Harmondsworth Open Day shows the extent of the threat of a Heathrow runway, and what it would destroy

On Sunday 12th April the village of Harmondsworth hosted an open day, to show off the village – and inform visitor about what plans for a Heathrow north-west runway would mean for the area.  The Heathrow Villages are fighting for their survival.  If Heathrow is allowed to build its north west runway, Harmondsworth will be destroyed.  Much of it would be built over, with the airport’s northern boundary slicing off around half of the village. Longford would disappear altogether. During the open day, held on the village green, there were tours of the magnificent early 15th Century Great Barn, and walking tours of the village and of Harmondsworth Moor. A huge canvas had been created, showing a plane and a wire boundary fence – which would be where the airport would come to within a few yards of the current village centre. Though the Great Barn and the Church of St Mary the Virgin would not be demolished, their proximity to the airport boundary would mean the level of noise and air pollution would be intolerable. In an effective short video, Neil Keveren explains how people in the area have been living through hell, unable to plan for their future – or even make decisions about whether to do improvement work on their homes – because of the Sword of Damocles threat hanging over them. And Christine Taylor shows on a map what would be destroyed.
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Campaigners protest over third runway at Heathrow

12.4.2015

Stop Heathrow Expansion

A day of action was held at Harmondsworth, near Heathrow, to highlight “the devastation” that local residents and campaigners know would be caused by a third runway.

Historic buildings would be under threat in villages around the airport from the development with hundreds of thousands more flights causing extra noise and pollution across the Thames Valley and over London.

Harmondsworth is one of attractive Heathrow villages, and residents are working hard to protect its historic buildings and community.

Its magnificent early 15th-century Great Barn was described by Sir John Betjeman as the cathedral of Middlesex.

http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2015-04-13/campaigners-protest-over-third-runway-at-heathrow/

Stop Heathrow Expansion


Map below showing Harmondsworth village, and approximate line where Heathrow airport’s northern boundary, with a new north-west boundary, would demolish the southern half of the village.

Harmondsworth sliced

Film on YouTube

Film on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvJmG4M1soU&feature=youtu.be
While the village communities of Harmondsworth and Sipson will be torn apart by a third runway,
The village of Longford will be erased from the map
With it hundreds of years of English heritage will be buried beneath the tarmac.
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http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/harmondsworth-takes-stand-against-heathrows-9089555

Harmondsworth takes stand against Heathrow’s third runway plans

21.4.2015 (Get West London)

The village united with parliamentary candidates for an open day to show what would be lost if Heathrow’s third runway plans are approved

Harmondsworth villagers unite in their stance against the third runway

Harmondsworth villagers staged an open day to show members of the public what would be destroyed if a third runway at Heathrow Airport goes ahead.

Residents of the ancient village were joined by prospective parliamentary candidates for Hayes & Harlington on April 12 to make a stand against the third runway.

The event was organised by Stop Heathrow Expansion (SHE) and Friends of the Great Barn to protect Harmondsworth, which originated as a Saxon manor.

John McDonnell, previous MP and Labour candidate for Hayes & Harlington, said: “I am confident that we can defeat the threat of a third runway once again and once and for all.

“I was so pleased to see the Heathrow villagers rallying to our campaign to save the village once more.

“The Harmondsworth open day demonstrated what a beautiful village would be lost if the third runway went ahead.”

The parliamentary candidates stopped for photos to reiterate their stand against a possible third runway at Heathrow.

Alick Munro, Green candidate for Hayes & Harlington, said: “As a GP with patients in Harlington, I am daily made aware of the effects of air pollution. About one in three of my patients asks for help to cope with their cough, even although the prevalence of smoking in the area is low.

“Nitric oxide and small particle pollution from traffic fumes are well known to make runny nose and itchy eyes worse and aggravate the results of lung function tests.”

UKIP’s Cliff Dixon said: “The residents of Hillingdon have overwhelmingly rejected the project in a referendum. It is time the government and the airport listened to the wishes of the people.”

A focus of the event was the reopening of the 15th-century Great Barn since the completion of major repairs by English Heritage.

Poet Sir John Betjeman, who spoke to visitors at the event, described the barn as “the cathedral of Middlesex”, which was saved from developers by the intervention of a group of determined villagers.

