Gatwick rushes to offer money – if it gets a 2nd runway – to support and incentivise new domestic air services

After Heathrow got itself some good publicity in its runway campaign, by saying it would spend £10 million to set up some new regional routes, Gatwick has been panicked into doing the same. It appears to have had to rush out a paper, stating it will spend £20 million over 10 years to strengthen domestic air services.  Only if it gets a second runway. The paper setting out its plan contains little text, and gives no references or sources for the figures it uses.  Gatwick says it already serves 11 destinations within the UK compared with 7 at Heathrow.  Gatwick says its plans for a 2nd runway will “encourage the growth of regional airports and the development of international services outside London and the South East” though it does not explain how.  It probably means that if there are more long haul flights from an expanded Heathrow, there would be less market demand for these flights from regional airports, and they would thus suffer (which is true).  Following what Heathrow has already offered, Gatwick says it will consult on reducing landing charges for regional flights.  If Gatwick wasn’t so busy lobbying around Heathrow, and with negative campaigning about Heathrow, it might have thought of some of these ideas for itself, rather than just being a pastiche of Heathrow.

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Gatwick to launch £20 million fund to support and incentivise new domestic and regional air services

10/04/2015

  • £20 million fund among a raft of measures to strengthen domestic air services
  • Gatwick already provides better connectivity to the regions and nations
  • Expansion at Gatwick supports the growth of domestic services and airports

Gatwick Airport will establish a £20 million fund to support new air services to Gatwick from around the UK in the ten years following the opening of a second runway.

Gatwick already serves 11 destinations within the UK compared with seven at Heathrow. This initiative is designed to ensure that the benefits of a second runway also extends to further improving connectivity between the regions and nations and London. Gatwick’s plans for a second runway will also encourage the growth of regional airports and the development of international services outside London and the South East.

Gatwick’s plans aims to strengthen the whole of the UK’s network of airports whereas Heathrow’s plans aim to concentrate international traffic through Heathrow itself, restricting the growth of airports outside the capital.

The fund can be used to incentivise airlines to introduce new services. The fund can also be used to provide jointly-agreed marketing support to regional development or other tourism bodies in regional England or Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland for new services. Along with the fund, Gatwick will also:

  • Propose and consult on changes to charges to support the growth of national and regional air services and encourage easier connection between airlines
  • Support funding applications for new Public Sector Obligation services, and
  • Work with Government to explore how to safeguard slots for new national and regional services.

Launching the fund at a presentation to Prospective Parliamentary Candidates at the Cornwall Chamber of Commerce today, Stewart Wingate, Gatwick CEO, said:

“Gatwick has always been serious about encouraging the growth and development of a strong network of competing airports around the UK. This fund – and the measures we propose to support it – will improve connectivity to London for those that need it. 

“Gatwick expansion is best for the UK and regions because it supports not only the growth of connectivity to London, but also more connectivity between all UK airports and international short and long haul destinations. 

“Expanding Gatwick will provide more competition and choice for passengers all around the UK.

An independent report issued recently by the OECD found that the increased prices an expanded Heathrow would charge, would discourage more flights to other UK airports. The report also said a bigger Heathrow would also ‘diminish’ the chance of new long haul services flying directly out of other UK airports.

Gatwick is not only already better connected to the regions than Heathrow, it is also far cheaper for airlines and passengers. Heathrow already has the highest airport charges in the world – in addition to landing and parking charges, Heathrow charges £29.59 per domestic departing passenger compared to Gatwick’s charge of £10.52 per domestic departing passenger.  [Heathrow will cut its charge for domestic passengers to £19.59  from 1.1.2016.  See details ]

 

Ends

 

For more information on why Gatwick is best for regional growth and connectivity, see its regional proposal in full here.

 

Gatwick claims  its expansion:  

  • is affordable, sustainable and deliverable (unlike Heathrow’s proposal)
  • will help deliver lower fares through lower airport charges and greater competition
  • offers a more convenient choice of London airports for passengers, and
  • will help sustain and encourage more services direct from other national and regional airports

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/press-releases/2015/2015-04-10-regional-fund.aspx

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See also:

Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

Saad Hammad, the chief executive of Flybe, has criticised Gatwick for failing to address the needs of Britain’s regions, in its attempt to win support for its second runway. The head of the UK’s biggest regional airline said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights and “I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like…. Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.” Heathrow has said it would look at cutting charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made. These cuts are largely to deter passengers flying via Schiphol or other European hubs, rather than concern for the regional airports. Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and only one from Gatwick to Newquay. It sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013. A spokesman for Gatwick said that it had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even if Heathrow reduced their domestic fees. Gatwick said it is planning to give details of its proposals on fees further later this month. It has claimed its landing charges would not rise above £15 per passenger, but only it gets a 2nd runway and Government agrees a contract not to allow any other runway in the south east for 30 years ….

Click here to view full story…

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to reduce number flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59.  They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral.  The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead.  The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges.  Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes,including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

and

Heathrow would spend £10 million to increase some domestic flights, only if granted a 3rd runway, to get backing from regions

Heathrow has increasingly cut the number of flights to UK regional airports, as it has become more uneconomic for the airlines to run them – and long haul international routes are more profitable. But Heathrow is aware that it needs to get the backing of regional airports, in order to lobby to be allowed a 3rd runway. Heathrow therefore suggested the setting up of a National Connectivity Task Force. In order to boost flights to the regions, Heathrow now says that – only IF it gets a new runway – it will spend £10 million on for the development of 5 new domestic routes, for 3 years. These would include Newquay, Humberside and Liverpool. That would be in addition to the 4 extra routes that easyJet has said it wants to operate if there is a Heathrow runway, to Inverness, Belfast International, the Isle of Man and Jersey. There are currently 6 domestic routes from Heathrow (Leeds Bradford, Belfast City, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Newcastle). Heathrow also said it would launch a review of its airport charges in the coming weeks to focus on making domestic flights more commercially attractive (cheaper) to airlines. The results of this consultation, which is not dependent upon getting a new runway, will be effective from January 2016.

Click here to view full story…

Liverpool airport says ‘we will talk to anyone’ as Gatwick announces £20 million fund and Heathrow announces £10 million…

Liverpool John Lennon Airport says it would be happy to speak to Gatwick Airport about regional routes, after Gatwick put out a press release to say (copying Heathrow’s earlier offer) it would spend up to £20 million to help support regional air routes. Gatwick and Heathrow offers only apply if that airport got a new runway, not otherwise. Liverpool Airport has already been in talks with Heathrow about the possibility of getting a link there (if there is a new runway) – as Heathrow is keen not to lose connecting flights, if people in the regions prefer to fly via Schiphol. However, Gatwick’s offer would have far less appeal than Heathrow’s to Liverpool Airport because it does not offer a connection to a hub, for long haul flights. A spokesman for Liverpool airport said: “We are always open to suggestions for new routes and we are happy to speak to anyone.” Heathrow says it is offering a £10 million fund to support regional routes, to five airports over 3 years. Those named are Liverpool, Newquay and Humberside. On 31st March Liverpool announced that Flybe would operate a service up to 3-times-a-day to Schiphol starting on September 7th. ie. They would not then need links to Gatwick or to Heathrow.

