynamic Fuels

http://www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=1274
see also

Chipping in to help the environment: Thomson Airways launches aircraft powered
by COOKING OIL (Mail)

1.7.2011  By Daily Mail Reporter
Next month, Thomson Airways will become Britain’s first airline to fly customers
on biofuel – in this case cooking oil – when it operates a service to Spain.

The airline, owned by Europe’s biggest tour operator TUI Travel , said it planned
to operate the flight from Birmingham to Palma, Mallorca, on July 28 once final
safety clearance was received.
        

Flights will operate on a 50/50 blend of Jet A1 fuel and hydroprocessed esters
and fatty acids (HEFA) fuel — made from used cooking oil

After that weekly flights to Spain using biofuel will begin in September for
a year, on the same route initially and switching to Birmingham-Alicante during
the winter schedule.

Thomson said the flights would operate on a 50/50 blend of Jet A1 fuel and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids (HEFA) fuel — made from used cooking oil.

Dutch airline KLM operated the world’s first scheduled biokerosene-powered flight
on Wednesday after one of its Boeing 737-800 jets flew 171 passengers between
Amsterdam and Paris, using the same cooking oil-Jet-A mix that Thomson plans to
use.  [50% biofuel in each engine].

KLM, which merged with Air France in 2004, operated a one-off passenger flight
using biofuels in 2009 – the world’s first – and now plans to launch scheduled
biokerosene-fuelled services between Holland and France in September.

Thomson managing director Chris Browne said: ‘As sustainable biofuels become
more commercially viable, Thomson Airways plans to expand its use of sustainable
biofuels across its fleet over the next three years.’   [This will not be using used cooking oil – there is simply not enough of it,
and what there is already gets put to use on the ground].

European airlines, biofuel producers and the EU Commission last week signed up
to produce 2 million tonnes of biofuel for aviation by 2020.

While airlines are keen to use biofuels as a way of cutting down on pollution,
the use of food crops, such as palm oil, in their production has come under fire
for taking land that could be used to feed people.

Thomson said the fuel for its maiden biofuel-powered flight would be supplied
by Dutch company, SkyNRG, which is advised by an independent sustainability board.

Sustainable biofuels costs significant more than regular jet fuel and is a premium
that the airline industry cannot sustain today.

‘The British government believes that sustainable biofuels have a role to play
in efforts to tackle climate change, particularly in sectors where no other viable
low carbon energy source has been identified — as is the case with aviation,’
aviation minister Theresa Villiers said.

Using biofuels will help Thomson meet owner TUI Travel’s plan to reduce the carbon emissions from its airlines by 6 per cent
from 2008-14.

 
 
 
In practice there is nowhere near enough used cooking oil available to fuel planes,
other than as a publicity gimmick.  Most of the used oil is already used as biodiesel
for land vehicles, and other uses. There is nowhere like enough used oil to fuel
the road vehicles that would like to use it now.
BBC   July 2008
There’s simply not enough cooking oil in the UK to take over from diesel entirely
according to the government’s
Better Regulation Commission. Current waste oil supplies could only feasibly power around one-350th of the
UK’s cars. In fact, the Energy Systems Research Unit estimates that the UK can
only produce enough
biodiesel from waste veggie oil to displace less than 0.6% of conventional diesel.
see also

KLM operates first scheduled flight on 50% biokerosene from used cooking oil
in both engines

Date Added: 30th June 2011

 

KLM has became the first airline to operate a commercial flight carrying 171
passengers on 50% biokerosene. A Boeing 737-800 flew from Schiphol to Paris. 
KLM says they 
would be operating more than 200 flights to Paris on biokerosene in September.
The fuel was supplied by Dynamic Fuels via SkyNRG, the consortium co-founded by
KLM in 2009. “KLM is open to using different raw materials …. as long as they
meet a range of sustainability criteria”.
Click here to view full story…
 
and
 
 

KLM to launch commercial flights in September Amsterdam – Paris on biofuel (?
used cooking oil ?)

Date Added: 23rd June 2011

 

KLM says it will fly more than 200 flights between Amsterdam and Paris on biokerosene
made from used cooking oil.   It does not say what percent of the fuel the used
oil will be. KLM then says it will use other fuels too, as long as they meet their
sustainability criteria and include substantial CO2 reductions.  In practice there
is nowhere near enough used cooking oil available, most of which is already used
as biodiesel for land vehicles, and other uses.

Click here to view full story…
More news stories on aviation and biofuels

Read more »

Lufthansa A321 partially powered (50%) by biofuel to enter service Friday

12.7.2011 (Air Transport World, ATW)
 


 
Lufthansa plans start its scheduled biofuel flights Friday, launching a six-month
trial in which an IAE V2500-powered Airbus A321 will operate on the Frankfurt-Hamburg
route.
The A321, which will use a 50-50 mix of biofuel and traditional kerosene in one
of its engines, is slated to operate eight daily legs between FRA and HAM. LH
estimates it will save around 1,500 tons of carbon dioxide emissions over the
six months. [It gives no clue about the source of the fuel, or how the carbon
savings are calculated].
 
LH initially announced the flights last year (ATW Daily News, Nov. 30, 2010) but had to wait for certification.

The aircraft will be refueled at HAM, where the biofuel is expected to be delivered
from Finland’s Nestle Oil. Several German media outlets reported that operating
the A321 partially powered by biofuel for half a year will cost €6.5 million ($9.26
million), €2.5 million of which will be paid by the German government.

Separately, LH said that it will this fall start using new transport containers
made of a light plastic material to hold both cargo and luggage on the lower deck
of aircraft. “The new containers, up to 15% lighter than their predecessors, are
a true benefit for the environment in that kerosene consumption can be lowered
by approximately 2,180 tons per year and Lufthansa will save 6,867 tons of” CO2
emissions, LH stated. Some 5,000 containers are slated to be replaced.

