CAGNE points out that Gatwick’s planned local consultation events ignore most areas worst impacted by noise

Local group CAGNE has written to Gatwick to express their concern that the consultation events for the Gatwick Master Plan, including adding over 30% more flights per year,  are being held in peripheral areas that are not constantly, if at all, affected by aircraft noise. The Gatwick “Master Plan”, launched on 18th October, reveals plans to use the emergency runway and continue to safeguard the land for a 2nd runway, providing details of a three-runway airport eventually. CAGNE commented that the 5 consultation events planned are not in the areas where people will be experiencing the worst noise problems, or those getting noise for the first time. The events are in areas like Crawley, Brighton and Croydon – where there may be support for the expansion, and people are not affected negatively. Many people in areas to be affected in future are probably totally unaware of what is being proposed by the airport. By holding events in areas like Croydon, Gatwick hopes it can manipulate the responses to their loaded questionnaire whilst avoiding holding events in affected areas as Reigate, Redhill, Dorking, Alfold, Lingfield and Copthorne. Everyone in areas to be affected, including the elderly and those without internet access, should be given full information.

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Gatwick’s plans ignore those impacted the most by noise!

20.10.2018

(CAGNE press release – Communities Against Gatwick Noise and Emissions)

CAGNE has written to Gatwick today to show unhappiness that the consultation events for the Gatwick Master Plan* are being held in peripheral areas that are not constantly, if at all, affected by aircraft noise.

Gatwick launched its 5/15-year master plan last week (18th October) in it detailing the usage of the emergency runway and safeguarding the land for a second runway, providing details of a three-runway airport.

CAGNE comment:

“These are the very communities that need to participate as they will be the ones that will take the full brunt of Gatwick’s increase in noise and may be totally unaware of what is being proposed by the airport.

It is simply not acceptable for Gatwick to think they can get away with holding events in Brighton and Croydon so that they can manipulate the responses to their loaded questionnaire whilst avoiding holding events in affected areas as Reigate, Redhill, Dorking, Alfold, Lingfield and Copthorne.

If we thought the whole proposal of using the emergency runway was underhand, Gatwick would seem to be going out of their way to ignore the communities that suffer the severity of Gatwick aircraft noise now 24/7 with no respite.  These communities will find themselves facing over 80,000 extra flights a year if Gatwick are successful at manipulating the responses, the local authorities who they have already presented their plans to in Crawley.

CAGNE demand that every parish that is impacted to the west, east, north and south have an event and that every member of these areas be written to by Gatwick with a copy of the master plan so not to discriminate against the elderly or those without the internet.”

The consultation runs for 12 weeks – finishing at 5pm on 10th January 2019.

These are their public events, where people can find out more :

  • Saturday 3 November – 15:30-19:30
    The Barn, Causeway, Horsham, RH12 1HE
  • Thursday 8 November – 15:30-19:30
    Centrale Shopping Centre, Croydon, CR0 1TY
  • Saturday 10 November – 11:00-17:00
    Royal Victoria Place Shopping Centre, Tunbridge Wells, TN1 2SS
  • Monday 12 November – 15:30-19:30
    Churchill Square Shopping Centre, Western Road, Brighton, BN1 2RG
  • Saturday 17 November – 11:00-1700
    County Mall Shopping Centre, Crawley, RH10 1FG 

*Master plan detailed – https://www.gatwickairport.com/globalassets/business–community/growing-gatwick/draft-masterplan-consultation-doc_18oct.pdf

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Canada Pension Plan Investment Board is looking to buy part of GIP’s 42% stake in Gatwick

The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board is looking to buy part of a stake in Gatwick airport that could be worth more than 3 billion pounds $3.92 billion, Sky News on Friday. CPPIB is said to be part of a group of investors proposing to buy out Global Infrastructure Partner’s (GIP) 42% stake in the second-busiest airport in Britain, the Sky News report said.  The Canadian pension fund would invest “hundreds of millions of pounds” in the airport, if the deal gets finalised, insiders told Sky News.
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CPPIB looks to buy stake worth 3 bln stg in Gatwick Airport

October 19, 2018

By Reuters

The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board is looking to buy part of a stake in Gatwick airport that could be worth more than 3 billion pounds $3.92 billion, Sky News on Friday.

CPPIB is said to be part of a group of investors proposing to buy out Global Infrastructure Partner’s (GIP) 42% stake in the second-busiest airport in Britain, the Sky News report said.

The Canadian pension fund would invest “hundreds of millions of pounds” in the airport, if the deal gets finalised, insiders told Sky News.

https://www.nasdaq.com/article/cppib-looks-to-buy-stake-worth-3-bln-stg-in-gatwick-airport-20181019-00758

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Gatwick’s subterfuge with its emergency runway – or a 2nd runway, by any other name

In response to Gatwick airport announcing they plan to use their emergency runway, as a 2nd runway, local campaign, Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) Chairman, Peter Barclay, said, “We strongly oppose any 2nd runway at Gatwick and it will fight this proposal tooth and nail.” The Emergency Runway is located parallel to and only approximately 190m north of the main runway. Planning permission for the emergency runway was granted solely on the basis that – under no circumstances – could it be used in conjunction with the main runway. The CAA permission is that only one runway can be used at a time, and the emergency runway can only be used if the main runway is out of action. New planning consent (DCO) from Crawley council would be needed for the change of use, and also consent from the CAA and other safety bodies. Peter said: “The proposal, which may bring in excess of 80,000 additional flights a year, will simply increase the problems already being experienced by local communities – noise, air pollution and excessive road traffic. It would also put even greater pressure on the tottering road and rail infrastructure both locally and further afield. … Gatwick is attempting to get a 2nd runway via the back door, as it were.”
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Gatwick’s Subterfuge or a Runway by any other name

GACC – (Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign)Press release

18th  October, 2018

Gatwick Airport today launched its Five Year Master Plan, which includes a proposal to convert the existing Emergency Runway into a fully active second runway.

Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign Chairman, Peter Barclay, said, “We strongly oppose any second runway at Gatwick and it will fight this proposal tooth and nail.”

The Emergency Runway is located parallel to and approximately 190m north of the Main Runway. Planning permission for it was granted solely on the basis that under no circumstances could the Emergency Runway be used in conjunction with the Main Runway.

The  Civil Aviation Authority approval also only permits the use of one or the other runways, thus the Emergency Runway may currently only be used when the Main Runway is out of action due to an incident or during maintenance.

Peter Barclay went on to say that, “The proposal, which may bring in excess of 80,000 additional flights a year, will simply increase the problems already being experienced by local communities – noise, air pollution and excessive road traffic. It would also put even greater pressure on the tottering road and rail infrastructure both locally and further afield.

The legal agreement prohibiting a second runway at Gatwick expires in August 2019 and it would appear the airport is attempting to get a second runway via the back door as it were. Any proposal to bring the Emergency Runway into operation will need approval from the CAA and other safety bodies, as well as needing planning permission for Change of Use.”

The use of the Emergency Runway in conjunction with the Main Runway will substantially increase the noise and health impacts on residents living to the north of the airport. Additionally, the increase in the number of flights would have considerable noise impacts on those beneath the now concentrated departure and arrivals flight paths to both the east and west of the airport.

Peter Barclay concluded,  “People will feel angry and deceived following parliament’s overwhelming decision in June to confirm the government’s earlier choice of Heathrow for the site of additional runway capacity in the south-east.”