Click here to view full story…


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In Gatwick’s little report (not a lot of content, lots of pretty pictures …) it states:

“It is estimated that airport charges alone at an expanded Heathrow will rise to over £80 for a return trip compared to £30 at Gatwick after expansion.”  [This is very different to the assessment by the Commission, of up about  maximum of £58 for Heathrow and £46 for Gatwick]. See below
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But the Airports Commission said – about the Gatwick runway:“3.41Investment of this scale would entail increases in the airport’s charges to airlines. Gatwick Airport Ltd has estimated, for example, that per passenger charges would rise from £9 currently to £12-15 as a result of expansion. This is lower than the charges predicted by the Commission’s analysis, which indicate average charges rising to between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23.”Gatwick Airport second runway: business case and sustainability assessment
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/373211/evidence-base-gatwick-airport-second-runway.pdf
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and

On the Heathrow north-west runway, the Commission said:

“The resulting impact to passenger aeronautical charges across the Commission’s four demand scenarios for Heathrow is an increase from c. £20 per passenger to an average of c. £27-29 per passenger”…

Heathrow Airport Extended Northern Runway: Business Case and Sustainability Assessment
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/374663/evidence-base-heathrow-airport-extended-northern-runway.pdf

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Read more »

Forests and lakes destroyed to build Istanbul’s vast 3rd airport aerotropolis covering 76 square kilometers of land

Istanbul is building a third airport, north of the city close to the Terkos lake area.  Istanbul already has Atatürk Airport on the European side and Sabiha Gökçen airport on the Asian side (these handle around 45 million and 15 million passengers respectively per year), but both claim to be struggling with increased demand – being well located as a hub between Europe, the Middle East and the East.  Their national airline, Turkish Airlines, is growing fast. The site for the 3rd airport, which is to be an Aerotropolis, not merely an airport, is about 76 square kilometres. The third airport is linked with other forest destroying megaprojects – a third bridge over the Bosphorus, a motorway and a canal linking the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara. All three are linked and feed into each other.  The vast construction works destroy areas of forest, lakes and ponds – causing serious local concern about biodiversity loss, loss of natural habitat and possible future heat island and water supply problems.  Turkey wants another vast airport, perhaps able to take up to 150 million passengers per year, partly to boost its chances of getting the Olympics in 2024. The busiest airport in the world now, Atlanta, handles about 95 million passengers per year.  A short video shows the ongoing environmental destruction, during the building of the airport. https://vimeo.com/123657571
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Forests and lakes destroyed for Istanbul’s 3rd airport

 

Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ (the ‘North Forest Defence’) which campaigns to protect the forests to the north of Istanbul, has made an English language version of a shocking video. (Vimeo  3 mins 20 secs)

It documents the destruction of forests for the city’s third airport. Its ecocide: piles of felled trees; a long line of earth moving trucks nose to tail along the highway; bulldozers gouging away at the earth; forests, lakes and meadows destroyed. A sheep farmer explains that there is nowhere for him to tend his animals once the construction site is fenced off and fears dreadful consequences of the loss of the forest, it attracts rainfall that the city depends upon.

The forest protectors want the world to know what is happening here. People sharing this video in English on social media are urged to use the hashtag #‎ResistAgainstInstanbul3rdAirport‬

The third airport is linked with other forest destroying megaprojects – a third bridge over the Bosphorus, a motorway and a canal linking the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara.

On 26th March Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ held a press conference during which architect Mücella Yapıcı warned of irreversible ecological damage from the airport and other megaprojects, and announced that several business chambers, including the Chamber of Architects and the Chamber of Engineers, have united to open a court case relating to two Environmental Impact Reports. Both reports, prepared for investors, emphasised serious ecological destruction, with Yapıcı stating ‘This is the massacre of Istanbul. We cannot just sit here silently and allow this’.

At the press conference, Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ presented its latest report. Entitled Life, Nature, Environment, Humanity and the Law against the Third Airport Project (article in Turkish – but a Google translation gives a workable understanding of what it is saying !)  it explains that the megaprojects – the bridge, highway, canal and airport – are interconnected and designed to feed each others’ growth.

The report also reveals that the new airport is not just an airport; it is a plan for an aerotropolis (a city built around an airport), on a site of over 76 square kilometres.

Even if the new airport reaches its stated goal of 150 million passengers per year (which would make it the world’s busiest airport), the land area far exceeds that which would be required for aeronautical operations. Currently, Atlanta Airport in the US is the world’s busiest passenger airport, handling 95 million passengers per year, covering a site of 16.25 square kilometres.

The aerotropolis plan is designed to trigger development on land surrounding it including business, cultural and sports complexes, sprawling over the last remaining pristine natural areas of the area.

Negative environmental impacts from felling of forests include loss of climate regulation through oxygen production and carbon sequestration. There are serious concerns over the concreting over of lakes which is a threat to Istanbul’s water supply and the loss of habitat hosting an abundance of wildlife such as wolves, insects and at least 160 species of birds.

http://antiaero.org/2015/04/01/forests-and-lakes-destroyed-for-istanbuls-3rd-airport-2/

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Some extracts (very imperfect translation into English – apologies…. ) from the Turkish article at  http://www.radikal.com.tr/cevre/istanbul_aerotropolis_oluyor-1321969

Airport not Aerotropolis

26.3.2015
North Forest Defense resistance … has prepared a report on the planned 3rd airport.
…..According to the report, the airport project is actually a city complex. Therefore, Istanbul, aero (air) and Tropolis (metropolis-metropolitan) consisting of words and the way to becoming a new concept Aerotropolis.
…. It Is not only the airport under the project, the EIA report ‘Airport City Complex’ under the title, business center, the congress and cultural centers and sports complexes are mentioned ….
… Istanbul ‘s north airport is an attraction for the construction industry …. and  ‘is designed to trigger a variety of development projects around creating project. This project, a management wheel of the economy tied to the construction industry, the last remaining pristine areas of Istanbul opening to plunder ………….”
….
The report noted the following:
* the 3rd airport project is a package of 3 things, with an Istanbul bridge and Canal  project. Each of these projects is planned to feed the other.. The 3rd airport’s positioning in this region and the North Marmara Motorway brought into the center of attraction of the route passing through the channel.
….. 90% of the wetlands and forests and this particular area will be covered by airport concrete building.
….  90% percent of lakes and forests of this special region will be covered in concrete and contribute to an urban heat island.
…. The World is entering era of thirst, and Istanbul will lose its water resources.
… The benefits of forests (wood production, water production, climate regulation, carbon sequestration and oxygen production, reduce air pollution, habitat of living and so on) would decrease.
….. This is not a land where other natural habitat is being developed. There is much biodiversity in the forest and the lakes and ponds that are being destroyed.
….. This project will increase the drought and water shortage in the opposite direction to one side to take measures against drought and thirst, and are projects that will accelerate.
…. the authorities say there are 17 species of birds in the region, but other ornithologists say there are 160 species or even 200 bird species.
…. there are issues about the direction the planes will land, into the wind.
….. Due to increasing foreign debt interest and exchange rates, €22 billion to €152 million have been ??? received by the consortium for the 3rd airport. The cost of the airport’s only the first nine months increased by $12.9 billion.
….. the new Aerotropolis planned will be a new city, to rival Istanbul, not merely an airport.
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Construction of Istanbul’s third airport continues at full throttle despite concerns

ISTANBUL – Anadolu Agency

The new airport is expected to host 150 million passengers each year. AA Photo

The new airport is expected to host 150 million passengers each year. AA Photo

Construction of Istanbul’s third airport continues at full throttle despite concerns

9.11.2014  (Turkish Daily News)

Construction of Istanbul’s third airport is continuing, in a bid to establish in Turkey’s largest city what the government hopes will be the most important center of world air traffic.

The Cengiz-Kolin-Limak-Mapa-Kalyon Consortium, a joint venture of Turkish companies, is continuing ground works with the grant holder of the site Istanbul Grand Airport (IGA). Company officials say the operations are ongoing on 76.5 square kilometers of land.

The controversial facility, promoted by the government to showcase development, will become not only Istanbul’s largest airport but also one of the world’s major hubs. Its construction in one of the city’s most precious natural areas, however, has drawn criticism from activists denouncing a culture of plunder and destruction.

There are currently two different lawsuits opened by the Chamber of Environmental Engineers against the contracting of the airport construction, but there has been no development in the cases in the last two years. The Northern Forest Defense, an environmental group that has long been advocating against the third airport and bridge, has launched an online campaign under the hashtag “Resist the third airport.”

With local and foreign experts overseeing the work, a total of 780 geological surveys have been conducted since the beginning of works in March 2014, along with 1,020 soil sample tests and 9,000 Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPT), according to the project’s geotechnical reports.