Lufthansa Cargo and Jettainer, an LH Cargo subsidiary, have carried out onboard
testing of the new containers, the airline noted.
 
http://atwonline.com/eco-aviation/news/lufthansa-a321-partially-powered-biofuel-enter-service-friday-0711?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AtwDailyNews+%28ATW+Daily+News%29

Biofuels used in the EU are excluded from fuel calculations  under the EU ETS, so are not counted towards
carbon totals, as will be the case when aviation joins the ETS on 1.1.2012.  So
the use of bio fuels, no matter how expensive in carbon terms to produce (the
carbon used is accounted for in other sectors, such as agriculture, transport
or processing industry) or how environmentally damaging, will save the airlines
a great deal of money from next  year.
 
http://www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=757
 
 
 
see also Guardian  8.7.2011
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jul/08/lufthansa-airline-biofuels-flight-germany
 
 
see earlier
 
 
Aviation biofuels on verge of official certification and may fly at Paris air
show

Certifying body ASTM International looks set to approve the use of hydrotreated
renewable jet (HRJ) fuel for use in commercial aviation, opening up the possibility
for biofuel-powered flights to operate during the 2011
Paris air show which starts on 20th June. It is not known which airline might be using biofuel
at the show. It is not yet known when Lufthansa will start its flights using 50%
biofuel, between Frankfurt and Hamburg.

 
9.6.2011 (Flightglobal) 

Certifying body ASTM International looks set to approve the use of hydrotreated
renewable jet (HRJ) fuel for use in commercial aviation, opening up the possibility
for biofuel-powered flights to operate during the 2011 Paris air show.

A deciding ballot passed through ASTM’s relevant technical committees on 8 June.

While approval has not been made official yet, Richard Altman, executive director
of the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI), told ATI and
Flightglobal that “from a practical point of view, we are done”.

Once approval is officially given, it clears the way for airlines such as Lufthansa to begin operating flights using a biofuel blend.

Lufthansa had originally planned to begin a six-month trial in April 2011, operating
its Frankfurt-Hamburg route using an International Aero Engines-powered
Airbus A321 with one of its engines running on a 50/50 blend of biofuel derived from
vegetable oil.

However, it was forced to put the plan on hold because the fuel was not certified
in time by regulators.

If ASTM approval becomes official, it will also give the green light for airlines
to operate biofuel-powered flights during the 2011 Paris air show – something
that has been planned in the hope that certification happens before the show begins
on 20 June.

“We’re hoping to get all procedural matters sorted before the air show. If this
happens it opens the prospect for aircraft to fly in on that fuel,” said Altman.
“We’re planning to have a physical presence of aircraft flying this fuel.”

It is not known which airline will conduct the biofuel-powered flight at Paris,
however Lufthansa said it will not be the carrier.
 

Read more »

BioJet to release 1 billion gallons of jet fuel in the USA

8.7.2011 (Air Transport World – ATW)

By Christine Boynton

(This article gives no clue as to the soure of the fuel)

On the heels of the recent ASTM International Committee on Petroleum Products
and Lubricants’ approval of bio-derived jet fuel for commercial use, Santa Barbara-based
BioJet International announced it will release one billion gallons of renewable
jet fuel priced at $2.97 a gallon to airlines to “aid in the development” of biofuel
in the commercial aviation market.  [The current price of jet fuel, according to IATA, is about $299 per gallon http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/economics/fuel_monitor/Pages/index.aspx  ]

“This offer is made possible because BioJet, through its subsidiaries, owns and
controls multiple, very large biofuels feedstock projects around the world,” the
company said. “This unique position provides BioJet with the ability to control
its internal allocation of resources for a significant cost control advantage
while other companies are subject to severe fluctuations in cost and availability
of feedstock.”

Under new provisions included in ATSM standard D7566, up to 50% bio-derived synthetic
blending components can be added to conventional commercial and military jet or
gas turbine fuel. D7566 also includes new, specific requirements for the bio-derived
synthetic fuel component such as thermal stability, distillation control and trace
material amounts. The specification was provisionally approved in June (ATW Daily
News, June 13) and received full approval July 1.

US Air Transport Assn. VP and Chief Economist John Heimlich said US “airlines
commend ASTM for this critical and significant step, which brings the airline
industry one step closer to meeting our environmental goals of widespread production
of cleaner, alternative fuels while enhancing energy supply security and competitiveness.”

BioJet in February received a $1.2 billion funding facility from Equity Partners
Fund (ATW Daily News, Feb. 15), a sum it calls “the cornerstone” of a $6 billion,
10-year supply chain capital projects program, which will include feedstock, refining
projects, investment and strategic acquisitions.

US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack last month told ATW that if a market develops
for biofuel to power aircraft, the infrastructure to produce and distribute it
will quickly build up (ATW’s Eco-Aviation Today, June 27).

http://atwonline.com/eco-aviation/news/biojet-release-1-billion-gallons-jet-fuel-0707?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AtwDailyNews+%28ATW+Daily+News%29

 

Comments:

Annual U.S. domestic consumption of jet fuel in 2008 was around 13 billion gallons.
If this company has 1 billion gallons of biofuel to sell at about $3 a gallon,
that’s going to get some attention. According to Airnav.com, 2011 average prices
for jet-a is $5.42 a gallon. Now, if only the airlines will pass on some of the
savings.