We will study the proposals with care and advise our members how best to respond to the Master Plan during the twelve week consultation period.”

http://www.gacc.org.uk/

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See also

Gatwick opens 12 week consultation on using its emergency runway, for some take-offs, adding 30% + more flights

Gatwick has announced its draft “Master Plan” which (quote) “sets out how Gatwick can grow and do more for Britain.”  In order to cram more flights into a one-runway airport, they hope to make more use of their emergency runway, parallel but close to the main runway. It is too near to be used properly as a second runway, on safety grounds.There will now be a 12 week consultation period on the plans, and Gatwick hopes to finalise its plans some time into 2019. The plans also include how the airport hopes to “meet future aviation demand with sustainable growth” (sic) into the 2030s. Under its 40-year current planning agreement, Gatwick’s existing standby runway is only used when the main runway is closed for maintenance or emergencies. But Gatwick hopes it “could potentially bring its existing standby runway into routine use for departing flights, alongside its main runway, by the mid-2020s.”  This could mean a maximum of 390,000 flights annually (P. 88) compared to 290,000 in 2016, (ie. about 34% more.). That could mean up to 70 million annual passengers, compared to 43 million now – and a current theoretical maximum of 61 million (ie. about 15% more). “We would be able to add between 10 and 15 additional hourly aircraft movements in the peak hours.” (P.10)   Oh …. and  with no extra noise …. obviously….

Click here to view full story…

 

Gatwick publishes plans to develop second runway

FT Financial Times

18th October 2018

Airport hopes to convert existing standby strip rather than build from scratch

Gatwick, the UK’s second-busiest airport, has published proposals to move its standby runway to use it for short-haul flights by the mid-2020s.

In its draft master plan released on Thursday, Gatwick said the standby runway would have to be moved 12 metres to the north away from the main runway at a cost of about £500m to comply with international safety regulations.

Stewart Wingate, Gatwick’s chief executive, called the idea “innovative”. “Our draft master plan offers agile, productive and low-impact ways of unlocking much-needed new capacity and increased resilience from within our existing infrastructure,” he said.

Gatwick predicted that using the second runway could raise the airport’s capacity from 281,000 flights in 2017-18 to 375,000-390,000 by 2032-33. Passenger numbers would increase from 45.7m to 68m-70m over the same period if the runway project went ahead.

The standby runway would not be lengthened so could not be used for long-haul flights, according to the plans.

Local campaigners reacted angrily to Gatwick’s proposals, saying noise pollution and traffic congestion would increase. Sally Pavey, of Communities Against Gatwick Noise Emissions, said the idea was “farcical” that Gatwick would negotiate over limiting noise and traffic and called life under Gatwick’s flight paths “absolute hell”.

Peter Barclay, of the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign GACC, said new technology that allowed more precise navigation had meant that noise was “much more concentrated than it used to be”. He added that the airport was now “more responsive” to local concerns than a few years ago but added its attitude could still be dismissive.

Mr Wingate said Gatwick’s noise footprint had shrunk 4% in 2017 and that quieter new aeroplanes would continue to replace older, noisier ones. But the master plan conceded that Gatwick had “not yet completed a full assessment of environmental impacts of the standby runway scheme”.

Any expansion plans would face a public consultation, probably in 2019, and the airport would have to apply for a development consent order, a streamlined planning process for nationally important infrastructure projects.

In a 2015 report, the Airports Commission recommended that Gatwick should not have a full-length second runway, instead awarding a third to Heathrow. However, it also recognised that the UK needed to “improve the use of existing capacity”, which Gatwick has taken to mean bringing its standby runway into regular use rather than building a new one.

The report said it preferred Heathrow to Gatwick because the latter was “unlikely to provide as much of the [long-haul] capacity which is most urgently required”. However, Mr Wingate denied that, saying the airport had delivered “15-20 new long-haul services in the last year alone”.

In addition to the proposed £500m for bringing the standby runway into use, Gatwick has already committed to spending £1.1bn on improvements between 2018 and 2023. The proposal comes in the wake of media reports that private equity firm Global Infrastructure Partners, which owns 42% of Gatwick, was interested in selling its stake.

Ms Pavey said: “This is purely about insinuating to whoever buys their shares that there is the possibility of additional capacity for that runway.”

https://www.ft.com/content/352f29c8-d2b0-11e8-a9f2-7574db66bcd5

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Read more »

Gatwick opens 12 week consultation on using its emergency runway, for some take-offs, adding 30% + more flights

Gatwick has announced its draft “Master Plan” which (quote) “sets out how Gatwick can grow and do more for Britain.”  In order to cram more flights into a one-runway airport, they hope to make more use of their emergency runway, parallel but close to the main runway. It is too near to be used properly as a second runway, on safety grounds. There will now be a 12 week consultation period on the plans, and Gatwick hopes to finalise its plans some time into 2019. The plans also include how the airport hopes to “meet future aviation demand with sustainable growth” (sic) into the 2030s. Under its 40-year current planning agreement, Gatwick’s existing standby runway is only used when the main runway is closed for maintenance or emergencies. But Gatwick hopes it “could potentially bring its existing standby runway into routine use for departing flights, alongside its main runway, by the mid-2020s.”  This could mean a maximum of 390,000 flights annually (P. 88) compared to 290,000 in 2016, (ie. about 34% more.). That could mean up to 70 million annual passengers, compared to 43 million now – and a current theoretical maximum of 61 million (ie. about 15% more). “We would be able to add between 10 and 15 additional hourly aircraft movements in the peak hours.” (P.10)   Oh …. and  with no extra noise …. obviously….

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More details from Gatwick:

https://www.gatwickairport.com/business-community/growing-gatwick/long-term-plans/

The full Draft Master Plan:

https://www.gatwickairport.com/globalassets/business–community/growing-gatwick/gatwick-draft-master-plan-final.pdf

Summary Document:
https://www.gatwickairport.com/globalassets/business–community/growing-gatwick/draft-masterplan-consultation-doc_18oct.pdf

 

Gatwick sets out ambitious future growth plan, including routine use of its existing standby runway

18/10/2018   (Gatwick Airport press release)

  • Draft master plan sets out how Gatwick can grow and do more for Britain
  • For the first time, the airport explores the innovative use of its existing standby runway, which would meet all international safety requirements
  • Gatwick is keen to listen to views with local communities and stakeholders encouraged to take part in 12-week consultation, which opens today

Gatwick Airport has today set out an ambitious vision for the future with the publication of its draft master plan, which looks at how the airport might grow in the longer term. The draft master plan is being announced to the airport’s independent consultative committee GATCOM which meets today.

As the UK enters a new chapter, Gatwick’s development will help meet future aviation demand with sustainable growth and ensure strong connections between Britain and global markets. It will also provide new opportunities for the South East and continue to bolster the local economy for future generations.

The publication of Gatwick’s draft master plan reflects Department for Transport guidance for airports to provide regular updates on their long-term plans, and responds to the Government’s recent call for airports to ‘make best use of their existing runways’.

Gatwick remains committed to sustainable growth in this draft master plan, building on our record which has seen the Carbon Trust naming Gatwick as the best performer for combined reduction of operational carbon, water and waste impacts in the past two years – all while passenger numbers continued to grow.

The draft master plan considers how Gatwick could grow across three scenarios, looking ahead to the early 2030s:

1. Main runway – using new technology to increase capacity

In the near term, the airport has considered how deploying new technology could increase the capacity of the main runway, offering incremental growth through more efficient operations. Gatwick has successfully utilised its runway to unlock growth in recent years and remains the world’s most efficient single runway. The use of the latest technology could provide more opportunities for the future.

2. Standby runway – bringing existing standby runway into routine use

Under its current planning agreement, Gatwick’s existing standby runway is only used when the main runway is closed for maintenance or emergencies. However, the 40-year planning agreement will come to an end in 2019. The draft master plan sets out for the first time how Gatwick could potentially bring its existing standby runway into routine use for departing flights, alongside its main runway, by the mid-2020s.

This innovative development, which would meet all international safety requirements, would be delivered without increasing the airport’s noise footprint and provide greater operational resilience. While in the early stages of exploration, Gatwick is confident the project would remain within the existing airport footprint and existing framework for airport charges. Should the airport decide to further progress the use of the existing standby runway, it would submit a detailed planning proposal and follow a Development Consent Order (DCO) process, which would include a full public consultation.