The Turkish Aviation Organization and Administration, which is under the authority of the General Directorate of State Airports, is following the coordination and management of the project’s progress. The airport is planned to be opened in 2017.

November/09/2014

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/construction-of-istanbuls-third-airport-continues-at-full-throttle-despite-concerns.aspx?pageID=238&nID=74079&NewsCatID=340


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See earlier:

Turkey plans to build a 6-runway mega airport near Istanbul to be one of the world’s largest

Turkey is planning to build one of the world’s biggest airports, and one larger than anything in Europe, costing some $5bn.  It wants to make Istanbul a global hub and boost its chances of getting the Olympics in 2020. Turkey is well situated geographically for traffic between the USA and Europe, and the Far East. It is therefore in competition with other Middle East and Gulf countries, which are also building mega-sized airports, such as Dubai and Doha (capital of Qatar). A tender will be held in may for the Turkish airport.  This would be the third airport for Istanbul, which already has Ataturk airport, and Sabiha airport – which handle around 45 million and 15 million passengers respectively per year. The new airport will be near the Black Sea, and is anticipated to be able to cope with 150 million passengers per year. By contrast, Heathrow deals with some 69 million, and Atlanta – the world’s busiest airport – handles some 90 million per year. The plans are for the new 6 runway airport to be open by 2017.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2013/01/manchester-ditch-c-charge-sell-airport/

 


 

 

31.10.2012

Third Istanbul airport to be formed in northwest

ISTANBUL – Doğan News Agency

Istanbul’s third airport will likely be built in the Terkos Lake area, Mayor Kadir Topbaş has said.

“Following the advice of our prime minister, we are starting the construction of a new Istanbul airport with five or six runways and a passenger capacity of 100 million in the short term, which will be increased to 150 million,” Topbaş said, adding that Atatürk Airport’s current capacity was 34 million passengers.

Topbaş said the Terkos Lake area, 50 kilometers north of Istanbul on the Black Sea coast, was a very strong possibility for the airport’s location.

Topbaş said Atatürk Airport was insufficient to handle the city’s air traffic, particularly in regards to strong southwestern winds.

A third airport in Istanbul, the largest city in the country, has long been on the agenda as Atatürk Airport on the European side and Sabiha Gökçen airport on the Asian side are struggling to meet the city’s rising demands, particularly as national flag carrier Turkish Airlines boosts its flights and the city attracts more visitors.Topbaş said the airport would be built on a deserted site to preserve the area’s natural, forested environment, adding that a proposal for the project would likely be initiated by the end of the year.

Topbaş also said the construction of a third bridge to span the Bosphorus in Istanbul would be completed by 2015 or 2016.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/third-istanbul-airport-to-be-formed-in-northwest.aspx?pageID=238&nID=33620&NewsCatID=341

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/third-istanbul-airport-to-be-formed-in-northwest.aspx?pageID=238&nID=33620&NewsCatID=341 
The recent announcement of a series of huge infrastructural projects to be parachuted onto the northern area of Istanbul – a third airport, a new city for millions on the coast of the Black Sea, a new canal to mitigate the pressure on The Bosporus, and a new highway connecting all these projects to Europe and Asia, which will cross the Bosporus over a new, third bridge – raises questions about the soundness of the city’s sustainability policy. Unless ecological interests will be integrated into the new plans, natural resources, especially sweet water supplies, will come under serious threat.
http://iabr.nl/en/nieuws/istanbul-op-tweesprong

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£2.8m project led by Stirling University on tackling airport congestion and best use of capacity

Stirling University has announced it is leading a major 6 year, £2.8 million, project that focuses on tackling UK airport congestion.  The project will examine the better use of existing capacity and resources – rather than sole reliance on new airport building and expansion – resulting in benefits to both the industry and travellers. The team of Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers, led by Professor Edmund Burke will be looking at the best ways to allocate runway capacity. The programme is called the OR-MASTER (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources). They will work on the EPSRC-funded (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) research with colleagues from Lancaster University Management School. The study will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is as efficient and effective as possible. The aim to produce a better solution not just for the UK, but for internationally, in finding the most efficient ways to schedule flights, developing and testing new models and solution algorithms for the allocation of flight ‘slots.’  It aims to get a better understanding of the trade-off  between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule  delays.

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£2.8m project by Stirling expert on tackling airport congestion

19 March 2015  (Stirling University)
A major £2.8 million project led by Stirling and Lancaster University teams, which will focus on tackling UK airport congestion, is announced today.

 

The project will examine the better use of existing capacity and resources – rather than sole reliance on new airport building and expansion – resulting in benefits to both the industry and travellers.

Professor Edmund Burke, Senior Deputy Principal and Deputy Vice-Chancellor, will lead a team of Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers at the University of Stirling in the OR-MASTER Programme Grant (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources).

They will work on the EPSRC-funded (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) research with colleagues from Lancaster University Management School.

The six-year study comes amid growing concerns over airport capacity, rising demand, and the impact of congestion on both the travelling public and the air transport industry.

Professor Burke said: “It is recognised that as economies grow and as the need for air travel grows, greater capacity at airports is required. We are delighted to receive this grant, which will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is being realised as efficiently and effectively as possible.

“By incorporating the needs of a wide variety of stakeholders, including air space operators, airports, airlines and travellers, we aim to produce a better solution not just for the UK, but for the wider international community.”

The work will build on the UK’s world-leading expertise in Operational Research to find the most efficient ways to schedule flights, developing and testing new models and solution algorithms that take into account all the factors involved in the allocation of flight ‘slots’: individual airport operations, networks of airports, airline operations, air traffic management systems, airport authorities, civil aviation authorities, airlines and the travelling public.

Project lead, Professor Konstantinos G. Zografos at Lancaster University Management School, said: “Existing approaches to airport slot allocation do not consider all the real-world complexity involved. Therefore, there is room to improve airport capacity utilization which will benefit airlines, airports and the travelling public.

“It will support policy makers and air transport decision makers here and overseas in getting to grips with airport congestion and in optimally allocating scarce airport resources. The air transport industry generally will benefit from acquiring a better understanding of the trade-off  between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule  delays.”

EPSRC Chief Executive Professor Philip Nelson said: “Put simply, world-class projects like this help to make the UK the best place in the world to research, discover and innovate. This investment will fuel the UK’s technological progress, help address the challenges of today and tomorrow, and contribute to a strong economy.”

Professor Gerry McCormac, University of Stirling Principal and Vice-Chancellor, said: “Professor Edmund Burke’s research is globally renowned. This multimillion pound award, which he and colleagues from Lancaster University have received from the EPSRC, will address congestion at airports around the world.

“At Stirling we are known for world-class research that tackles real life problems. Our excellence in research was demonstrated in the recent UK wide Research Excellence Framework, which positioned us as the 5th most research-intensive university in Scotland and 40th in the UK. Almost three quarters of our research activity was rated as either internationally excellent or world-leading.”

OR-MASTER will involve close collaboration between the two Universities and a host of international organisations, who will provide real-world data, insights and expertise. The project represents a strong partnership between academia, the air transport industry and policy makers.

The project will create opportunities for 12 new researchers – six at each institution – to gain experience with international research centres and air transport industry organisations.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/news/2015/03/airport-capacity-study/


 

 

Experts address UK airport congestion

19 March 2015

By Katie Sadler ( International Airport Review)

Experts have today revealed a programme to address UK airport congestion and capacity without a reliance on new airport building and expansion.

The OR-MASTER Programme Grant (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources) has been established in response to growing concerns over airport capacity, rising demand, and the impact of congestion on both the travelling public and the air transport industry. The £2.8 million project will be managed by a team at Lancaster University Management School, working with Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers at the University of Stirling. The research has been funded by the EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council).

Work carried out will address efficient ways to schedule flights and develop and test new models and solution algorithms that take into account all the factors involved in the allocation of flight ‘slots’: individual airport operations, networks of airports, airline operations, air traffic management systems, airport authorities, civil aviation authorities, airlines and the travelling public.