Didn’t say they were making money at $3 Maybe they’re giving it away to build
market   Might cost $10 plus
 
 
 
 
 
Biojet’s website says:
 
The primary issue in any biofuel is the feedstock source. The Company is fundamentally
agnostic with regard to feedstocks and is committed to utilizing any and all sustainable
and economically viable sources in the fulfillment of its mission, making it relatively
unique among renewable jet fuel producers. These include jatropha, camelina, algae,
waste biomass and designer sources. The Company holds world class expertise and
experience in jatropha. The Company also has camelina cultivation/refining under
development in Argentina and is in the planning stages for large camelina projects
in Eastern Europe in the U.S. through its joint ventures. The Company also recently
entered into a joint venture agreement with a leading Algae developer and maintains
relationships with Waste Biomass and Designer feedstock developers such that it
will be diversified across all the major potential sources of feedstock and refining
technologies.
http://www.biojetcorp.com/feedstocks.php

Read more »

Pressure mounts over biofuels – they should not be classed as zero-carbon under the EU ETS

1.7.2011 (Aviation Environment Federation)

A report has been published by ClientEarth, reflecting mounting concerns over
the use of biofuels as a substitute for fossil fuel. Not only are there serious
concerns about land use, competition with food and deforestation, but analysis
shows that biofuels are often nowhere near carbon-neutral. When a full lifecycle
analysis is carried out, the total emissions can be comparable or even higher
than those from burning fossil fuel.

The European Emissions Trading System (ETS) requires industries covered by the
scheme to report and surrender permits for emissions from burning fossil fuels.
But biofuels are currently exempted so the system of capping, the main mechanism
to control emissions, has a potentially large loophole.

The report by ClientEarth is called ‘Bringing the ETS in line with reality: Making
biomass emissions count through the Monitoring and Reporting Regulation.’ It says
that “ .. the current application of a zero-emission factor to emissions from
biomass used in sectors covered by the ETS does not accurately reflect actual
emissions from biomass and is, moreover, contrary to the principle underlying
the ETS that each operator should be responsible for his own emissions.”

The briefing concludes that the Commission should delete the zero-emission factor
for biomass and that it can do so under current legislation for operators using
biomass as part of a broader fuel mix are concerned. Where pure biofuel is used
however, a legislative procedure may be required to amend the relevant ETS Directive.
The report can be found at 
http://www.clientearth.org/climate-forests-publications 

Use of biofuels is highly relevant to aviation, with aviation due to join the
ETS in 2012 and the industry seeking rapid expansion despite all the concerns
about climate change. The biofuel issue is complex, but AEF is supportive of the
principle that biofuels should be recognised under ETS as having non-zero carbon
emissions and should be treated accordingly in caps and permits.

The aviation industry expects uptake of biofuels to be slow and has indicated
that it is only really interested in ‘third generation’ biofuels which will not
compete with food production. But now is the time to get ETS right, especially
as decisions on how biofuel is made will be taken by manufacturers around the
world and not by airlines or the EU.

http://www.aef.org.uk/?p=1263

Read more »

Chipping in to help the environment: Thomson Airways launches aircraft powered by COOKING OIL (Mail)

1.7.2011  By Daily Mail Reporter

Next month, Thomson Airways will become Britain’s first airline to fly customers
on biofuel – in this case cooking oil – when it operates a service to Spain.

The airline, owned by Europe’s biggest tour operator TUI Travel , said it planned
to operate the flight from Birmingham to Palma, Mallorca, on July 28 once final
safety clearance was received.
        

Flights will operate on a 50/50 blend of Jet A1 fuel and hydroprocessed esters
and fatty acids (HEFA) fuel — made from used cooking oil

After that weekly flights to Spain using biofuel will begin in September for
a year, on the same route initially and switching to Birmingham-Alicante during
the winter schedule.

Thomson said the flights would operate on a 50/50 blend of Jet A1 fuel and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids (HEFA) fuel — made from used cooking oil.

Dutch airline KLM operated the world’s first scheduled biokerosene-powered flight
on Wednesday after one of its Boeing 737-800 jets flew 171 passengers between
Amsterdam and Paris, using the same cooking oil-Jet-A mix that Thomson plans to
use.  [50% biofuel in each engine].

KLM, which merged with Air France in 2004, operated a one-off passenger flight
using biofuels in 2009 – the world’s first – and now plans to launch scheduled
biokerosene-fuelled services between Holland and France in September.

Thomson managing director Chris Browne said: ‘As sustainable biofuels become
more commercially viable, Thomson Airways plans to expand its use of sustainable
biofuels across its fleet over the next three years.’   [This will not be using used cooking oil – there is simply not enough of it,
and what there is already gets put to use on the ground].

European airlines, biofuel producers and the EU Commission last week signed up
to produce 2 million tonnes of biofuel for aviation by 2020.

While airlines are keen to use biofuels as a way of cutting down on pollution,
the use of food crops, such as palm oil, in their production has come under fire
for taking land that could be used to feed people.

Thomson said the fuel for its maiden biofuel-powered flight would be supplied
by Dutch company, SkyNRG, which is advised by an independent sustainability board.

Sustainable biofuels costs significant more than regular jet fuel and is a premium
that the airline industry cannot sustain today.

‘The British government believes that sustainable biofuels have a role to play
in efforts to tackle climate change, particularly in sectors where no other viable
low carbon energy source has been identified — as is the case with aviation,’
aviation minister Theresa Villiers said.

Using biofuels will help Thomson meet owner TUI Travel’s plan to reduce the carbon emissions from its airlines by 6 per cent
from 2008-14.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2010136/Chipping-help-environment-Thomson-Airways-launches-aircraft-powered-COOKING-OIL.html?ITO=1490
In practice there is nowhere near enough used cooking oil available to fuel planes,
other than as a publicity gimmick.  Most of the used oil is already used as biodiesel
for land vehicles, and other uses. There is nowhere like enough used oil to fuel
the road vehicles that would like to use it now.
BBC   July 2008
There’s simply not enough cooking oil in the UK to take over from diesel entirely
according to the government’s
Better Regulation Commission. Current waste oil supplies could only feasibly power around one-350th of the
UK’s cars. In fact, the Energy Systems Research Unit estimates that the UK can
only produce enough
biodiesel from waste veggie oil to displace less than 0.6% of conventional diesel.
see also

KLM operates first scheduled flight on 50% biokerosene from used cooking oil
in both engines

Date Added: 30th June 2011

 

KLM has became the first airline to operate a commercial flight carrying 171
passengers on 50% biokerosene. A Boeing 737-800 flew from Schiphol to Paris. 
KLM says they 
would be operating more than 200 flights to Paris on biokerosene in September.
The fuel was supplied by Dynamic Fuels via SkyNRG, the consortium co-founded by
KLM in 2009. “KLM is open to using different raw materials …. as long as they
meet a range of sustainability criteria”.
Click here to view full story…
 
and
 
 

KLM to launch commercial flights in September Amsterdam – Paris on biofuel (?
used cooking oil ?)