3. Additional runway – safeguarding for the future

While Gatwick is not currently actively pursuing the option of building a brand new runway to the south of the airport – as it did through the Airports Commission process – Gatwick believes it is in the national interest to continue to safeguard this land for the future as part of its draft master plan.

The airport is now keen to encourage responses to a 12-week public consultation it has launched today to gather feedback and views on the draft master plan. All responses will be reviewed before a final version of the master plan is agreed early next year.

The draft master plan can be read here. More information on the consultation, including events the airport will be holding to gather feedback, is available here.

Stewart Wingate, Chief Executive Officer, London Gatwick said:

“Our draft master plan marks the start of a new phase for Gatwick – building on what has made the airport the success it is today, and pioneering again to take advantage of the exciting opportunities that lie ahead.

“As the UK heads towards an important new chapter, Gatwick’s growing global connections are needed more than ever but this must be achieved in the most sustainable way. From using new technologies on our main runway, to the innovative proposal to bring our existing standby runway into routine use, our draft master plan offers agile, productive and low-impact ways of unlocking much-needed new capacity and increased resilience from within our existing infrastructure.

“Gatwick’s growth has been built through partnership so as we look ahead at our future development, we want to shape these plans together with our local communities, our passengers, our airlines and partners. We would encourage as many people as possible to take part in our consultation process. This will help shape our plans for securing the region’s prosperity.”

Henry Smith, Member of Parliament for Crawley, said:

“Crawley’s prosperity depends on the success of Gatwick Airport and the publication of this new draft master plan goes a long way to securing future growth in the town. I have always supported the airport growing within its existing boundaries and welcome their exciting new vision for incremental growth that will support more jobs and opportunity in Crawley.”

Tim Wates, Chairman of the Coast to Capital Local Enterprise Partnership, said:

“A strong and growing Gatwick airport as the beating heart of the Coast to Capital region is the central theme of the LEP’s strategic vision, so we welcome the publication of Gatwick’s master plan today and wholeheartedly support its vision for future growth.”

Carolyn Fairbairn, CBI Director-General, said:

“Now more than ever, unlocking new aviation capacity to deliver global trade links is critical for a strong UK economy. London’s airports are set to be full in the next decade, so the CBI welcomes Gatwick’s highly productive proposals to deliver increased capacity that complements expansion schemes at other airports. This will drive trade and investment, create new jobs and help British businesses thrive.”

Norwegian CEO Bjorn Kjos said:

“Our cooperation with Gatwick Airport has given us a strong platform to deliver more consumers lower fares on intercontinental flights. As we continue our global growth, we welcome any increases in airport capacity in the Greater London Area that support our commercial interests and ultimately benefit consumers.”

ENDS

About London Gatwick

Gatwick Airport is the UK’s second largest airport and the most efficient single-runway airport in the world. It serves more than 240 destinations in 74 countries for 45 million passengers a year on short and long-haul point-to-point services.

It is also a major economic driver for the UK contributing £5.3 billion to national GDP and generating 85,000 jobs nationally, with around 24,000 on the wider airport campus alone. The airport is south of Central London with excellent public transport links, including the Gatwick Express, and is part of the Oyster contactless payment network.

Gatwick Airport is owned by a group of international investment funds, of which Global Infrastructure Partners is the largest shareholder.

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/press-releases/2018/2018-10-18-gatwick-sets-out-ambitious-future-growth-plan.aspx

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Master plan 2012

Our current master plan was published in 2012 and will be replaced in 2019, once our draft master plan is finalised.

Gatwick master plan 2012
Gatwick master plan appendices 2012


The consultation:

Consultation will run from 18 October 2018 to 5pm on 10 January 2019

Details at 

https://surveys.ipsosinteractive.com/mrIWeb/mrIWeb.dll


If the proposals are carried out, the runway will be extended by 12 metres and used to allow an additional 10-15 short-haul flights to take off every hour.

The plans state that a terminal expansion, construction of an additional aircraft pier of landing gates and work on roads around the airport could also be carried out to accommodate the extra passengers.

Friends of the Earth campaigner Oliver Hayes criticised the plans as “expansion by the back door”, arguing that they would have “huge” detrimental impacts on biodiversity and air quality.

“The challenge of preventing dangerous climate chaos means that further expansion of any airport, anywhere, can’t be up for consideration,” Hayes said.

“We can’t be serious about stopping catastrophic climate change on the one hand and send aviation emissions soaring on the other. The environmental case for expanding airport capacity is non-existent and increasing airport capacity, which obviously means more flights, is totally at odds with the policy direction needed to meet the unfolding climate crisis.”


The AEF (Aviation Environment Federation) commented:

Using ‘emergency’ runway routinely would increase capacity to 68-70 million passengers (from 43million in 2016), and cater for up to 390,000 flights annually (compared to 290,000 in 2016). Capacity with just one runway estimated to be 61million, 17% more than DfT estimate

Growth on this scale isn’t factored into the Government’s aviation CO2 forecasts and will increase the UK’s total aviation emissions – which are already estimated to exceed the max level advised by @theCCCuk to meet climate obligations by 2050 – by a further million tonnes p.a.!

 


The Draft Gatwick Master Plan says

https://www.gatwickairport.com/globalassets/business–community/growing-gatwick/gatwick-draft-master-plan-final.pdf

A higher level of growth would be possible if we bring the existing standby runway into regular use (for departing flights only). The standby runway is currently used only when the main runway is temporarily closed. Our 1979 Section 52 Agreement2 with West Sussex County Council precludes the simultaneous use of both runways. This agreement expires in 2019. By operating both runways simultaneously, we would be able to add between 10 and 15 additional hourly aircraft movements in the peak hours, which could deliver up to 70 million passengers by 2032. The airfield would need some reconfiguration and some additional support infrastructure would be required. However we expect to keep the airport development within the airport’s existing footprint and the airport would remain a two terminal operation. Initial indications are that aircraft noise generated by this scheme would be broadly similar to today’s level.

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See also

 

Gatwick’s subterfuge with its emergency runway – or a 2nd runway, by any other name. Comment by GACC

In response to Gatwick airport announcing they plan to use their emergency runway, as a 2nd runway, local campaign, Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) Chairman, Peter Barclay, said, “We strongly oppose any 2nd runway at Gatwick and it will fight this proposal tooth and nail.” The Emergency Runway is located parallel to and only approximately 190m north of the main runway. Planning permission for the emergency runway was granted solely on the basis that – under no circumstances – could it be used in conjunction with the main runway. The CAA permission is that only one runway can be used at a time, and the emergency runway can only be used if the main runway is out of action. New planning consent (DCO) from Crawley council would be needed for the change of use, and also consent from the CAA and other safety bodies. Peter said: “The proposal, which may bring in excess of 80,000 additional flights a year, will simply increase the problems already being experienced by local communities – noise, air pollution and excessive road traffic. It would also put even greater pressure on the tottering road and rail infrastructure both locally and further afield. … Gatwick is attempting to get a 2nd runway via the back door, as it were.”

Click here to view full story…

Read more »

Teddington TAG shows London Assembly data proves Heathrow NOx travels far, far away from the airport (not just Grayling’s “2km”)

The Airports Commission had, as its study area for the effects of Heathrow expansion, an area of just 2 kilometres from the boundary of the expanded airport. Chris Grayling wrote to the Chair of the Transport Committee on the 23rd February 2018 saying that this area “captures over 98% of additional emissions that could occur from expansion”. Teddington TAG asks if this figure of 98% emissions captured within 2 km of the boundary is true. They located air pollution data from the London Assembly, available by Borough. It apportions how much of the NOx in different areas is from vehicles, aviation and other sources. This shows that in Richmond Old Deer Park, according to the Data Apportionment Tool, about 77% of the NOx is from aviation. In Kew / North Sheen, 11km from touch-down, about 57% is from aviation.  At Putney, which is under the flight path but is over 15 km from touch-down at Heathrow, about 33% of the NOx is from aviation. Putney is worse off than Kew as total emissions are greater. And all that is just from 2 runways! Aviation apportionment readings stretch back to Clapham Junction and beyond. So why did Grayling tell the Transport Committee that 98% was within 2km.  Ignorance of the facts? Failure to be properly informed?
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WILL HEALTH EFFECTS FROM EMISSIONS FROM HEATHROW EXPANSION BE FELT JUST WITHIN 2 KILOMETRES?