Neil Keveren, chair of Stop Heathrow Expansion (SHE), said: “This is a chance for us to show to the world that we are utterly determined to fight for our homes and our community. We will not be going anywhere else.”

The event included the unveiling of a giant mural on Cambridge Close, especially created for the open day, to illustrate the proposed airport boundary cutting through the village.

Mr Keveren added: “We are thankful for the backing we have received from Hillingdon Council and from Harts, the community arts project”.

As well as displaying the mural, SHE and HARTS set up a tree-planting planting project in the Heathrow Villages, with the first tree planted in Harmondsworth Recreation Ground on the day.

World War Two RAF veteran Tommy Thomas, who is one of the oldest residents of the village at age 93, was chosen to plant the oak tree.

As well as the oak, nine new trees now form a triangular grove just south of Harmondsworth primary school.

The Airports Commission has been examining potential sites for new runways in the South East and is expected to publish its final report in June.

SHE hopes to take the canvas on its folding frame to various locations before the Davies Commission announces its recommendation.

http://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/news/west-london-news/harmondsworth-takes-stand-against-heathrows-9089555

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Campaigners’ artwork shows life with a third runway

12.4.2015 (SHE – Stop Heathrow Expansion)

A huge artwork created by campaign group, Stop Heathrow Expansion (SHE), was used on Sunday 12th April to show Harmondsworth residents how a new airport boundary would cut through their village.

New boundary would cut across Cambridge Close in Harmondsworth

Neil Keveren explaining the huge canvas to the crowd

The painted canvas depicts a wire airport perimeter fence, in front of an imposing aircraft with a control tower in the background.  Two solitary residents, shown as silhouettes in the foreground, look through the fence at what was once their village.

As part of the Great Barn Open Day event, the portable canvas was unveiled in Cambridge Close.  If Heathrow’s North West option for a third runway is given the go ahead, the Close would be demolished together with all the homes and businesses to the south of the published boundary line, including the primary school.  Current plans indicate The Crown public house and properties lining the village green would be left.

Neil Keveren, SHE’s Chair, unveiled the artwork with the assistance of two climate change protestors dressed as polar bears. Representatives from Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, Plane Stupid, Transition Heathrow and HACAN, showed their support by placing their logos on the painted fence.

Local politicians and parliamentary candidates from the Labour, Conservative, UKIP and Green parties also joined villagers to pledge their support for the anti-expansion campaign.

SHE hopes to take the canvas on its folding frame to various locations before the Davies Commission announces its recommendation in June.

There is a moving and expressive short film, showing how the Harmondsworth village will be devastated, with half destroyed.


 

Film on YouTube

Film on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvJmG4M1soU&feature=youtu.be
While the village communities of Harmondsworth and Sipson will be torn apart by a third runway,
The village of Longford will be erased from the map
With it hundreds of years of English heritage will be buried beneath the tarmac.

Map shows the area (red line) that would be compulsorily purchased (750homes), for a Heathrow north west runway, and the area (purple line) which Heathrow will now also offer to buy (total 3,750 homes). Details here

Map below shows Heathrow north west runway location, and approximate airport boundary. From Heathrow document.

Heathrow north west runway option 31.7.2013


 

Candidates from (l-r) UKIP, Conservatives, Labour and the Green Party show their support.

http://www.stopheathrowexpansion.co.uk/she-artwork-shows-life-with-a-third-runway/

Read more »

Gatwick rushes to offer money – if it gets a 2nd runway – to support and incentivise new domestic air services

After Heathrow got itself some good publicity in its runway campaign, by saying it would spend £10 million to set up some new regional routes, Gatwick has been panicked into doing the same. It appears to have had to rush out a paper, stating it will spend £20 million over 10 years to strengthen domestic air services.  Only if it gets a second runway. The paper setting out its plan contains little text, and gives no references or sources for the figures it uses.  Gatwick says it already serves 11 destinations within the UK compared with 7 at Heathrow.  Gatwick says its plans for a 2nd runway will “encourage the growth of regional airports and the development of international services outside London and the South East” though it does not explain how.  It probably means that if there are more long haul flights from an expanded Heathrow, there would be less market demand for these flights from regional airports, and they would thus suffer (which is true).  Following what Heathrow has already offered, Gatwick says it will consult on reducing landing charges for regional flights.  If Gatwick wasn’t so busy lobbying around Heathrow, and with negative campaigning about Heathrow, it might have thought of some of these ideas for itself, rather than just being a pastiche of Heathrow.