Date Added: 23rd June 2011

 

KLM says it will fly more than 200 flights between Amsterdam and Paris on biokerosene
made from used cooking oil.   It does not say what percent of the fuel the used
oil will be. KLM then says it will use other fuels too, as long as they meet their
sustainability criteria and include substantial CO2 reductions.  In practice there
is nowhere near enough used cooking oil available, most of which is already used
as biodiesel for land vehicles, and other uses.

Click here to view full story…
More news stories on aviation and biofuels

Posted: Saturday, July 2nd, 2011. Filed in Biofuels News.

Read more »

KLM operates first scheduled flight on 50% biokerosene from used cooking oil in both engines

“KLM operates first scheduled flight on biokerosene”
 
29.6.2011 (KLM press release)
 


 
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines today became the first airline in the world to operate
a commercial flight carrying 171 passengers on biokerosene. Flight KL1233 – a
Boeing 737-800 – took off this afternoon at 12:30 hours from Schiphol bound for
Charles de Gaulle in Paris carrying 171 passengers. State Secretary of Infrastructure
and the Environment, Joop Atsma, was present for the flight’s departure.
 
Amstelveen
 
“Last week we announced that we would be operating more than 200 flights to Paris
on biokerosene in September this year. Today, KLM wrote history! KLM is ready
and today we were pleased to show just that,” said Managing Director of KLM, Camiel
Eurlings shortly before departing for Paris.

In taking this initiative, KLM leads the world in showing that innovation and
sustainability are inextricably linked. “It will be interesting to follow and
stimulate the further development of biofuels. In taking this step, KLM clearly
shows the value of finding clever ways to use waste derived from producers and
consumers,” said State Secretary of Infrastructure and the Environment, Joop Atsma.

The Inspectorate for Transport, Public Works and Water Management (Inspectie
Verkeer en Waterstaat – IVW) granted KLM permission to operate the flight. Aircraft
manufacturer Boeing was also closely involved in making this first flight possible.

KLM’s first commercial flight to Paris was operated on biokerosene produced from used cooking oil. This same raw material will be used in the flights scheduled for September.
The fuel was supplied by Dynamic Fuels via SkyNRG, the consortium co-founded by
KLM in 2009 with the North Sea Group and Spring Associates.

KLM is open to using different raw materials for the end product, as long as
they meet a range of sustainability criteria, including substantial reductions
in CO2 emissions and minimum negative impact on biodiversity and food supply.
All biofuels used by KLM also have to meet precisely the same technical specifications
as traditional kerosene and must not require any adjustments to aircraft engines
or infrastructure.

KLM has been committed to developing sustainable biofuel since 2007. Air France
KLM is also an industry leader in the field of fuel efficiency. Air France KLM
has been sector leader of de Dow Jones Sustainability Index for six successive
years.

For more information:

KLM Media Relations, tel. + (31) 020 – 649 45 45

 
http://www.klm.com/corporate/en/newsroom/press-releases/archive-2011/KLM_operates_first_scheduled_flight_on_biokerosene.html
 
 
[The press office confirmed that the plane used, and will continue to use, 50%
biofuel in each of its two engines – and will do so in September].
 
 
 
 
see also
 
 
GreenAir online article.   2.7.2011
http://www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=1269
 
 
 
see also
 
 
 
 
KLM press release on 22.6.2011
 

KLM launches commercial flights Amsterdam – Paris on biofuel

 
AMSTELVEEN, 22 June 2011 – KLM Royal Dutch Airlines has taken another important
step in aviation sustainability. In September KLM will launch more than 200 flights
being operated on biokerosene between Amsterdam and Paris. “KLM has once again
shown it is stimulating the development of biokerosene”, according to managing
director Camiel Eurlings. “In November 2009 we demonstrated that it was technically
possible to fly on biokerosene. Now, a year and a half after our first demonstration
flight on Camelina, a new phase has been entered around the world, that of certification.
Authorisation will soon be granted to operate commercial flights on biofuel. I
am especially proud to announce that KLM will take this substantial step in September”.

The flights will be operated on biofuel made from Used Cooking Oil. KLM is open
to using different raw materials for the end product, as long as they meet a range
of sustainability criteria, including substantial reductions in CO2 emissions
and minimum negative impact on biodiversity and food supply. All biofuels used
by KLM also have to meet precisely the same technical specifications as traditional
kerosene and must not require any adjustments to aircraft engines or infrastructure. 

The fuel is produced by Dynamic Fuels and supplied by SkyNRG, the consortium
launched by KLM and North Sea Group and Spring Associates in 2009. SkyNRG is actively
developing a sustainable production chain for aviation biofuels. The sustainability
of alternative kerosene depends on many factors and is assessed on a case-by-case
basis. In order to be able in future to reach the right decisions in this area,
SkyNRG is advised by an independent Sustainability Board, consisting of the Dutch
wing of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Solidaridad, and the Copernicus
Institute of the University of Utrecht. A positive recommendation from the Sustainability
Board carries a lot of weight for KLM.