13TH OCTOBER 2018  (From Teddington Action Group)

The Airports Commission had as its study area, for the effects of Heathrow expansion, an area of just 2 kilometres from the boundary of the expanded airport. Chris Grayling wrote to the chair person of the Transport Committee on the 23rd February 2018 letter here  saying that:  “The DfT’s approach assessed the health impacts on populations living within 2km of the expanded airport using updated relationships between pollutant concentrations and mortality, published by DEFRA …………..The study area, which captures over 98% of additional emissions that could occur from expansion, was determined by the Airports Commission’s consultants to include those locations where expansion was expected to make a significant contribution to ambient pollution levels”
Is this figure of 98% emissions capture within 2 km of the boundary true or false?
Well; the London Assembly have collated a lot of air quality data, which has been in the public domain for some years. King’s College London have been instrumental in collating much air quality data. The data is available by Borough and as an “apportionment tool” to tell us the relevant sources (including aviation) of pollution at any spot in the greater London area. The website is athttps://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/llaqm-bespoke-borough-by-borough-air-quality-modelling-and-data?resource=e770d524-dd30-46db-bc2e-e8c4da8902a4Go into Richmond Old Deer Park and you might think that the majority of NOx there is from nasty smelly diesel lorries roaring down the A316 to the M3. You would be wrong. According to the Data Apportionment Tool, no less than 77.7% of NOx in Richmond Old Deer Park by the side of the A316 comes from aviation. So; let’s go a bit further away from Heathrow and see what happens:

Let us go to Kew / North Sheen, 11km from touch-down and look forward to 2020:

Put the co-ordinates into the tool and:

We are shown that 57.7% of NOx comes from aviation. There is a pie chart too:

The legal limit is an annual mean of 40 micrograms per cubic metre. There is a NOx map:

and a map of NO2 only

which show that in 2020 there will be areas particularly close to the roads that will breach the legal limits. That is with two runways at Heathrow and 57% of the NOx coming from aviation.

 

Let us go further away to Putney, which is under the flight path but is over 15 kilometres from touch-down at Heathrow:

Put in the co-ordinates to the calculation tool and:

 

We find that aviation is still contributing to 33% of the NOx emissions. Putney is worse off than Kew though because total emissions are greater and therefore the breaches are more severe. The total emissions, of which aviation contributes 33%, is bigger. The NO2 map is:

and the NOx map is:

 

Heathrow itself is way over the permitted limits and is predicted to be so in 2020 and 2030.

The 2020 map:

and the 2030 map is only a little better:

And all that is just from two runways!

Aviation apportionment readings stretch back to Clapham Junction and beyond

So Mr Grayling: why are you telling us and the Transport Committee that 98% of emissions from an expanded Heathrow would be captured within 2 kilometres of the airport boundary?

http://www.teddingtonactiongroup.com/2018/10/13/will-health-effects-from-emissions-from-heathrow-expansion-be-felt-just-within-2-kilometres/

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The misleading Grayling letter

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/transport/Letter-from-Chris-Grayling-MP-to-Committee-Chair-re-Airports-NPS-revised-draft-23-2-2018.pdf

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See also earlier:

Grayling emissions omission admission: Heathrow air quality costs 2-4 times higher than previously thought

The Commons Transport Committee is currently assessing the Heathrow proposals for a 3rd runway. One of the issues in which they have taken a particular interest is whether the right numbers have been used for the cost to human health of air pollution, and if the costs of pollution beyond a 2km band around the airport have been properly considered. Chris Grayling, Transport Secretary, has now written to the Committee to clarify the government position, and has confirmed that the DfT omitted (in error) to consider the emissions beyond 2km. By contrast the DfT’s own impact appraisal had noted impacts well beyond this 2km boundary, in terms of additional vehicle traffic.  The total figure for the extra cost to health, from Grayling’s admission, is now thought to be 2 to 4 times higher than the one published in the official appraisal document.  That means the “net present value” of the scheme, previously assessed as minus £-2.2 to plus £3.3 billion over 60 years (so already potentially negative) could drop to as low as minus £-2.6 to plus £2.9 billion under the new estimate.  The cost of the damage to human health from additional air pollution, associated with a new runway, is one of the two ways the DfT assesses the cost-benefit analysis of the proposal.   

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2018/03/grayling-emissions-omission-admission-heathrow-air-quality-costs-2-4-times-higher-than-previously-thought/
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Heathrow electric plane greenwash – tiny subsidy for one plane …years ahead ….

Heathrow has made its latest greenwashing attempt. This time it is saying it is to let the first electric hybrid plane have a year’s free landing slots, when in regular service. This is  – quote  -“designed to encourage airlines to pursue clean growth and deploy their cleanest, quietest aircraft at Heathrow.” This is part of the oxymoron, “clean growth” which business is aiming for. (Clean – totally abused word with aviation sector – is probably meant to mean lower carbon, in this context.) So far there is – wait for it – a plane that can carry 2 passengers …. Heathrow is telling the government etc that it is helping to “drive sustainable change across the industry.”  The aviation industry hopes there might be electric aircraft carrying passengers by 2030 (so the Heathrow offer is not exactly imminent …) Here is a Heathrow quote, showing just how much carbon greenwash this is:  “With global air passengers expected to double by 2035, these changes will play a critical role in driving a sustainable future for the aviation sector and will support goals outlined in Heathrow’s own sustainability strategy – Heathrow 2.0.”  Aviation Minister, Liz Sugg, said: “Our Aviation Strategy [consultation soon] will also consider further ways to support the development of cleaner, greener technology in the sector.”

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[Extreme greenwash below – read with great scepticism, and all critical faculties working….]

Heathrow offers free landing charges for a year to UK’s first electric plane

  • Heathrow to start the clock ticking on the UK’s first electric commercial flight, announcing the aircraft will be able to touch down at the UK’s hub free of charge for a year – a prize worth nearly £1million
  • Speaking at the BusinessGreen Summit, CEO John Holland-Kaye will open the incentive to all airlines operating at Heathrow both now and in the future
  • The grand innovation prize is the latest in a suite of measures designed to encourage airlines to pursue clean growth and deploy their cleanest, quietest aircraft at Heathrow
  • The announcement coincides with Green GB Week, celebrating the UK’s world-leading role in delivering clean growth

In a world airport first, Heathrow has announced that the first electric-hybrid aircraft will not have to pay Heathrow’s landing charges for an entire year when it is put into regular service at the UK’s international hub. In celebration of Green GB Week and inspired by the first flight short electric-powered flight carrying two passengers at Oslo Airport earlier this year, Heathrow is looking to leverage its role as one of the world’s leading airports to drive sustainable change across the industry.

At the BusinessGreen Leaders’ Summit in London today, Heathrow’s Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye will launch a grand innovation incentive, valued at nearly £1 million.

There are already more than 100 electric aircraft projects underway across the world and current industry thinking suggests electric aircraft could touch down at major international airports by 2030. Innovators are facing two main hurdles though – the cost of development and current demand.

This prize has been designed to incentivise airlines to invest in electric technology, helping to increase demand and speed up the arrival of zero-emissions flights at the UK’s biggest airport.Electric aircraft could be much quieter, cleaner and more efficient than today’s fleet. With global air passengers expected to double by 2035, these changes will play a critical role in driving a sustainable future for the aviation sector and will support goals outlined in Heathrow’s own sustainability strategy – Heathrow 2.0.