Project lead, Professor Konstantinos G. Zografos at Lancaster University Management School, said: “Existing approaches to airport slot allocation do not consider all the real-world complexity involved. Therefore, there is room to improve airport capacity utilization which will benefit airlines, airports and the travelling public.

“It will support policy makers and air transport decision makers here and overseas in getting to grips with airport congestion and in optimally allocating scarce airport resources. The air transport industry generally will benefit from acquiring a better understanding of the trade-off between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule delays.

Professor Kevin Glazebrook from Lancaster University Management School also commented: “There is an international research effort to find solutions to a problem that’s high on the agenda for air transport decision and policy makers globally. With its reputation in Operational Research, the UK should be leading the way in meeting this challenge, and the new funding will help us do that.”

The project at the University of Stirling will be led by Professor Edmund Burke, current Senior Deputy Principal and Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Professor Burke said: “It is recognised that as economies grow and as the need for air travel grows, greater capacity at airports is required. We are delighted to receive this grant, which will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is being realised as efficiently and effectively as possible.”

The OR-MASTER project will take place over a six year period collaborating with a host of organisations internationally that will provide both insight and expertise. Organisations involved include the National Air Traffic Services (NATS); Eurocontrol (managing air traffic across Europe); Park Air Systems; KLM Air France; Zurich Airport and Athens International Airport; the research organisations linked to the national air navigation services for Italy and Spain (SICTA and CRIDA); SESAR (Single European Sky research body); the Airport Services Association; Goldair Handling; ACI Europe (Airports Council International); the HALA! SESAR network of leading researchers in Europe working in the area of Air Traffic Management automation; NEXTOR II (National Centre of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research); the MIT International Centre for Air Transport Research (MIT-ICAT) in the USA; and DLR, the German Airspace Research Centre.

EPSRC Chief Executive Professor Philip Nelson commented on the upcoming programme: “Put simply, world-class projects like this help to make the UK the best place in the world to research, discover and innovate. This investment will fuel the UK’s technological progress, help address the challenges of today and tomorrow, and contribute to a strong economy.”

http://www.internationalairportreview.com/19129/airport-news/experts-address-uk-airport-congestion/

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Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

Saad Hammad, the chief executive of Flybe, has criticised Gatwick for failing to address the needs of Britain’s regions, in its attempt to win support for its second runway. The head of  the UK’s biggest regional airline said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights and “I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like…. Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.”  Heathrow has said it would look at cutting charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made. These cuts are largely to deter passengers flying via Schiphol or other European hubs, rather than concern for the regional airports. Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and only one from Gatwick to Newquay. It sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013. A spokesman for Gatwick said that it had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even if Heathrow reduced their domestic fees. Gatwick said it is planning to give details of its proposals on fees further later this month. It has claimed its landing charges would not rise above £15 per passenger, but only it gets a 2nd runway and Government agrees a contract not to allow any other runway in the south east for 30 years ….
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Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

By Phil Davies (Travel Weekly)
8.4.2015

Gatwick has been accused by the boss of Flybe of failing to address the needs of UK regions in its fight with rival Heathrow to win support for expansion.

The regional carrier’s chief executive, Saad Hammad, said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights.

“I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like,” he told the Financial Times. “Right now, Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.”

Heathrow has pledged to cut charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made.

Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and just one from Gatwick to Newquay, having sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013.

A Gatwick spokesman said that the airport had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even domestic fees were reduced.

It is planning to set out its own proposals on how to improve fees further later this month.

“UK plc needs a network of long-haul airports that provide direct services around the world, rather than forcing all flights through a single-hub airport in the capital,” the Gatwick spokesman said.

http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/Articles/2015/04/08/53749/flybe+accuses+gatwick+of+ignoring+uk+regions.html

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 See earlier: 

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to deter passengers flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59. They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral. The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead. The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges. Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

Gatwick “promises” to cap landing charges to £15 + inflation for 30 years (if it gets an unspecified 30 year “contract” from Government)

Gatwick airport, in frenetic publicity in the months before the Airports Commission runway recommendation (expected late June) has made various pledges – in the hope of currying favour. It says it will “bear all the main risks” of a new runway. Sir Roy McNulty, chairman of Gatwick, has written to Sir Howard Davies saying – among other things – that the landing charge will be kept at £15 (plus inflation) for 30 years. As long as there is no new Heathrow runway. (It is currently £9). Sir Roy said it is “in return for Government agreeing a 30 year contract” though exactly what that means is not explained. Presumably a contract that there will be no other runway? Gatwick also says it will “bear all the main risks of the expansion programme . . . including long-term risks related to traffic levels, market pricing, construction and operating costs”. How exactly? Gatwick’s main airline, EasyJet, is not happy with charges rising to £15. The Airports Commission consultation documents considered Gatwick’s estimate of £15 to be too low, and instead considered “average charges rising to between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23.” These higher levels were due to lower estimated levels of air passenger demand than Gatwick’s optimistic figures, and higher infrastructure costs. [ Airports Commission’s consultation document Page 47].

Click here to view full story…

 

The “30 year contract”

Asked what this contact says, or whether it exists, below is what Gatwick senior management have said:

“The exact nature of the thirty year contract has yet to be finalised – its purpose would be to clarify the commercial and regulatory environment in which we would be operating, including the anticipated timing of any new runways beyond that granted to Gatwick. Whilst we understand that one government cannot bind a future government irreversibly, if there was a legal contract in place and the future proved different from that which had been committed to, the contract could also govern what might happen in those circumstances.”

Make of that what you can !

GACC says Gatwick’s rash promise to cap landing charge at £15 puts its runway plan in doubt

Gatwick airport have made a very rash promise not to raise their landing charges above £15 (plus inflation) for 30 years, if they get a 30 contract from the government (details not specified). Brendon Sewill, of GACC said: “The whole runway project is in doubt…. Gatwick’s rash promise not to raise airport charges above £15 per head …. seriously puts in question whether building a new runway at Gatwick is a viable business proposal – either for the present owners or for the new owners if Gatwick is sold.” The Airports Commission calculate that Gatwick charges would need to rise to ‘between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23. GACC points out that Gatwick’s promises are meaningless unless they are put into a legal agreement binding on the present airport owners – and future owners. If so, the £15 would become a legal maximum – rather than the current £9. Even at £15, some airlines, and passengers might well decide instead to use much cheaper airports such as Stansted or Luton. GACC has pointed out to the Airports Commission the risk that Gatwick may have fewer passengers than forecast, in which case the cap of £15 may not be sufficient to cover the costs of a new runway and new terminal. Brendon Sewill asks: “What would happen if the money runs out when the new runway is only half built?”

Click here to view full story…

 

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Historic village of Harmondsworth, threatened by Heathrow 3rd runway, opens its doors on Sunday 12th April

The ancient village of Harmondsworth, which originated as a Saxon manor and is now facing demolition if a 3rd Heathrow runway is built to the north-west of the airport. It is staging an Open Day on Sunday 12th April to give the media and members of the public a chance to see what would be destroyed.  The focus of the event is the re-opening of the celebrated 15th-century Great Barn for the first time since the completion of major repairs by English Heritage.  The Barn, described by poet Sir John Betjeman as “the cathedral of Middlesex”, was saved from developers by the intervention of a group of determined villagers. There will also be the unveiling (1.30pm) of a huge mural, especially created for the occasion, illustrating the proposed airport boundary cutting through the heart of picturesque Harmondsworth.  There will be a visit to the newly-planted trees on the Recreation Ground which demonstrates that the community intends to fight to preserve its historic roots for future generations to enjoy, rather than watch it obliterated by further expansion of the airport.  And there will be Morris dancing at various times throughout the day, as well as walking tours. Organisers, SHE (Stop Heathrow Expansion) say this is a great opportunity to see the unique village of Harmondsworth, and “also to show to the world that we are utterly determined to fight for our homes and our community.  We will not be going anywhere else.” 
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Great Barn

Historic village threatened by 3rd runway opens its doors to the press and public on Sunday 12th April

The ancient village of Harmondsworth, which originated as a Saxon manor and is now facing demolition if a third Heathrow runway goes ahead, will be staging an Open Day on Sunday 12th April to give the media and members of the public a chance to see what would be destroyed.   Download the flyer here.   From 12 noon onwards. 