KLM also supports the view published in the WWF’s Energy Report ( 100% Renewable energy by 2050 ) which indicates that alternative fuels made from biomass are the only appropriate
replacement for fossil fuels for such sectors as the airline industry. Eurlings:
“The route to 100% sustainable energy is enormously challenging. The costs of
biofuels need to come down substantially and permanently. This can be achieved
through innovation, collaboration and the right legislation that stimulates biofuel
in the airline industry, but with an eye on honest competition. We really need
to move forward together to attain continuous access to sustainable fuel”.

 KLM has been committed to developing sustainable biofuel since 2007. Air France
KLM is also an industry leader in the field of fuel efficiency. Air France KLM
has been sector leader of de Dow Jones Sustainability Index for six successive
years.

For more information:

KLM Media Relations, tel. + (31) 020 – 649 45 45

 
 
 
 
see also
 

KLM flies world’s first ‘passenger flight on biofuel’ (camelina)

November 23, 2009   (Physorg)
  

The KLM airplane which runs on biokerosene is seen at Schiphol airport, near Amsterdam 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The KLM airplane which runs on biokerosene is seen at Schiphol airport, near
Amsterdam. A Boeing 747, one of four engines powered by a 50-percent biokerosene
mix, circled the Netherlands for an hour on Monday for what airline KLM called
the world’s first passenger flight using biofuel.
 
A Boeing 747, one of four engines powered by a 50-percent biokerosene mix, circled
the Netherlands for an hour on Monday for what airline KLM called the world’s
first passenger flight using biofuel.
 
“This is technically feasible. We have demonstrated that it is possible,” KLM
chief executive officer Peter Hartman said after the
, which took off and landed at Schiphol airport near Amsterdam.

“Government, industry and society at large must now join forces to ensure that
we quickly gain access to a continuous supply of biofuel.”

The flight had about 40 people on board, including Hartman, Economic Affairs
Minister Maria van der Hoeven, the director of nature group WWF in the Netherlands,
Johan van de Gronden, and a handful of journalists.

KLM spokeswoman Monique Matze told AFP that of the Boeing’s four engines, one
was powered by a mix of 50 percent sustainable kerosene and 50 percent normal
fuel. The biofuel was manufactured from the camelina plant, sourced from a biotechnology company based in Seattle in the United States.

The was also the first of any kind in Europe powered partly by sustainable biofuel,
according to KLM.

“Of course, we compensated the footprint of transporting the fuel from the United
States to here,” added Matze, citing ongoing projects to reduce
.

KLM said its quest for biokerosene was conditional on forests, food and water
sources not being jeopardised.

Matze said the company “dare not name any targets” for switching to for its commercial flights, saying “the difficulty now is the availability of
biofuels.”

Monday’s flight, she said, was “the first step towards ensuring clean and sustainable
air transport.”

(c) 2009 AFP
 
http://www.physorg.com/news178223585.html
 
 
 
 
More news stories on aviation and biofuels

Posted: Thursday, June 30th, 2011. Filed in Biofuels News.

Read more »

Momentum gathering towards aviation biofuels commercialisation as US and European policy-makers signal support

27.6.2011 (GreenAir online)

The momentum driving the introduction of aviation biofuels received a significant
boost with a number of initiatives and events taking place at last week’s Paris
Air Show.
 
While the transatlantic biofuel flights conducted by Boeing and Honeywell attracted
wide attention and media column inches (
see article), it was the announcements behind the scenes that offered more substance on
progress towards a viable alternative jet fuel industry.
 
A high-profile visit by the US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, along with
officials from the US Department of Commerce and the European Commission, to the
Alternative Aviation Fuels Showcase taking place in one of the exhibition halls
added weight to growing optimism from the aviation and biofuels sectors that policy-makers are getting behind a drive to implement a coherent strategy towards
large-scale commercialisation of sustainable aviation biofuels production in Europe
and the US.

Vilsack told an audience of airline and aerospace executives that the US Department
of Agriculture (USDA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were making
major concerted efforts to find alternative aviation fuel opportunities. “We understand
how significant this is to the industry,” he said.

“The question is whether there is a sustainable way for us to meet aviation’s
fuel needs of the future. The USDA is excited about the opportunities presented
by the requirement for aviation biofuels as it provides an opportunity for farmers
to diversify income, and to take non-productive land which can be used for fuel
feedstocks.”

He said five ‘virtual’ research centres would be collaborating with universities
and the private sector to identify potentially efficient and workable feedstocks.

“We also recognise that in order for this to work we must have the refineries
and the capacity to produce these fuels so we are working through the Farm Bill
programme to provide loan guarantees to companies to assure their bankers as they
make the several hundred million dollar investment to build commercial-size biorefineries
that they have a partner in the USDA to provide the security to reduce the risk,”
he said.

Vilsack added that this would in turn create job opportunities in both the construction
and the operation of the facilities. “This is also important because they will
likely be located in rural areas across the country and many of America’s farm
producers today require off-farm income to keep their farms.

“We also have to incentivise the [feedstock] producers to think differently about
their own farming operations and for that reason we established the Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) to provide resources to farmers to produce these new feedstocks on their lands
and offset some of the expense of planting and growing a new crop, and over the
next couple of years make it profitable for them to do this.”

He said BCAP project awards were being made across a number of states as part
of a five-year commitment, with each project covering areas of roughly 50,000
acres (20,200 hectares) and the growing of feedstocks including camelina and miscanthus.

“It is an exciting partnership we have with the aviation industry,” said Vilsack.
“We see this as an extraordinary opportunity [for biofuel technology companies]
to ‘out-innovate’ the competition. Once you have innovation, it fuels competition
and creates efficiency and cost-effectiveness.”

Early last year, the USDA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Navy Department that envisions 50% of naval fuel needs are met by advanced biofuels. “As the military learns how to use these fuels it will have an obvious impact
on commercial aviation,” he suggested.