The airport currently incentivises airlines to bring their greenest fleet to Heathrow through the use of environmental charges, and will continue to work with airlines to develop these incentives in the future.

The prize comes alongside Heathrow’s existing plans to decarbonize the industry and pursue clean growth, including the quarterly “Fly Quiet and Green” league table which tracks airline performance on noise and emissions targets, and a partnership with Virgin Atlantic and LanzaTech to further the take-up of more sustainable biofuels.

Heathrow Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye, said:“Heathrow has long been a leader in sustainable aviation.  We championed carbon neutral growth in global aviation, which will come into effect in 2020.  The next frontier is zero carbon flying, and I hope this prize will help to make it a reality at Heathrow by 2030.”

Airbus Chief Technology Officer Grazia Vittadini, said:“With air traffic projected to double every 15 years, it is our duty as an industry to find solutions that ensure sustainable growth with minimal environmental impact. At Airbus, this is our driving force for developing electric and hybrid-electric propulsion technologies. We commend Heathrow Airport’s initiative to jump-start the adoption of hybrid-electric technologies with the launch of the Grand Innovation Prize!”

CEO of easyJet Johan Lundgren, commented: “With Heathrow’s announcement today, it is clear they share easyJet’s ambition for a more sustainable aviation industry. We support airports who are encouraging airlines to operate the most sustainable aircraft and welcome this initiative from Heathrow Airport. We already operate the newest generation Airbus Neo aircraft and are partnering with US firm Wright Electric who has the ambitious target of designing an all electric commercial aircraft in the next decade. We firmly believe it is not if, but when, electric commercial aircraft become a reality.”

Aviation Minister, Liz Sugg, said: “The Government is committed to cutting carbon emissions and promoting new environmentally-friendly fuels in transport, including in the aviation industry. Heathrow’s initiative is an innovative programme which will encourage airlines to invest in electric-hybrid aircraft. Our Aviation Strategy will also consider further ways to support the development of cleaner, greener technology in the sector.”

This news follows a commitment made earlier this month to restore UK peatlands. This pilot project will help to offset the airport’s own carbon emissions as part of Heathrow 2.0. Working with the Lancashire Wildlife Trust and DEFRA, Heathrow’s first restoration priority will be Little Woolden Moss, part of Chat Moss which is a larger area of peat bog land, west of Manchester. With all of Heathrow’s terminals running on 100% renewable electricity since April 2017 and ongoing upgrades to electrify the airport’s own vehicles, Heathrow is already nearly 60% towards its zero-carbon goal for airport infrastructure.

In the next few months, Heathrow will be publishing its carbon neutral growth roadmap, setting out how the airport can deliver its aspiration for growth from a third runway to be carbon neutral.  Heathrow is already working towards operating carbon neutral airport infrastructure by 2020, a key step towards being zero carbon by 2050, and is also reducing carbon in its supply chain.
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NOTES TO EDITORS:

Prize calculation

Based on the current structure of landing charges, the incentive would be worth up to almost £1million. This calculation is based on the annualised value of a slot with three landings a day, operated by a Chapter 14 Low aircraft (A320). The eventual value of this slot would be dependent on future landing charges which are agreed in consultation with airlines.

About Heathrow Airport and Heathrow 2.0Heathrow is Europe’s largest airport and one of the world’s top international aviation hubs. As the UK’s global gateway, Heathrow welcomes more than 78 million passengers every year with a commitment to making ‘every journey better’, and in 2017, handled over 1.7m tonnes of cargo as the nation’s biggest port by value for markets outside the EU and Switzerland.

The airport is home to more than 80 airlines and helps to drive British trade growth by connecting the nation to more than 200 destinations around the world. Following an investment of more than £11 billion over the last 10 years, Heathrow is currently ranked by passengers as the ‘Best Airport in Western Europe’ for the fourth year running and the ‘Best Airport for Shopping’ for nine years in a row. Heathrow 2.0, the airport’s sustainability strategy can be accessed here: http://your.heathrow.com/sustainability/http://mediacentre.heathrow.com/pressrelease/details/81/Corporate-operational-24/10194

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October 16, 2018 (Travel Mole)

Heathrow to waive landing fees for first electric aircraft

Test flight of Pipistrel Alpha Electro

Heathrow is planning to waive landing fees for a year for the first electric aircraft to go into scheduled service as part of its plan to become a world hub for greener jets following the opening of its proposed third runway.

The deal, which The Times claimed was worth about £1 million, will be followed by other incentives to airlines in the future, said the airport.

Both Airbus and Boeing, as well as smaller aircraft manufacturers, are competing to develop entirely electric or hybrid planes, with the hope of putting the first into full service by the middle of the next decade.

Slovenian manufacturer Pipistrel flew a pure electric two-seater jet over Oslo airport in the summer, which was the first trial of its kind.  The company is now working on a larger, four-seater electric hybrid.

At the same time, Heathrow is keen to show that it has real pans to cut noise and emissions in order to get the final go-ahead for its controversial third runway, which is the subject of a planning consolation.

EasyJet is working the US manufacturer Wright Electric to develop an electric jet, which is expected to join its fleet within the next 10 years. The airline is hoping this will replace conventional aircraft on short flights of up to 335 miles.

https://www.travelmole.com/news_feature.php?news_id=2034455&c=setreg&region=2

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Heathrow will waive fees to lure quiet electric jets

Heathrow will attempt to position itself as a world hub for electric aircraft as part of its plan to cut noise and emissions when a third runway is built.

Airlines are to be given financial incentives to encourage the use of pure electric and hybrid electric planes at the west London hub, which is Europe’s busiest airport.

The initial commitment is to waive landing fees for a year on the first electric aircraft to be brought into regular service at the airport, in a deal believed to be worth about £1 million. Heathrow says that it will also work with airlines to develop further incentives in the future.

Airlines are competing to adopt electric planes, which will be cleaner and quieter than existing jet fuel-powered aircraft.

Major manufacturers including Airbus and Boeing, as well as a series of smaller start-ups, are attempting to develop electric or hybrid electric planes and it is claimed that they could provide a full passenger service by the middle of the next decade.

In the summer, a pure electric two-seater aircraft manufactured by the Slovenian company Pipistrel flew over Oslo airport as part of the first trial of its kind. The company plans to put a larger four-seater electric hybrid plane into the skies next year.

Easyjet, Britain’s busiest airline, has signed a deal with the American manufacturer Wright Electric with a view to developing an electric jet for its fleet by 2027. It said that the aircraft could replace conventional jets on every journey of up to 335 miles, including routes from London to Edinburgh, within 20 years.

It is believed that hybrid electric planes will be much more viable than purely electric aircraft in the short term. Hybrids are likely to use battery power during take-off and landing and revert to aviation fuel for cruising during longer flights.

The launch of the landing-charge waiver coincides with the continuing development of Heathrow’s plans for a third runway, which the airport hopes will become operational by 2026. The proposals are due to face a public consultation next year.

Clearance for take-off

Wright Electric US company backed by Harvard University is working to develop a full passenger aircraft. A mocked-up electric Easyjet plane was shown last year with propulsion systems distributed along the wing instead of large engines, a battery that can be easily swapped and long, thin wings to reduce drag.

Boeing The company is backing a project by Zunum Aero to develop hybrid electric passenger planes with batteries that can be recharged by the jet engine. It said that the aircraft could be put into service in the next decade, with a battery range of 175 miles that can be extended by up to five times that by the jet-fuel generator.

Airbus Unveiled plans in the summer for a 2 megawatt hybrid electric propulsion system, the E-Fan X, alongside Siemens and Rolls-Royce.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/heathrow-will-waive-fees-to-lure-quiet-electric-jets-dwrlh2dpn

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From the Independent, 16th October 2018 :

….the challenge is to create planes that are big enough and have sufficient range to compete with conventional aircraft.