The focus of the event is the re-opening of the celebrated 15th-century Great Barn for the first time since the completion of major repairs by English Heritage.  The Barn, described by poet Sir John Betjeman as “the cathedral of Middlesex”, was saved from developers by the intervention of a group of determined villagers, who will be available to talk to visitors. It will be open from 11am until 4pm.  

[The Barn is a Grade I listed building. It is essentially unaltered since it was built in 1426 and over 95% of its structural timbers are original. It is owned by English Heritage who bought it in 2011 to add to the National Heritage Collection, and is managed for them by the Friends of the Great Barn. For more details ]

A huge mural, especially created for the occasion, will illustrate the proposed airport boundary cutting through the heart of picturesque Harmondsworth.  It will be unveiled at 1.30pm providing a photo-opportunity on the village green outside the historic Five Bells pub.

This will be followed by a visit to the newly-planted trees on the Recreation Ground which demonstrates that the community intends to fight to preserve its historic roots for future generations to enjoy, rather than watch it obliterated by further expansion of the airport.

[The tree-planting is part of a council-backed project to re-forest the villages threatened by a third runway.  It is a collaborative project between SHE, Transition Heathrow and Harts, the arts network based in the villages:  http://www.communityharts.org/ ]

There will be Morris dancing at various times throughout the day. Datchet Border Morris will be at the Great Barn at 12.00pm; outside the Crown pub at 12.45pm; outside the Five Bells pub at 14.00; and back to the Barn at 14.30pm.

SHE (Stop Heathrow Expansion) worked with the Friends of the Great Barn to organise the Open Day. Neil Keveren, the chair of SHE, said, “This is a great opportunity to see the unique village of Harmondsworth.  But it is also a chance for us to show to the world that we are utterly determined to fight for our homes and our community.  We will not be going anywhere else.”

He added, “We are thankful for the backing we have received from Hillingdon Council and from Harts, the community arts project”.

The Airports Commission has been examining potential sites for new runways in the South East and is expected to publish its final report in June.  It will recommend either a separate third runway at Heathrow, a third runway at Heathrow added to the existing northern runway (This runway would not require the destruction of Harmondsworth), or a second runway at Gatwick.  It would mean the demolition of properties in Poyle, west of the airport. The next Government will consider the recommendation but is not required to endorse it.

SHE  http://www.stopheathrowexpansion.co.uk/

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More information:

Neil Keveren, 07850904677

Christine Taylor 0208 564 8345; 07960490831

Justine Bayley (for info on the Barn), 020 8759 1874

 

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Schiphol airport unfazed by prospect of new London runway – many UK passengers prefer transferring from Schiphol

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis, described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”. Schiphol now handles up to 8 million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights. Schiphol believes passengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a 3rd runway. 13 UK airports have services to Amsterdam and this will rise to 14 next month, with the addition of Belfast.  The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in Heathrow’s lobbying for a new runway, wanting to prevent the loss of customers to Schiphol. And wanting to keep on being the biggest international airport, by far, in Europe.  Jos Nijhuis said: “We are London’s second hub and doing very well. …I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three….We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers.” KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside.” He felt higher charges needed by Heathrow to pay for a new runway would mean the runway would not reduce the traffic going via Schiphol.
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Schiphol unfazed by London airport expansion

Dutch aviation bosses talk in bullish terms about being London’s second hub and how a new runway in the UK’s southeast will fail to challenge that. Ian Taylor reportsPassengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a third runway.That is the view of Schiphol airport and of Dutch carrier KLM, which serves 13 UK airports from Amsterdam and will add a route from Belfast next month.The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in discussions about the need for expanded hub airport capacity for London.The government-appointed Airports Commission is due to report immediately after the May 7 general election, making recommendations on whether to add a runway at Heathrow or Gatwick.

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”.

The airport handles up to eight million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights.

Nijhuis said: “We have flights to 26 destinations in the UK; Heathrow has six. We are London’s second hub and doing very well.

“I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three.’”

KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers (pictured) said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside. Amsterdam is an attractive alternative to Heathrow because everything is under one roof.

“In Amsterdam, we have an airport that handles 55 million passengers a year in a country with a population of 17 million. Logistics is an integral part of the Netherlands economy.”

Nijhuis said: “We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers. Our competitive strength is the combination of hub and carrier [KLM]. It’s only possible to have a high proportion of transfer traffic if you make transfers as easy as possible. The airport has been designed to the specifications of KLM.”

Elbers conceded: “A third runway at Heathrow would impact our business.” But he put this down to the potential impact of increased charges at Heathrow to pay for runway construction.

“Heathrow is already not a cheap airport,” said Elbers. “We have discussions about the potential impact on the cost of operations. We will follow closely what happens.”

However, Elbers does not foresee a reduction in KLM’s operations at Heathrow even if KLM passengers have to pay higher charges to finance the airport’s expansion. He said: “We would be keen to have more slots at Heathrow. People will always go to London.”

Elbers pointed out that Schiphol could not expand unrestrictedly. “We have five runways and we are happy with that, but it does not mean we can do what we want,” he said.

“There are restrictions on the hours of the day we can operate, on the runways we can use at certain times and in certain weather.

“We have our challenges, mainly with the reduction of environmental impacts. There are potential limitations on the growth of Schiphol. They are political and environmental limitations, not physical, based on noise and pollution.”

Elbers was speaking this week as KLM launched a three-times-a-week service from Amsterdam to Bogota and Cali in Colombia.

http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/Articles/2015/04/02/53719/big-interview-schiphol-unfazed-by-london-airport-expansion.html

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See also

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to reduce number flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59.  They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral.  The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead.  The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges.  Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

 

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Access to expanded Heathrow could cost £20 billion, TfL warns – maybe £15 billion more from the taxpayer than Commission estimate

Transport for London (TfL) has raised “serious concerns” about congestion and the costs of expansion at Heathrow just weeks before the Airports Commission’s final recommendation is due (end of June?). TFL Response to APPG on Surface Access Feb 2015  In response to questions by Zac Goldsmith, TfL said both Heathrow and Commission had “significantly underestimated” the challenge of improving transport access to the site, with the Airports Commission estimating £5 billion would be enough to make the improvements. TfL believes to provide an optimal level of service, the figure would be nearer to £20 billion, raising questions about who would pay the additional costs. TfL said population growth of 37% by 2050 has also not been taken into account, with regards to the increased pressure on London’s roads and public transport infrastructure, Zac said: “TfL is better placed than any other organisation to understand the effects Heathrow expansion will have on London’s transport network, and it is extraordinary therefore that the Commission never bothered to ask for its assessment. This raises serious questions about the thoroughness and reliability of the Commission’s work. If TfL is right, the taxpayer may end up having to cough up an additional £15 billion to help Heathrow secure its monopoly, in addition to all the associated problems of gridlock, noise and air pollution.”
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Access to new Heathrow would cost £20 billion, Transport for London warns

1.4.2015 (Richmond – Your Local Guardian)

By Laura Proto

Transport for London (TfL) has raised “serious concerns” about congestion and the costs of expansion at Heathrow just weeks before the Airports Commission’s final recommendation is due. [ TFL Response to APPG on Surface Access Feb 2015 ]

TfL said both the airport and Commission HAD “significantly underestimated” the challenge of improving transport access to the site, with the Airports Commission estimating £5bn would be enough to make the improvements.

But TfL believes to provide an optimal level of service, the figure would be nearer to £20bn, raising questions about who would pay the additional costs.

The commission said building a third runway and its related assets would cost £18.5bn, excluding surface access.