At the end of March, President Obama requested his Secretaries of Agriculture,
Energy and the Navy to investigate how they can work together to speed up the
development of drop-in biofuels. “Competitively-priced drop-in biofuels could
help meet the fuel needs of the Navy, as well as the commercial aviation and shipping
sectors,” he said in a speech.

Vilsack said that as a result, a number of new programmes would be revealed over the next couple of months and said the President would be making an important announcement “within the next 30 days or so”.

Richard Altman, Executive Director of the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels
Initiative (CAAFI) told GreenAir that he expected significant implications for the aviation biofuels sector to
result from the announcement.

If national security and jobs are the prime motivators for growing a biofuels industry in the United States,
meeting carbon emission reduction targets are the main concern of European policy-makers and there is a growing acceptance
within the European Commission that sustainable biofuels may provide a real opportunity
to reduce aviation’s carbon footprint in the longer term. There is also recognition
in European circles that other transport modes can move to other renewable energy
sources that are not available to commercial aircraft and so the development of
aviation biofuels must be supported as a matter of urgency.

During the Paris Air Show, the European Commission, in conjunction with Airbus
and European airlines and biofuel producers, launched a new initiative to speed
up commercialisation of aviation biofuels in Europe. The European Advanced Biofuels Flightpath is targeting the supply of two million tonnes (around 660 million US gallons or 2.5 billion litres) of sustainable
biofuels into the EU civil aviation sector by 2020
.

The initiative is the culmination of discussions since earlier this year involving
the Commission’s energy and transport directorates together with representatives
from the aviation and biofuels industry and NGOs.

The Flightpath commits members to support and promote the production, storage
and distribution of sustainably produced drop-in biofuels for use in aviation
and establish appropriate financial mechanisms to support the construction of
industrial ‘first of a kind’ advanced biofuel production plants. More specifically,
the participants will:

The Flightpath sets short-term (up to three years from now), mid-term (4-7 years)
and long-term (up to 2020) objectives, with an aim to start construction of the
first series of second-generation aviation biofuel plants within three years and
to become operational by 2015-16.  By 2018, the plan is for one million tonnes of hydrotreated sustainable oils
and 200,000 tonnes of synthetic aviation biofuels to reach the aviation market.

A second series of plants producing fuels from algae and pyrolytic oils are targeted
to be in operation by 2020, producing a further 800,000 tonnes of aviation biofuels
for use at most EU airports.

During a presentation at the Alternative Aviation Fuels Showcase, Kyriakos Maniatis
from the Commission’s energy directorate said two workshops were being set up
to take place in Brussels in the autumn to bring stakeholders together with financial
institutions and a technical workshop was planned for September to map all potential
technologies.

Maniatis said there were a number of important navigation points along the Flightpath
that would need to be addressed including ensuring sustainability criteria was in line with the EU Renewables Directive stipulation for a 60% reduction requirement in biofuel lifecycle emissions from 2020; seeking the involvement of the European Investment Bank [see below for more] in providing equity capital; and reaching agreements between aviation biofuel
buyers and suppliers on prices and contract lengths.

Commenting on the launch of the initiative, the European Commissioner for Energy,
Günter Oettinger, said: “This is a unique opportunity to create the first industrial
venture ever introducing sustainable biofuels for commercially competitive operations.
The Commission therefore fully supports all efforts in this direction and will
actively contribute to their success. They are fully in line with our European
Strategic Energy Technology Plan.”

The Commission’s SET-Plan was endorsed by the European Parliament and EU heads
of state and governments in February and will be used as the basis for the working
methods and governance of the Biofuels Flightpath.

Supporting the initiative’s aim of speeding up commercialisation, Airbus CEO
Tom Enders said: “Our catalyst role is to bring together stakeholders such as
advanced biofuel producers, airlines and lawmakers in value chains, in order to
achieve this common goal more quickly. Only by working together can we meet our
ambitious target to make air transportation truly sustainable.”

Europe’s largest airlines – Air France-KLM, Lufthansa and British Airways – are
also involved with the initiative. Air France-KLM CEO Pierre Henri Gourgeon said
the Flightpath was giving “the right signal” for the emergence of a European supply
chain.

British Airways CEO Keith Williams commented: “Biofuels represent a great opportunity
for the aviation industry to reduce its impact on climate change. This announcement
will provide the incentive needed for European airlines to accelerate their plans
to use biofuels to power their fleets. We are already embarking on plans for Europe’s
first sustainable jet fuel plant and hope that initiatives such as this will encourage
others to follow our lead.”

European aviation biofuel initiatives are indeed now coming thick and fast and
two more were announced during the Paris Air Show involving KLM and SkyNRG, and
a collaboration between the civil aviation authorities of Italy and Spain. The
latter involves Italy’s ENAC together with Spain’s AESA and SENASA in which they
will jointly work on the research and development of sustainable alternative aviation
fuels, in particular on certification and testing.

The Biofuels Flightpath is likely to lean on input from the Sustainable Way for
Alternative Fuels and Energy for Aviation (SWAFEA) study instigated by the European
Commission’s Directorate General for Transport and Energy – now separated into
DG Energy (DG ENER) and DG Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) – to investigate the
feasibility and impact of alternative aviation fuels, and evaluate potential new
energy sources. The results of the two-year study, lead by French aerospace R&D
body Onera and involving European and international industry and research partners,
were passed to the Commission following an international conference in February.

According to Doris Schröcker, Policy Officer at DG MOVE, the final report should
be published very shortly.

Links:

Paris Air Show – Alternative Aviation Fuels Showcase

United States Department of Agriculture

European Commission – European Advanced Biofuels Flightpath

SWAFEA

 

GreenAir Online will be covering other aviation biofuel and green initiatives
announced at the Paris Air Show in separate articles

http://www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=1268

 
From CEE BankWatch:
http://bankwatch.org/our-work/who-we-monitor/eib
 

European Investment Bank (EIB)

With a lending portfolio of EUR 72 billion (2010) the European Investment Bank
(EIB) is the world’s biggest public lending institution – bigger even than the
World Bank.