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Gatwick to launch £20 million fund to support and incentivise new domestic and regional air services

10/04/2015

  • £20 million fund among a raft of measures to strengthen domestic air services
  • Gatwick already provides better connectivity to the regions and nations
  • Expansion at Gatwick supports the growth of domestic services and airports

Gatwick Airport will establish a £20 million fund to support new air services to Gatwick from around the UK in the ten years following the opening of a second runway.

Gatwick already serves 11 destinations within the UK compared with seven at Heathrow. This initiative is designed to ensure that the benefits of a second runway also extends to further improving connectivity between the regions and nations and London. Gatwick’s plans for a second runway will also encourage the growth of regional airports and the development of international services outside London and the South East.

Gatwick’s plans aims to strengthen the whole of the UK’s network of airports whereas Heathrow’s plans aim to concentrate international traffic through Heathrow itself, restricting the growth of airports outside the capital.

The fund can be used to incentivise airlines to introduce new services. The fund can also be used to provide jointly-agreed marketing support to regional development or other tourism bodies in regional England or Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland for new services. Along with the fund, Gatwick will also:

  • Propose and consult on changes to charges to support the growth of national and regional air services and encourage easier connection between airlines
  • Support funding applications for new Public Sector Obligation services, and
  • Work with Government to explore how to safeguard slots for new national and regional services.

Launching the fund at a presentation to Prospective Parliamentary Candidates at the Cornwall Chamber of Commerce today, Stewart Wingate, Gatwick CEO, said:

“Gatwick has always been serious about encouraging the growth and development of a strong network of competing airports around the UK. This fund – and the measures we propose to support it – will improve connectivity to London for those that need it. 

“Gatwick expansion is best for the UK and regions because it supports not only the growth of connectivity to London, but also more connectivity between all UK airports and international short and long haul destinations. 

“Expanding Gatwick will provide more competition and choice for passengers all around the UK.

An independent report issued recently by the OECD found that the increased prices an expanded Heathrow would charge, would discourage more flights to other UK airports. The report also said a bigger Heathrow would also ‘diminish’ the chance of new long haul services flying directly out of other UK airports.

Gatwick is not only already better connected to the regions than Heathrow, it is also far cheaper for airlines and passengers. Heathrow already has the highest airport charges in the world – in addition to landing and parking charges, Heathrow charges £29.59 per domestic departing passenger compared to Gatwick’s charge of £10.52 per domestic departing passenger.  [Heathrow will cut its charge for domestic passengers to £19.59  from 1.1.2016.  See details ]

 

Ends

 

For more information on why Gatwick is best for regional growth and connectivity, see its regional proposal in full here.

 

Gatwick claims  its expansion:  

  • is affordable, sustainable and deliverable (unlike Heathrow’s proposal)
  • will help deliver lower fares through lower airport charges and greater competition
  • offers a more convenient choice of London airports for passengers, and
  • will help sustain and encourage more services direct from other national and regional airports

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/press-releases/2015/2015-04-10-regional-fund.aspx

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See also:

Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

Saad Hammad, the chief executive of Flybe, has criticised Gatwick for failing to address the needs of Britain’s regions, in its attempt to win support for its second runway. The head of the UK’s biggest regional airline said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights and “I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like…. Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.” Heathrow has said it would look at cutting charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made. These cuts are largely to deter passengers flying via Schiphol or other European hubs, rather than concern for the regional airports. Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and only one from Gatwick to Newquay. It sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013. A spokesman for Gatwick said that it had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even if Heathrow reduced their domestic fees. Gatwick said it is planning to give details of its proposals on fees further later this month. It has claimed its landing charges would not rise above £15 per passenger, but only it gets a 2nd runway and Government agrees a contract not to allow any other runway in the south east for 30 years ….