A population growth of 37 per cent by 2050 has also not been taken into account in regards to the increased pressure on London’s roads and public transport infrastructure, TfL said.

The Airports Commission acknowledges that if the west London airport did expand, passengers would experience “very crowded conditions during peak times”, but TfL said it had underestimated the demand for surface access in 2030 by 25 per cent.

Daniel Moylan, Mayor of London’s chief adviser of aviation, said: “The Airports Commission’s assessment of the surface access impacts for an expanded Heathrow does not extend beyond 2030 and assumes a third runway to be barely a quarter full, which is not credible for an airport currently operating at over 98 per cent capacity.

“With that in mind it is hardly surprising that the commission has woefully underestimated the associated surface access cost by more than £10bn.”

TfL’s concerns were aired in a letter to the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Heathrow and the wider economy.

Zac Goldsmith, Conservative prospective parliamentary for Richmond Park and north Kingston, MP and chairman of the APPG, said: “TfL is better placed than any other organisation to understand the effects Heathrow expansion will have on London’s transport network, and it is extraordinary therefore that the commission never bothered to ask for its assessment.

“This raises serious questions about the thoroughness and reliability of the commission’s work. If TfL is right, the taxpayer may end up having to cough up an additional £15bn to help Heathrow secure its monopoly, in addition to all the associated problems of gridlock, noise and air pollution.”

Heathrow Appg website http://www.heathrowappg.com/tfl-response-to-appg-on-surface-access/

The TFL report is here TFL Response to APPG on Surface Access Feb 2015

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http://www.yourlocalguardian.co.uk/news/local/richmondnews/12716544.Access_to_new_Heathrow_would_cost___20bn__Transport_for_London_warns/

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Relevant paragraph from the TfL response:  Page 6

TfL costs of surface access Heathrow


 

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As it is, the economic benefit of a new Heathrow runway is hotly debated and highly uncertain.  The possible economic benefit of a new runway is calculated over a 60 year period, 2026 to 2086.

Sixty years.  . ie. not a huge amount of benefit per year, (£2 – 3 billion maximum, on a generous estimate) bearing in mind the huge tourism deficit (perhaps £10 – £13 billion per year; or the loss to the Treasury as air travel pays no VAT and no fuel duty, amounting to perhaps £10 billion per year).

But the Airports Commission estimate of £211 billion economic benefit from a new NW Heathrow runway comes with many caveats – by the Commission itself. They say the “results should be interpreted with caution.”

Heathrow up to £211 billion

So that benefit needs at least another £20 billion knocked off it for transport infrastructure – without even starting to consider the cost of social infrastructure required to support all the extra development in the area, and the influx of people.


 

See earlier

Heathrow display 2 versions of their “economic benefit” poster – one saying £100 billion, the other “up to £211 billion” …. (Over 60 years)

Heathrow airport has two different versions of its massive poster near Terminal 5. They have the same text, with claims of the alleged economic benefits to the UK of a new runway. One poster says “Expand Heathrow and you grow the economy by £100 billion.” And other nearby says “Expand Heathrow and you grow the economy by up to £211 billion.” They cannot both be right. Is this merely a matter of picking wildly different figures out of the air? Heathrow airport responded that: “£100bn was our conservative estimate. When the Airports Commission analysed it they estimated up to £211bn across UK.” What the massive posters fail to say it these purported benefit are not for one year. They are over a 60 year period, 2026 to 2086. ie. not a huge amount per year, (£2 – 3 billion maximum, on a generous estimate) bearing in mind the huge tourism deficit (perhaps £10 – £13 billion per year); or the loss to the Treasury as air travel pays no VAT and no fuel duty, (amounting to perhaps £10 billion per year). But the Airports Commission estimate of £211 billion economic benefit from a new NW Heathrow runway comes with many caveats – by the Commission itself. They say the “results should be interpreted with caution, given the innovative methodology used…” So more that are difficult to substantiate.

Click here to view full story…

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1st April. “Heathrow in secret plan to compulsory purchase Sunbury Golf Course for housing”

Unfortunately the story below was an April Fools joke.

Howewer, the number of homes to be demolished (783), the number of homes Heathrow has had to offer to buy (3,750), the shortage of land to build houses in areas around Heathrow, are all accurate and true.  So is the absence of any plan to move those who will have their homes compulsorily purchased to alternative sites, let alone to move people as a community.

Harmondsworth and Longford residents, who are facing the bulldozers if Heathrow’s north-west runway goes ahead, could be offered new homes on Sunbury Golf Course. Heathrow Airport Ltd are understood to have been in negotiation for the compulsory purchase of the golf centre site, that includes a popular 6,000-yard course. MPs and local authorities around Heathrow have expressed concern about the housing crisis in London and the South East, and the necessity to re-house those currently living in the 783 homes that will be destroyed. In addition Heathrow has offered to buy up 3,750 houses that will become almost uninhabitable due to the noise and air pollution. These people also need to be found new homes.  Heathrow bosses have been looking at possible solutions, wishing to be fair to local communities and foster community cohesion.They have therefore been in covert discussions with neighbouring councils during the past 6 months, to find suitable sites for the relocation of the villagers. Spelthorne Council, a strong supporter of a Heathrow 3rd runway, has played an important behind-the-scenes role in this search. Sunbury Golf Course site provides the ideal location.  The planning process for this major project is expected to be fast-tracked so that initial work can begin this autumn.

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Heathrow in secret plan to compulsory purchase Sunbury Golf Course for housing

1.4.2015  (SHE  – Stop Heathrow Expansion)

April Fools joke …. sadly Heathrow is not being this proactive … nor is there any such attractive solution …

Harmondsworth and Longford residents facing the Heathrow bulldozers could be offered new homes on Sunbury Golf Course if a secret plan goes ahead. Heathrow Airport Ltd are understood to have held negotiations with the Secretary of State, on compulsory purchase of the golf centre site that includes a popular 6,000-yard course.

MPs and local authorities around Heathrow have expressed concern that the housing crisis in London and the South East has become a major election issue and could mean that expansion at Heathrow in undeliverable.

The Airports Commission, which has been given the task of assessing the rival runway plans of Heathrow and Gatwick airports, will make its recommendation this summer on where a new south east runway should be built. The announcement is expected by the end of June., The Commission considers that a minimum of 783 homes would be destroyed if Heathrow builds the proposed north west runway, although anti-expansion campaigners claim that the initial figure will be 289 higher.

Harmondsworth village centre

In December 2014,  immediately prior to Sir Howard Davies holding a consultation event in Sipson, Heathrow announced that it would offer to buy up to 3,750 properties in villages to the north of airport, which are likely to be severely affected by aircraft noise and pollution.  The village of Longford would be completely destroyed, while Harmondsworth would be reduced to a few homes, a church and an historical barn.

The remaining villages of Sipson and Harlington would be severely affected by noise and pollution.  Heathrow says it will buy these homes from current residents and fit soundproofing before, before renting them out to airport workers at market value.  This happened, but without the soundproofing, to 238 homes in Sipson and Harmondsworth that were purchased by the airport in 2010.

Discussions are now taking place to see if the occupants of the homes to be compulsorily purchased could be re-housed within the M25.

Fearing that the Airports Commission has concerns about the impact on community cohesion of the mass demolitions and the lack of suitable affordable housing in the area for those displaced, Heathrow bosses have been looking at possible solutions.  Heathrow has expressed its wish to be fair to local communities,and have raised the issue of community cohesion.

The impact on community cohesion, caused by the mass demolitions and the lack of suitable affordable housing in the areas for those displaced, were raised in submissions to the Airports Commission consultation, that ended on 3rd February. Heathrow bosses have been looking at possible solutions and now acknowledge it will be necessary to create entirely new villages within nearby boroughs, to accommodate those displaced.