The EIB plays a crucial role in development finance – both within and outside
the EU. But it frequently neglects environmental and social aspects in its investments,
has a strong aversion to share information with the public and its staff is too
small to monitor projects effectively.

Bankwatch is challenging the EIB to live up to its title “EU bank” and become
a transparent and accountable institution – an institution that values real public
benefits and positive environmental and social impacts as highly as lending volume
and commercial viability.

Institutional background

As the financing institution of the European Union (EU), the EIB is an EU body
and thus bound by EU policies and legislation. It provides loans to EU countries,
about 140 partner countries and to private or public companies.

Read more

EIB in practice: Negative impacts on climate and well-being

Although the EU’s bank, the EIB is eminently failing to support EU policy goals
of tackling climate change and supporting sustainable development. Its lending
in the important energy and transport sectors and specifically its lending outside
the EU often has clearly negative, sometimes devastating impacts on the environment
and on the well-being of affected communities.

Read more

EIB policy: Neglecting environmental and social standards

The EIB does not commit itself to a binding set of operational environmental
and social policies. Time and again the EIB’s billions have thus contributed to
damaging impacts on people and their environment.

Read more

A public bank? The EIB’s lack of transparency and participation

Despite slow improvements, the EIB remains the least transparent major public
international financial institution. It takes decisions mostly solitarily without
inviting or allowing others to be involved – not even those directly affected
by its lending.

Read more

Posted: Monday, June 27th, 2011. Filed in Biofuels News.

Read more »

KLM to launch commercial flights in September Amsterdam – Paris on biofuel (? used cooking oil ?)

In practice there is nowhere near enough used cooking oil available to fuel planes,
other than as a publicity gimmick.  Most of the used oil is already used as biodiesel
for land vehicles, and other uses. There is nowhere like enough used oil to fuel
the road vehicles that would like to use it now.
 


 
 22.6.2011 (Reuters)
 
KLM press release:

AMSTELVEEN,
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines has taken another important step in aviation sustainability.
In September KLM will launch more than 200 flights being operated on biokerosene
between Amsterdam and Paris.
[Nothing to say what % of the fuel will be the used oil] .
 “KLM has once again shown it is stimulating the development of biokerosene”,
according to managing director Camiel Eurlings. “In November 2009 we demonstrated
that it was technically possible to fly on biokerosene. Now, a year and a half
after our first demonstration flight on Camelina, a new phase has been entered
around the world, that of certification. Authorisation will soon be granted to
operate commercial flights on biofuel. I am especially proud to announce that
KLM will take this substantial step in September”.

The flights will be operated on biofuel made from Used Cooking Oil.  KLM is open
to using different raw materials for the end product, as long as they meet a range
of sustainability criteria, including substantial reductions in CO2 emissions
and minimum negative impact on biodiversity and food supply. All biofuels used
by KLM also have to meet precisely the same technical specifications as traditional
kerosene and must not require any adjustments to aircraft engines or infrastructure. 

The fuel is produced by Dynamic Fuels and supplied by SkyNRG, the consortium
launched by KLM and North Sea Group and Spring Associates in 2009. SkyNRG is actively
developing a sustainable production chain for aviation biofuels. The sustainability
of alternative kerosene depends on many factors and is assessed on a case-by-case
basis. In order to be able in future to reach the right decisions in this area,
SkyNRG is advised by an independent Sustainability Board, consisting of the Dutch
wing of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Solidaridad, and the Copernicus
Institute of the University of Utrecht. A positive recommendation from the Sustainability
Board carries a lot of weight for KLM.

KLM also supports the view published in the WWF’s Energy Report which indicates
that alternative fuels made from biomass are the only appropriate replacement
for fossil fuels for such sectors as the airline industry. Eurlings: “The route
to 100% sustainable energy is enormously challenging. The costs of biofuels need
to come down substantially and permanently. This can be achieved through innovation,
collaboration and the right legislation that stimulates biofuel in the airline
industry, but with an eye on honest competition. We really need to move forward
together to attain continuous access to sustainable fuel”.

KLM has been committed to developing sustainable biofuel since 2007. Air France KLM is also an industry leader in the field of fuel efficiency. Air France KLM
has been sector leader of de Dow Jones Sustainability Index for six successive
years.

For more information:

KLM Media Relations, tel. + (31) 020 – 649 45 45 

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/06/22/idUS40909+22-Jun-2011+HUG20110622

 
 
see also
BBC   23.6.2011
KLM plans to fly planes on reused cooking oil
  
 
 
Wikipedia:
As of 2000, the United States was producing in excess of 11 billion liters (2.9 billion U.S. gallons) of waste
vegetable oil annually, mainly from industrial
deep fryers in potato processing plants, snack food factories and fast food restaurants. If all those 11 billion liters could be collected and used to replace the energy
equivalent amount of petroleum (an ideal case), almost 1% of US oil consumption
could be offset.[10] Use of waste vegetable oil as a fuel competes with some
other uses of the commodity, which has effects on its price as a fuel and increases its
cost as an input to the other uses as well.

Currently, the largest uses of waste vegetable oil in the U.S. are for animal feed, pet food, and cosmetics. Since 2002, an increasing number of European Union countries have prohibited the inclusion of waste vegetable oil from catering in animal feed. Waste cooking oils from food manufacturing, however, as well
as fresh or unused cooking oil, continues to be used in animal feed.[18]

More recently, waste oil has become known for its ability to be refined into
biodiesel fuel.
  
  
and
The Ecologist, November 2009
According to research by the BBC, the catering industry in the UK produces about
50-90 million litres of waste cooking oil each year, while Ireland discards more
than 10,000 tonnes of waste vegetable oil annually.
  
  
and
BBC 
July 2008
There’s simply not enough cooking oil in the UK to take over from diesel entirely
according to the government’s
Better Regulation Commission. Current waste oil supplies could only feasibly power around one-350th of the
UK’s cars. In fact, the Energy Systems Research Unit estimates that the UK can
only produce enough
biodiesel from waste veggie oil to displace less than 0.6% of conventional diesel.
 