Some of Heathrow’s busiest routes are at the initial target range for commercial electric aircraft: Amsterdam (231 miles), Dublin (280 miles) and Edinburgh (331 miles).

Dozens of projects are seeking to make electric aircraft commercially feasible.

Britain’s biggest budget airline, easyJet, has teamed up with a US firm, Wright Electric, to develop a 150-seat plane capable of flying up to 300 miles. The airline plans to fly from Heathrow when a third runway is built.

The chief executive of easyJet, Johan Lundgren, said: “We support airports who are encouraging airlines to operate the most sustainable aircraft and welcome this initiative from Heathrow Airport.

“We firmly believe it is not if, but when, electric commercial aircraft become a reality.”

The key issue for designers is energy density, which is far higher for jet fuel than for even the most advanced batteries.

Initially many developers are focusing, like Heathrow, on aircraft which combine electric and conventional gas-turbine power.

Using electricity during take-off, when jet engines are noisiest and thirstiest, could dramatically reduce both fuel consumption and noise.

A British Aerospace 146 commuter aircraft is being adapted to carry two tons of batteries and the world’s most powerful flying generator. One of its four engines will run on electricity.

Earlier this year, Norway’s airport operator, Avinor, https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/norway-short-haul-flights-electric-deadline-no-fossil-fuels-climate-change-a8165526.html pledged to switch to electric air transport for flights of up to 90 minutes by 2040.

A leading US start-up, Zunum Air of Seattle, says: “Our aircraft are ‘hybrid-to-electrics’ that sip fuel only when they have to, will use even less over time as batteries upgrade, and will one day go completely without.”

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/electric-plane-heathrow-airport-airbus-easyjet-rolls-royce-zunum-a8585741.html

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New station among big plans for Leeds Bradford airport

The public will have their say on proposals to improve transport connectivity to Leeds Bradford Airport, including plans for a new railway station nearby. Senior councillors on Leeds City Council’s executive board have agreed a recommendation to carry out public consultation and engagement on proposals to improve road and rail access to the airport to support its future growth, as well as job creation in the area and addressing current congestion issues in north west Leeds.  The council working with West Yorkshire Combined Authority, Leeds Bradford Airport and key stakeholders has put forward key investment proposals for a new airport parkway rail station, located on the existing Leeds-Harrogate Line, with a short connecting spur road to the airport to provide a shuttle bus connection similar to that at Luton Airport. This would also serve as a park and ride service for destinations on the Leeds-Harrogate Line and beyond. Also improving road access through one of three options. And releasing 36 hectares of land next to the airport for employment growth and job creation in north west Leeds. All of the key details on the proposals to be considered together will be available in the consultation, to take place early in 2019.
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New station among big plans for Leeds Bradford airport

25th September 2018  (York Press)

THE public will have their say on proposals to improve transport connectivity to Leeds Bradford Airport, including plans for a new railway station nearby.

Senior councillors on Leeds City Council’s executive board have agreed a recommendation to carry out public consultation and engagement on proposals to improve road and rail access to the airport to support its future growth, as well as job creation in the area and addressing current congestion issues in north west Leeds.

Leeds Bradford Airport is one of the fastest-growing airports in the UK, with passenger numbers predicted by the Department for Transport to rise from four million in 2017 to 7.1million by 2030 and more than nine million by 2050.

To support this expected growth at the airport and to support job creation in the wider north west Leeds, the council working with West Yorkshire Combined Authority, Leeds Bradford Airport and key stakeholders has put forward the following key investment proposals:

– A new airport parkway rail station, located on the existing Leeds-Harrogate Line, with a short connecting spur road to the airport to provide a shuttle bus connection similar to that at Luton Airport. This would also serve as a park and ride service for destinations on the Leeds-Harrogate Line and beyond

– Improving road access through one of three options, building a new LBA Link Route a) From the A65 running along the eastern side of the airport before joining the A658; b) From the A65 running to the south west of the airport before joining the A658; or c) Upgrading existing junctions on the A65 and A658 in Rawdon and Yeadon along with localised road widening

– Releasing 36 hectares of land next to the airport for employment growth and job creation in north west Leeds

The three LBA Link Route road proposals, which were shortlisted following an analysis of a range of possible options, were first announced at the end of 2015. An initial public consultation on them resulted in feedback which focused on calls for improved rail access to the airport rather than road improvements.

Leeds City Council said improving rail access to the airport has long been an ambition, but the location of Leeds Bradford Airport and its topography meant any direct rail connection would be very difficult to achieve and would be prohibitively expensive.

The potential for a parkway station nearby to serve the airport by rail and both Leeds and Harrogate has now come about as part of the Connecting Leeds transport strategy, with the city receiving funding of £173.5m from the government to invest in transport network improvements.

Offering rail connectivity to the airport does not, however, remove the need for better road access, the council added.

Leeds City Council executive member for regeneration, transport and planning, councillor Richard Lewis, said: “The latest figures from regional airports including Manchester show that 84 per cent of passengers travel to the airport by car or taxi despite there being direct rail links. Therefore, as Leeds Bradford Airport continues to grow, it is vital that we look at ways to alleviate increased traffic on the road network in north west Leeds as well as plans for a rail connection.”

All of the key details on the proposals to be considered together will be available in the consultation, to take place early in 2019.

https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/16901803.new-station-among-big-plans-for-leeds-bradford-airport/

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Stansted Airport expansion decision delayed again, (from 17th October) – no date set

Plans to expand Stansted have been grounded, for now. Uttlesford District Council (UDC) has postponed a meeting to determine the future of the plans, under pressure from expansion opposition. The airport wants to increase the annual passenger limit by 8 million, from 35 million now up to 43 million. Expansion plans include work to build new aircraft stands and taxiways for additional aircraft (not a runway). The meeting was originally due to be held in July, before being pushed back until October 17th. A rearranged date has yet to be set. Expansion opposition group Stop Stansted Expansion (SSE) successfully requested the latest delay so that technical issues can be discussed. Highways England also complicated matters with concerns about road traffic implications.  SSE said it is important that approval is not given before all the implications have been properly considered.  They say it is “astonishing” that UDC were preparing to approve the expansion “even when important issues were – and still are – unresolved.” UDC said:“As a consequence of accommodating this request, officers expect to need extra time to address any technical issues that may arise from these enhanced consultation arrangements”.
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Stansted Airport expansion decision delayed again

8 OCTOBER, 2018

BY CONNOR IBBETSON  (New Civil Engineer)

Plans to expand London Stansted Airport have been grounded, for now.

Uttlesford District Council (UDC) has postponed a meeting to determine the future of plans to expand London’s Stansted Airport under pressure from expansion opposition activists.

Stansted Airport owner, Manchester Airports Group (MAG), is awaiting a decision on its application to increase the airport’s passenger limit by 8M. Currently Stansted handles 35M passengers a year, MAG hopes to increase that to 43M.

Expansion plans include work to build new aircraft stands and taxiways for additional aircraft.

The meeting was originally due to be held in July, before being pushed back until October 17. A rearranged date has yet to be set.

Expansion opposition group Stop Stansted Expansion (SSE) successfully requested the latest delay so that technical issues can be discussed.

Highways England also complicated matters with concerns about road traffic implications.

SSE chairman Peter Sanders said: “UDC has been intent on rushing through approval of this application from the very beginning and here we have yet another example of its officers intending to jump the gun with a recommendation to approve the application before the process of considering its implications has been completed.

“To anyone who has followed UDC’s handling of this airport planning application from the outset, it will come as no surprise that officers would be recommending approval.

“It is, however, astonishing that they were preparing to do so even when important issues were – and still are – unresolved.”

A spokesperson from UDC said: “Uttlesford District Council’s Planning Committee was due to determine the planning application – which seeks to raise the current cap on the number of passengers the airport is permitted to serve from 35 million passengers per annum (mppa) to 43mppa – at a special meeting on 17 October.