April Fools joke …. sadly Heathrow is not being this proactive … nor is there any such attractive solution …

Heathrow has been in covert discussions with neighbouring councils during the past 6 months, to find suitable sites for the relocation of the villagers. While some areas south of Heathrow have been ruled out due to planned changes in the road network to accommodate the increased traffic from the extended coach station and freight depot, Laleham, Ashford and Shepperton are thought to be still under consideration.  Surrey Future, a group that brings together Surrey’s local authorities and business leaders, has already revealed that it has been working with the Airports Commission to find solutions that will lead to a recommendation favouring Heathrow expansion.

Spelthorne Council, a strong supporter of a Heathrow 3rd runway, has played an important behind-the-scenes role in this search.  It is believed that council officials suggested Heathrow’s current publicity slogan, “Those living around us are behind us” as a means of countering any resistance to development plans.

Spelthorne is currently consulting on the borough’s housing strategy, which includes a warning that in a borough that because it is 17% water and 65% Green Belt, no site is totally safe from housing development. The borough needs to build at least 160 homes a year until 2026, even without the need to rehouse those displaced by building another Heathrow runway.  The Airports Commission states that the lure of new airport-related jobs will bring 70,000 people into the area, who Spelthorne hopes to welcome.

After deciding that Sunbury Golf Course site provides the ideal location to satisfy angry residents forced to relocate from the Heathrow Villages, Spelthorne Conservative Councillors have formed a partnership with designers employed by the Chinese Sovereign Wealth Fund, co-owners of Heathrow.  They have been working in secret to build a replica copy of Harmondsworth and Longford to illustrate to the Secretary of State the feasibility and desirability of the plans. And to make the new residents feel more at home.

A source working within the partnership, who asked not be named, said “Heathrow will be making a substantial profit for its shareholders once a third runway is built so spending £5 billion on housing in Spelthorne is no problem. We aim to focus on the positives like more jobs in hospitality and construction, faster roads and more flights to India and China.  Everyone will be a winner, even those losing their communities and old buildings will get a new purpose-built estate.  There could be funding from the EU Infrastructure Asset Investment Trust to help with the cost, so that will reduce the cost to British taxpayers”.

The planning process for this major project is expected to be fast-tracked so that initial work can begin this autumn.  The Sunbury Golf Clubhouse will be commandeered to house some of the senior project management team who will also oversee the brick by brick dismantling and rebuilding of key buildings from Harmondsworth and Longford.  This could include St Mary the Virgin church in Harmondsworth, where the Great Tithe Barn has just undergone adaptations to enable it to be moved to the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum if necessary.

Sunbury Golf Course Clubhouse

 

April Fools joke …. sadly Heathrow is not being this proactive … nor is there any such attractive solution …

Recruitment teams will travel to Eastern Europe to recruit some of the 10,000 construction workers who will be needed for the first phase of demolition and redevelopment.  They will be housed in 2,000 Portacabins at Laleham Cricket Club, which will be renamed Heathrow Workers’ City.  This will provide a welcome boost for the local economy, especially Staines Shopping Centre.

An anonymous source at Spelthorne Borough Council said, “We feel privileged to be paving the way for a fourth runway to make Heathrow better AND bigger.  Frankly, when Heathrow turns up with wheelbarrows full of cash from its Chinese and Qatari owners it’s impossible to say no. In a few years time everyone will have forgotten the golf course and the old duffers who used it, they’ll have a whole new development, that’s progress.   Heathrow is promising to end youth unemployment with apprenticeships to teach them how to serve food, sell duty-free goods and make hotel beds.  Kevin Harman, speaking on behalf of the Heathrow Hub option, told us that there will be plenty of work in security because there is a lot of money in terrorism.  Honestly, I’m not joking. He said that at a public meeting when he said there’d be more jobs.”

A golfer, Conservative voter and retired airline worker who is close to the Sunbury Golf Club Committee stated that he’d been persuaded to wave goodbye to the club by the promise of jobs, jobs and more jobs.  He quipped “Heathrow replacing beauty with concrete is par for the course.”

Sidney Sciurus, who considers himself a typical Back Heathrow supporter said, “If you build blocks of flats you could solve the housing problem and make way for even more runways. I love the new quiet planes.  People who complain about being woken up at 4am should get double glazing. It’s nuts to stand in the way of Heathrow’s foreign owners just because they don’t have to live here with the extra pollution.

He continued, “I live far enough away that it doesn’t affect me so the sooner they dig up Sunbury Golf Club the better.  No ifs, no buts, bring on the bulldozers!

Stop-Heathrow-Expansion-SHE-logo http://www.stopheathrowexpansion.co.uk/

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Full version at http://www.stopheathrowexpansion.co.uk/secret-plan-to-compulsory-purchase-sunbury-golf-course-for-housing-2/

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April Fools joke …. sadly Heathrow is not being this proactive … nor is there any such attractive solution …

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CAGNE sends complaint to Airports Commission on poor level of local engagement by Gatwick

CAGNE, the local group set up in 2014 at Gatwick, in response to the trial of new, concentrated flight paths, has written to the Airports Commission, to complain about the activities of Gatwick Airport.  Local groups have persistently complained that senior airport staff have declined invitations to attend meetings of communities around the airport. The airport is aware of the huge amount of local opposition. Instead, Gatwick has focused its advertising money and its PR on the London area. It has also contacted a large number of councils, in areas closer to Heathrow (where a Heathrow runway would be opposed) to try to get them to support a Gatwick runway instead. CAGNE points out that the Airports Commission’s own work, in its Appraisal  Framework, expects runway scheme promoters will show “evidence of sustained and meaningful engagement with local and community stakeholders including highlighting any changes of features of scheme designs arising as a result of this engagement.”  The Commission also expects the runway promoters to work on managing their “engagement with communities throughout the lifespan of the proposed project, including the period after any new infrastructure is delivered.”  CAGNE has little confidence, considering the poor record of Gatwick airport so far, in its future engagement with local people. 
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CAGNE has made an official complaint to the Airports Commission

30.3.2015 (CAGNE – Communities Against Gatwick Noise and Emissions)

CAGNE, Communities Against Gatwick Noise and Emissions, has made an official complaint to the Airports Commission about the “unethical” actions of Gatwick’s PR team.

Email exchanges between representatives of Gatwick’s PR team and local parish councils in the Heathrow area expose Gatwick’s efforts to encourage local authorities around Heathrow to campaign for Gatwick.

Commenting on the complaint, Pavey explained:

“Gatwick has deliberately avoided open consultation with its most important stakeholders – local residents. 

“We’ve now discovered that all this time they’ve actively encouraged Heathrow’s local authorities to support a second runway. It’s unethical and must be challenged.

“The fact remains that 12 local authorities and 8  local area MPs around Gatwick do not support their plans. It’s no wonder, given  that a second runway would destroy the tranquillity of Sussex, not to mention Gatwick’s complete disregard of local concerns.”

Given the deliberate lack of consultation by Gatwick executives with its own neighbours in Sussex, CAGNE believe the resourcing of a number of full time staff to consult with Heathrow locals is unethical and is in open defiance of the Commission’s appraisal framework.

CAGNE’s letter to the Commission states that: “The Commission believes that it is important for local communities most affected by airport development to be properly engaged and consulted. The Commission wishes to examine how scheme promoters intend to manage their engagement with communities throughout the lifespan of the proposed project, including the period after any new infrastructure is delivered.”  [Section 16.3 Airports Commission Appraisal Framework. April 2014. Page 119. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/300223/airports-commission-appraisal-framework.pdf ]

The first time concerned residents in Sussex were able to ask questions of executives from Gatwick was at the Airports Commission public consultation day on 16th December.

The issue of the resourcing of Gatwick staff to consult with Heathrow communities was raised at the last GATCOM (Gatwick’s consultative committee) meeting.  Gatwick executive, Charles Kirwan-Taylor, suggested this is standard practice and that Heathrow would have done the same.

However, none of the Gatwick area councils at that meeting have received such a communication from Heathrow executives encouraging them to vote for expansion at Heathrow instead of Gatwick.