 
 
 
The idea of running the world’s cars on waste cooking oil is also mainly fantasy.
There’s very little used cooking oil to spare, because globally it’s already being
recycled into things like soap and animal feeds.



Rather more important, used cooking oil is a drop in the ocean when it comes
to supplying the West’s transport needs. According to a  report from New York’s
Cornell University:





“[Used cooking oil] has an available potential to produce almost 1.7  billion
gallons of [biodiesel] [which is] 1.1% of [America’s]  petroleum imports today.”






(A litre of cooking oil does not give out a litre of biodiesel. Much of the cooking
oil used to cook french fries is eaten as part of the fries and much of the waste
cooking oil left over is unusable solids.)



Because of the shortage of used cooking oils for conversion to biodiesel, there
is a global race to produce vegetable oils to meet the demand. This demand has
driven up food prices, making it much harder for poor people to feed their families. 
Also, forests are being cleared to grow crops like palm oil for biodiesel, meaning
that some biofuels are actually contributing to global warming by removing forests
that would have absorbed C02.



www.guardian.co.uk/climatechange/story/0,,1659037,00.html



Posted: Thursday, June 23rd, 2011. Filed in Biofuels News.

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Friends of the Earth Europe report on aviation biofuels – Flying in the Face of the Facts

Friends of the Earth Europe report about biofuels for aviation


20.6.2011   
 


 

FRIENDS OF THE EARTH EUROPE – Press release

 
FLYING IN THE FACE OF THE FACTS      Report

Aviation industry expected to launch biofuel targets as major international institutions
recommend scrapping biofuel subsidies

Brussels/Paris,    European airlines fuelling aeroplanes with biofuels is greenwashing,
and flies in the face of recommendations from major international institutions,
Friends of the Earth Europe said today on the opening day of the Paris air show,
Le Bourget.

The European aviation industry, with support from the European Commission, is
expected to announce plans to use 2 million tonnes of bio-kerosene per year by
2020. [1]   This could require up to 3.5 million hectares, an area the size of
Belgium, to grow, with serious environmental implications. KLM and Virgin Atlantic
have already carried out test flights with various blends of biofuel, and Lufthansa
launches its first commercial flight this year. [2]

According to new analysis from Friends of the Earth Europe biofuels present the
aviation industry with a convenient blind alley, facilitating the industry’s expansion
plans, avoiding pressure to reduce fuel use and diverting political attention
from the real need to cut air travel in order to reduce climate change. [3]

Robbie Blake, biofuels campaigner for Friends of the Earth Europe said:  “The
European aviation industry is simply flying in the face of the facts.  Biofuels
exacerbate poverty and hunger, drive land-grabbing and

deforestation, push up food prices, and threaten to make climate change worse,
not better. These new biofuel targets offer a convenient smokescreen for aviation
industry expansion, but not the genuine emission reductions needed.”

This week, G20 Agriculture Ministers will be discussing measures to reduce pressure
on rising food costs, including recommendations by the World Bank, WTO, UN, OECD
and others to scrap biofuel subsidies and

mandates because of their impact on world poverty and food prices. [4]

Europe’s biofuel plans are causing social and environmental destruction.[5]  
Controversial crops to be included in the aviation biofuel mix include palm oil
– the production of which is linked with tropical deforestation, irreparable biodiversity
loss, and human rights abuses – and jatropha, promoted as a miracle crop, but
in reality instrumental in driving land-grabs in India and Africa. [6]

***

NOTES:

[1] The European Commission and Airbus together with the European Aviation Industry
and European Biofuels producers are expected to launch the “European Advanced
Biofuels Flightpath”.  Originally planned for the

Paris Air show in Le Bourget at the Airbus Press Chalet on 22nd June at 14.30,
this has subsequently been postponed until further notice.

[2] The German Government is contributing €5 million to the “FAIR” initiative
(Future Aircraft Research) which is looking at biofuels, other alternative fuels
and aircraft concepts.  Of this €2.5 million will go to Lufthansa’s “burnFAIR”
project in which it plans to trial biofuel for six months in one engine of an
aircraft flying the short Hamburg to Frankfurt route.

[3] “Flying in the face of facts: Greenwashing the aviation industry with biofuels”, Friends of the Earth Europe’s analysis on the impact of aviation biofuels is
released today and is available for download here:

http://www.foeeurope.org/publications/2011/FoEE_Flying_in_the_face_of_facts_June2011.pdf   (14 pages)

[4] The FAO, IFAD, IMF, OECD, UNCTAD, WFP, the World Bank and the WTO’s policy
paper “Price Volatility in Food and Agricultural Markets: Policy Responses”, published
in May 2011, contains the following “Recommendation 6: G20 governments remove
provisions of current national policies that subsidize (or mandate) biofuels production
or consumption”. The paper is available for download here
http://ictsd.org/downloads/2011/05/finalg20report.pdf

As reported in the Financial Times 9 June 2011 “Report urges end to G20 biofuel
subsidies” http://on.ft.com/mg0XKv

[5] http://www.foeeurope.org/press/2010/Nov08_Europe%27s_biofuels_plans_driving_social_environmental_destruction.html

[6] http://www.foeeurope.org/agrofuels/FoEE_Africa_up_for_grabs_2010.pdf 

http://www.foeeurope.org/press/2011/Jun20_BRIEFING_flying_in_the_face_of_facts.html

 

 

 

Posted: Tuesday, June 21st, 2011. Filed in Biofuels News.

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