“However, the date of the committee meeting is being pushed back following a request from Stop Stansted Expansion to be allowed sufficient time to address Planning Committee members at one of the forthcoming additional public speaking sessions.

“As a consequence of accommodating this request, officers expect to need extra time to address any technical issues that may arise from these enhanced consultation arrangements”.

“In addition, the council will offer the applicant the opportunity to address the points raised during this consultation period”.

https://www.newcivilengineer.com/latest/stansted-airport-expansion-decision-delayed-again/10035860.article

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See earlier:

Date set for Stansted Airport expansion planning decision by Uttlesford – 17th October

The passenger limit at Stansted could be lifted from 35 million a year to 43 million. Now the date of the special planning committee hearing at Uttlesford District Council, (UDC) to decide a planning application that would mean potentially millions more people going through Stansted, has been announced. UDC said the special planning committee is will be on October 17th, following 3 public speaking sessions the week before the decision will be made.  The decision on whether to allow the airport to increase its annual passenger numbers was due to be decided in July, but because of the lack of information on sections of the application the meeting was delayed.  There has been staunch opposition from residents fighting to stop any increase in passenger numbers. In August, Stop Stansted Expansion (SSE) filed legal papers to try and force the government to make the decision on the application, saying that UDC didn’t have the experience or expertise to handle such a complicated application.  Currently the airport is operating with around 27 million passengers per year, eight million fewer than its current passenger limit. SSE will continue  with legal action to make central government decide the plans, irrespective of the decision taken by UDC’s planning committee.

Click here to view full story…

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The 5 legal challenges against a 3rd Heathrow runway will be heard over 2 weeks in March 2019

Five legal challenges against the Government’s plans to expand Heathrow have reached the next legal hurdle and will proceed to a full judicial review in March 2019. Justice Holgate today (October 4th) confirmed, in a hearing at the High Court, that the cases lodged by five different parties would be heard over 10 days in March 2019.  Due to the size of the cases, amount of paperwork involved, and the public interest in the case, the hearings in March will be heard by two judges and will be heard in the largest courtroom at the Royal Courts of Justice. It was also noted that a separate courtroom may have to be used as overspill, with a TV link to the main proceedings, also due to level of interest. Paul McGuinness, Chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said: “These legal challenges are of the Government’s own making. It is not insignificant that the judge has permitted all five claimants to proceed to judicial review. In addition to the claim from several councils and the London Mayor, the four other claims raise some serious points of law. If the government had not ignored available evidence in their blinkered enthusiasm to expand this already highly disruptive airport, parliament would not have supported the proposal, and these actions would not have been necessary.”
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Heathrow legal challenges reach next hurdle

4.10.2018   (No 3rd Runway Coalition)

Five legal challenges against the Government’s plans to expand Heathrow have reached the next legal hurdle and will proceed to a full judicial review in March 2019.

Justice Holgate today (October 4th) confirmed, in a hearing at the High Court, that the cases lodged by five different parties would be heard over 10 days in March 2019

The five parties are:

– A consortium of local authorities (Hillingdon, Hammersmith & Fulham, Richmond, Wandsworth and Windsor & Maidenhead), Greenpeace and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan.
– Heathrow Hub Limited (promoters of a rival scheme to expand Heathrow
– Friends of the Earth
– Plan B, an environmental justice organisation
– Neil Spurrier – a resident of Twickenham, Middlesex

Due to the size of the cases, amount of paperwork involved, and the public interest in the case, the hearings in March will be heard by two judges and will be heard in the largest courtroom at the Royal Courts of Justice. It was also noted that a separate courtroom may have to be used as overspill, with a TV link to the main proceedings, also due to level of interest.

Paul McGuinness, Chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said:

“These legal challenges are of the Government’s own making. It is not insignificant that the judge has permitted all five claimants to proceed to judicial review. In addition to the claim from several councils and the London Mayor, the four other claims raise some serious points of law.

“If the government had not ignored available evidence in their blinkered enthusiasm to expand this already highly disruptive airport, parliament would not have supported the proposal, and these actions would not have been necessary.”

John McDonnell MP, who addressed opponents of Heathrow expansion, gathered in solidarity outside the High Court, said:

“The third runway project is increasingly recognised as a non-runner. The Government needs to listen this time and time again and stop wasting taxpayers’ money in another failing Grayling project.

“A Government that prevents Heathrow going ahead will send a message that we are serious about climate change, serious about creating a zero-carbon economy and the development of our transport network will not be concentrated in one part of the country.”


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Video and some photos from outside the Royal Courts of Justice today, before the hearing to ascertain details about the 5 legal challenges against a 3rd Heathrow runway. The main hearings will be over 10 days (might be more?) in March 2019.

Video – lively chanting of “No 3rd Runway”

https://twitter.com/NoR3Coalition/status/1047775423617294336.

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HEATHROW THIRD RUNWAY OBJECTORS TAKE CASE TO HIGH COURT

‘The negative environmental impact of this highly disruptive airport should not be allowed to grow,’ said Paul McGuinness, chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition

In June, MPs rubber-stamped plans for a third runway at Europe’s busiest airport, which Heathrow says will cost £14bn and open in 2026.

The option was unanimously recommended by the Davies Commission in 2015. The three-year study chose it over proposals for an extended northern runway at Heathrow and a second runway at Gatwick.

But the project faces its first legal test as a coalition of groups opposed to expansion begin a challenge in the High Court.

The Mayor of London, five local authorities and environmental campaigners say there are many unanswered questions about the wider environmental impact.

They are joined by proponents of Heathrow Hub, the extended runway option, who claim that the decision process which led to the National Policy Statement was flawed.

The High Court will decide which of the legal challenges has sufficient grounds to proceed to a full judicial review.

Paul McGuinness, chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said: “The negative environmental impact of this highly disruptive airport should not be allowed to grow.

Third way? Protesters against expansion of Heathrow outside the High Court in London (Simon Calder)

“Having ignored evidence, such as the report of parliament’s Transport Select Committee, the decision to expand Heathrow was always going to end up in the courts, under judicial review.

“We are delighted that the process has now started.”

The court will give directions as to how claims should proceed, and a main hearing is expected to open in March 2019.

The defendant in the legal action is the Department for Transport (DfT), which is backing the third runway option.

A DfT spokesperson said: “Expansion at Heathrow is a critical programme which will provide a boost to the economy, increase our international links and create tens of thousands of new jobs.

“As with any major infrastructure project, we have been anticipating legal challenges and will robustly defend our position.

“Today’s hearing does not impact on the work Heathrow is undertaking on its application for planning consent or the timetable to deliver this much-needed runway.”

A Heathrow spokesperson said: “We are participating in the legal challenges as an interested party given our role as the promoter of this critically important, national project.

“Our work in delivering Britain’s new runway will continue in tandem with this process, following overwhelming support in Parliament.

“We remain focused on the work needed for our development consent order submission in 2020 and we are getting on with the delivery of this project which will benefit the whole of the UK.”

Under a judicial review, the court cannot directly block the new runway from being built. But a judge could strike out parts of the government’s plan or order the policy to be reviewed.

On the day the Davies Commission reported, 1 July 2015, Boris Johnson, then Mayor of London, said a third runway would never be built.

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/heathrow-airport-third-runway-latest-news-high-court-objection-a8567841.html

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Blow for Heathrow airport expansion as campaigners win legal fight over third runway

Protesters gathered this morning outside the Royal Courts of Justice, where five separate claims opposing the third runway were heardKIRSTY O’CONNOR/PA 

Plans for a third runway faced a setback today as a series of legal challenges against the project cleared a major hurdle.

The High Court in London gave permission for five separate claims against the runway to proceed to a full judicial review. The cases will be heard by two judges over a fortnight in March next year.