The fact that Gatwick is spending millions of pounds in advertising and posters in London and around Heathrow, but none locally, reinforces the view Gatwick have not consulted or engaged properly with local residents or councils.  They are not providing any of the facts such as how a 2nd runway would cost the Government billions of ££s of taxpayers’ money for social, as well as transport,  infrastructure. The issue of the cost to the taxpayer is a key factor that the local authorities and MPs have recognised.  However, Gatwick is selective with its figures and avoided the issue of cost to the public purse.

www.cagne.org

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The Airports Commission  Appraisal Framework also said one of the expected outputs of the assessment was:

“Evidence of sustained and meaningful engagement with local and community stakeholders including highlighting any changes of features of scheme designs arising as a result of this engagement.”   Page 122 on Appraisal Framework 


 

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Letter from CAGNE to the Airports Commission

18th March 2015

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Sir Howard Davies

Airports Commission

Sanctuary Buildings

20 Great Smith Street

London SW1P 3BT

 

Dear Sir Howard

CAGNE would like to make a formal complaint about the actions of Gatwick Airport’s Public Relations executive relating to the attached email sent to residents and councils around Heathrow. It is now quite clear that many Commission submissions made from councils in West London have been led and worded by Gatwick.

Given the deliberate lack of consultation by Gatwick executives with its own neighbours in Sussex and Kent, the resourcing of a number of full time staff to consult with Heathrow locals is unethical and is in open defiance of your Commission’s appraisal framework.

It states that “The Commission believes that it is important for local communities most affected by airport development to be properly engaged and consulted. The Commission wishes to examine how scheme promoters intend to manage their engagement with communities throughout the lifespan of the proposed project, including the period after any new infrastructure is delivered.”                                           [Section 16.3 Airports Commission Appraisal Framework. April 2014. Page 119. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/300223/airports-commission-appraisal-framework.pdf ]

As you are aware, the first time concerned residents in Sussex and Kent were able to ask questions of executives from Gatwick was at the Airports Commission public consultation. Since that time, Gatwick have resumed their policy of obfuscation relating to the expansion plans of the airport and the effect on our communities.

The resourcing of Gatwick staff to consult with Heathrow communities was raised at the last GATCOM meeting and Gatwick executive, Charles Kirwan Taylor, suggested this is standard practice and that Heathrow would have done the same.

None of the councils at that meeting have received such a communication from Heathrow executives encouraging them to vote for expansion at Heathrow instead of Gatwick.

The fact that Gatwick is spending millions of pounds in advertising and posters around Heathrow and none locally, reinforces the fact Gatwick have not consulted or engaged with local residents or councils.

By ignoring this key part of the appraisal framework, it is no surprise that 12 local authorities, 8 MPs, airlines, big business and residents groups that surround Gatwick all oppose expansion would suggest we have been totally ignored by Gatwick management.

On this basis alone, the submission by Gatwick as a short-listed option for the Airports Commission should be withdrawn.

Thank you.

Yours faithfully

Sally Pavey

Chair of CAGNE

www.cagne.org

Email cagnegatwick@gmail.com

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cc Prime Minister David Cameron

Rt Hon Patrick McLoughlin

Rt Hon Francis Maude MP

Crispin Blunt MP

Nick Herbert MP

Sir Nicholas Soames MP

Charles Hendry MP

Sam Gyimah MP

Sir John Stanley MP

Sir Paul Beresford MP

Henry Smith MP

George Osborne MP

 

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Text of email from Gatwick airport to local councils around Heathrow to get them to back a Gatwick runway.

From: Russell Guthrie [mailto:Russell.Guthrie@gatwickairport.com]

Sent: 15 January 2015 14:12

To:  ………….. X   Y  Z

Subject:  Supporting Gatwick

 

Dear parish council and residents association

I hope you don’t mind the unsolicited email, but I have been prompted to write to you after being contacted by several other parish councils and residents associations in the Heathrow area recently.   All of them expressed concern about the effect of Heathrow’s third runway plan and asked whether there was anything their members could do to support a new runway at Gatwick.

The simple answer is yes – there are two things your members could do if they choose.  I have highlighted both methods below and, assuming you think the cause is worthwhile, I wondered if you would be willing to ‘cascade’ this information to all your members via email or any other method at your disposal?

The first way to support Gatwick is by responding to the Airports Commission’s consultation telling them why you oppose a third runway at Heathrow. The consultation closes on Tuesday 3 February so there is not a great deal of time left to do this.  I have set out how to respond online, via email and by post below, and have also attached a summary of why we think Gatwick has the stronger case to build a new runway. These may help people fill out the consultation form more quickly and easily, although respondents do not have to answer every question on the form.

The second way to support Gatwick is to register your support.  The Airports Commission will be made aware of total number of people supporting Gatwick, so it is important that as many people as possible register their support.

Should you wish to respond to the consultation, please make your voice heard before 3 February by emailing the Airports Commission at airports.consultation@systra.com, by filling in their online survey or by writing to:  …. address given …)

How do I register my support for Gatwick? Simply fill in your name and email address on the website linked to below: http://www.gatwickobviously.com/mailing-list-sign-up/standard

Why is Gatwick the right location for a new runway?  See attached document.  (not attached here).

My Colleague Hannah Staunton, Head of Community Engagement at Gatwick Airport can answer any questions you might have & can be contacted on community@gatwickairport.com

Kindest Regards,

Russell Guthrie

Senior Media Campaigns Manager

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Heathrow display 2 versions of their “economic benefit” poster – one saying £100 billion, the other “up to £211 billion” … (Over 60 years)

Heathrow airport has two different versions of its massive poster near Terminal 5. They have the same text,  with claims of the alleged economic benefits to the UK of a new runway.  One poster says “Expand Heathrow and you grow the economy by £100 billion.” And other nearby says “Expand Heathrow and you grow the economy by up to £211 billion.”  They cannot both be right.  Is this merely a matter of picking wildly different figures out of the air?  Heathrow airport responded that:  “£100bn was our conservative estimate. When the Airports Commission analysed it they estimated up to £211bn across UK.”  What the massive posters fail to say it these purported benefit are not for one year. They are over a 60 year period, 2026 to 2086. ie. not a huge amount per year, (£2 – 3 billion maximum, on a generous estimate) bearing in mind the huge tourism deficit (perhaps £10 – £13 billion per year); or the loss to the Treasury as air travel pays no VAT and no fuel duty, (amounting to perhaps £10 billion per year). But the Airports Commission estimate of £211 billion economic benefit from a new NW Heathrow runway comes with many caveats – by the Commission itself.  They say the “results should be interpreted with caution, given the innovative methodology used…”   So more that are difficult to substantiate.

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Two huge Heathrow adverts, spotted today by an observant passer by near Terminal 5 on 28th March 2015. They are Heathrow claims about  the amount of economic growth that it might bring to the UK if it gets a 3rd runway.

One says it will expand the economy by “£100 billion.” The other identical poster says it will be “up to £211 billion.”

£100_billion_20150328_094745 smaller  March 2015

£211_billion_20150328_094558_smaller_march_2015

That is actually quite a large difference …. not an insignificant difference … Over £100 billion.

As a local wit commented: “Heathrow cut their UK economy forecast by more than 50% but fail to inform the Davies Commission.”

Heathrow airport, commenting on these two nearby posters up, with entirely different claims about alleged benefits of a new runway, (£100 billion or up to £211 billion) says that: “£100bn was our conservative estimate. When the Airports Commission analysed it they estimated up to £211bn across UK.”

That benefit is over a 60 year period, 2026 to 2086.

Sixty years.  . ie. not a huge amount of benefit per year, (£2 – 3 billion maximum, on a generous estimate) bearing in mind the huge tourism deficit (perhaps £10 – £13 billion per year; or the loss to the Treasury as air travel pays no VAT and no fuel duty, amounting to perhaps £10 billion per year).

But the Airports Commission estimate of £211 billion economic benefit from a new NW Heathrow runway comes with many caveats – by the Commission itself. They say the “results should be interpreted with caution.”

Heathrow up to £211 billion

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