Critics said that the decision represented a huge blow to the project as it indicated that all five claims had merit.

Judges could ultimately render the plans unlawful in their present form, forcing the government into a costly rewrite that would almost certainly delay the project.

The claims have been brought against the government’s airports national policy statement (NPS) — the legislation that effectively gives Heathrow outline planning consent.

It was unanimously passed by MPs in a commons vote this summer. Support from Labour MPs helped to push through the proposals to expand Europe’s busiest airport with an overwhelming majority of 296.

Chris Grayling, the transport secretary, said that the new runway would set a “clear path to our future as a global nation in the post-Brexit world”.

However, legal challenges lodged with the High Court claim that it fails to properly deal with the impact on air quality, climate change, noise and congestion.

Paul McGuinness, chairman of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said: “These legal challenges are of the government’s own making. It is not insignificant that the judge has permitted all five claimants to proceed to judicial review.

“If the government had not ignored available evidence in their blinkered enthusiasm to expand this already highly disruptive airport, parliament would not have supported the proposal, and these actions would not have been necessary.”

John Stewart, chairman of the anti-Heathrow campaign group Hacan, said: “This is a blow to the government. At best it probably thought it would just need to defend two or three of the challenges. Now it faces all five.”

The most high-profile case is being brought by a cross-party coalition of five local councils close to the west London airport along with Greenpeace and Sadiq Khan, the London mayor.

Mr Khan said that the legislation failed to properly deal with the threat of “hundreds of thousands of people being blighted by intolerable noise levels and worsening air quality in an area where pollution is already well above legal levels”.

A second legal challenge has been brought by Friends of the Earth and another is from Plan B, the environmental justice group. A further challenge is from Heathrow Hub, the promoters of a rival plan to expand the airport, and a fifth is from Neil Spurrier, a resident from Twickenham. A sixth, from another individual resident, was dropped today.

The court will hear the judicial review over ten days in March and pass down its judgment about a month later. It could render the NPS unlawful and force the government to make major changes to the legislation.

This would inevitably delay Heathrow’s own planning process, although this was denied by the airport itself.

At present Heathrow is due to publish detailed proposals for a third runway next summer before a formal planning application is lodged in 2020. It hopes to start work on the new two-mile runway in 2021 with flights taking off from late 2025 or early 2026.

A Heathrow spokeswoman said: “We are participating in the legal challenges as an interested party given our role as the promoter of this critically important national project.

“Our work in delivering Britain’s new runway will continue in tandem with this process, following overwhelming support in parliament. We remain focussed on the work needed for our development consent order submission in 2020 and we are getting on with the delivery of this project, which will benefit the whole of the UK.”

A Department for Transport spokeswoman said: “Expansion at Heathrow is a critical programme which will provide a boost to the economy, increase our international links and create tens of thousands of new jobs.

“As with any major infrastructure project, we have been anticipating legal challenges and will robustly defend our position.

“Today’s hearing does not impact on the work Heathrow is undertaking on its application for planning consent or the timetable to deliver this much-needed runway.”

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/blow-for-heathrow-airport-expansion-as-campaigners-win-legal-fight-over-runway-23l9jxqjz

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ALSO   Daily Mail Online

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-6239165/Heathrow-expansion-protesters-gather-outside-High-Court-hearing.html?ito=amp_twitter_share-top

and

http://www.itv.com/news/2018-10-04/legal-battle-against-heathrow-expansion-plans-reaches-high-court/

https://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/coalition-campaigners-launch-legal-action-15234121

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http://talkradio.co.uk/news/legal-battle-against-heathrow-expansion-plans-reaches-high-court-18100428208#rxWPjzgJsjMzyr97.99

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Worth noting is this excellent tweet from SERA, the Labour environment campaign, who have quite a lot of Labour MP members

https://twitter.com/serauk/status/1047781450311974912 .

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Legal proceedings against Heathrow expansion begin – groups against the 3rd runway welcome “decisive action”

Plans for Heathrow expansion will meet their first legal test on Thursday 4th October, as claimants against the proposals seek to proceed their cases to full judicial review.  Five parties have lodged judicial review claims against the plans including a consortium of 5 local authorities with Greenpeace and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan. Also Heathrow Hub Limited (promoters of a rival scheme to expand Heathrow), and Friends of the Earth. Also Plan B and a Twickenham resident, Neil Spurrier. The claims are against the Government’s National Policy Statement (NPS) – which only included Heathrow expansion – which Parliament voted on in June 2018, despite many unanswered questions about the projects legality and wider environmental impact.  Paul McGuinness, Chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said: “Having ignored evidence, such as the report of parliament’s Transport Select Committee, the decision to expand Heathrow was always going to end up in the courts, under judicial review …”  Government lawyers have conceded that all applicants are likely to get permission to proceed with their applications for JR, they are unlikely to oppose the granting of permissions at this pre-trial hearing.

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Legal proceedings against Heathrow expansion begin

COALITION OF ANTI-HEATHROW EXPANSION GROUPS WELCOME ‘DECISIVE ACTION’

3rd October 2018  (No 3rd Runway Coalition)

Plans for Heathrow expansion will meet their first legal test on Thursday as claimants against the proposals seek to proceed their cases to full judicial review (1).

Five parties have lodged judicial review claims against the plans (1), including:

  • A consortium of local authorities (Hillingdon, Hammersmith & Fulham, Richmond, Wandsworth and Windsor & Maidenhead), Greenpeace and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan.
  • Heathrow Hub Limited (promoters of a rival scheme to expand Heathrow)
  • Friends of the Earth
  • Plan B, an environmental justice organisation
  • Neil Spurrier – a resident of Twickenham, Middlesex

The claims are against the Government’s National Policy Statement – which only included Heathrow expansion – which Parliament voted on in June 2018, despite many unanswered questions about the projects legality and wider environmental impact (2).

Campaigners, residents and politicians, including John McDonnell MP, will be holding a lively ‘solidarity event’ outside the High Court from 9am on Thursday (3).

The No 3rd Runway Coalition, whose membership comprises a number of claimants (3), welcomed the process and warned that the process was now underway, with the chance to highlight the severe negative impacts the project would have.

Paul McGuinness, Chair of the No 3rd Runway Coalition, said:

The legal actions against the government’s decision to expand Heathrow is supported by a very large number of communities, who firmly believe that the negative environmental impact of this highly disruptive airport should not be allowed to grow.

“Having ignored evidence, such as the report of parliament’s Transport Select Committee, the decision to expand Heathrow was always going to end up in the courts, under judicial review, and we are delighted that the process has now started and welcome this decisive action by a number of parties.”

It is envisaged that the issues raised by the claimants (relating primarily to environmental impacts, and the ignoring or withholding of evidence in the decision-making process) will be heard in March 2019.

ENDS.

Notes:

  1. Briefing on the legal action against the NPS here NPS Judicial Review briefing 3.10.2018 including background details of those who have launched action.
  2. On 4 October, a pre-trial hearing will be held, to determine which claims for Judicial Review of the government’s Airports National Statement (NPS) are to be heard. Despite its title, the government’s NPS solely concerns the expansion of Heathrow Airport from two runways to three.
  3. Members of the No 3rdRunway Coalition include five local authorities, Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, who have all lodged claimshttps://www.no3rdrunwaycoalition.co.uk/members.
  4. Campaigners, politicians and residents will be gathering outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand, London, from 9am on Thursday. Campaigners will be available for interview throughout the day.
  5. Government lawyers have already conceded that all applicants are likely to get permission to proceed with their applications for Judicial Review of the government’s National Policy Statement, so are unlikely to oppose the granting of permissions at this pre-trial hearing.

For more information, including media interview requests, contact:

Rob Barnstone,Coordinator | No 3rd Runway Coalition

07806 947050 or Robert.barnstone@outlook.com

@NoR3Coalition | www.no3rdrunwaycoalition.co.uk

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