Click here to view full story…

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to reduce number flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59.  They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral.  The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead.  The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges.  Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes,including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

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Heathrow would spend £10 million to increase some domestic flights, only if granted a 3rd runway, to get backing from regions

Heathrow has increasingly cut the number of flights to UK regional airports, as it has become more uneconomic for the airlines to run them – and long haul international routes are more profitable. But Heathrow is aware that it needs to get the backing of regional airports, in order to lobby to be allowed a 3rd runway. Heathrow therefore suggested the setting up of a National Connectivity Task Force. In order to boost flights to the regions, Heathrow now says that – only IF it gets a new runway – it will spend £10 million on for the development of 5 new domestic routes, for 3 years. These would include Newquay, Humberside and Liverpool. That would be in addition to the 4 extra routes that easyJet has said it wants to operate if there is a Heathrow runway, to Inverness, Belfast International, the Isle of Man and Jersey. There are currently 6 domestic routes from Heathrow (Leeds Bradford, Belfast City, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Newcastle). Heathrow also said it would launch a review of its airport charges in the coming weeks to focus on making domestic flights more commercially attractive (cheaper) to airlines. The results of this consultation, which is not dependent upon getting a new runway, will be effective from January 2016.

Click here to view full story…

Liverpool airport says ‘we will talk to anyone’ as Gatwick announces £20 million fund and Heathrow announces £10 million…

Liverpool John Lennon Airport says it would be happy to speak to Gatwick Airport about regional routes, after Gatwick put out a press release to say (copying Heathrow’s earlier offer) it would spend up to £20 million to help support regional air routes. Gatwick and Heathrow offers only apply if that airport got a new runway, not otherwise. Liverpool Airport has already been in talks with Heathrow about the possibility of getting a link there (if there is a new runway) – as Heathrow is keen not to lose connecting flights, if people in the regions prefer to fly via Schiphol. However, Gatwick’s offer would have far less appeal than Heathrow’s to Liverpool Airport because it does not offer a connection to a hub, for long haul flights. A spokesman for Liverpool airport said: “We are always open to suggestions for new routes and we are happy to speak to anyone.” Heathrow says it is offering a £10 million fund to support regional routes, to five airports over 3 years. Those named are Liverpool, Newquay and Humberside. On 31st March Liverpool announced that Flybe would operate a service up to 3-times-a-day to Schiphol starting on September 7th. ie. They would not then need links to Gatwick or to Heathrow.

Click here to view full story…


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In Gatwick’s little report (not a lot of content, lots of pretty pictures …) it states:

“It is estimated that airport charges alone at an expanded Heathrow will rise to over £80 for a return trip compared to £30 at Gatwick after expansion.”  [This is very different to the assessment by the Commission, of up about  maximum of £58 for Heathrow and £46 for Gatwick]. See below
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But the Airports Commission said – about the Gatwick runway:“3.41Investment of this scale would entail increases in the airport’s charges to airlines. Gatwick Airport Ltd has estimated, for example, that per passenger charges would rise from £9 currently to £12-15 as a result of expansion. This is lower than the charges predicted by the Commission’s analysis, which indicate average charges rising to between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23.”Gatwick Airport second runway: business case and sustainability assessment
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/373211/evidence-base-gatwick-airport-second-runway.pdf
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and

On the Heathrow north-west runway, the Commission said:

“The resulting impact to passenger aeronautical charges across the Commission’s four demand scenarios for Heathrow is an increase from c. £20 per passenger to an average of c. £27-29 per passenger”…

Heathrow Airport Extended Northern Runway: Business Case and Sustainability Assessment
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/374663/evidence-base-heathrow-airport-extended-northern-runway.pdf

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Read more »

Forests and lakes destroyed to build Istanbul’s vast 3rd airport aerotropolis covering 76 square kilometers of land

Istanbul is building a third airport, north of the city close to the Terkos lake area.  Istanbul already has Atatürk Airport on the European side and Sabiha Gökçen airport on the Asian side (these handle around 45 million and 15 million passengers respectively per year), but both claim to be struggling with increased demand – being well located as a hub between Europe, the Middle East and the East.  Their national airline, Turkish Airlines, is growing fast. The site for the 3rd airport, which is to be an Aerotropolis, not merely an airport, is about 76 square kilometres. The third airport is linked with other forest destroying megaprojects – a third bridge over the Bosphorus, a motorway and a canal linking the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara. All three are linked and feed into each other.  The vast construction works destroy areas of forest, lakes and ponds – causing serious local concern about biodiversity loss, loss of natural habitat and possible future heat island and water supply problems.  Turkey wants another vast airport, perhaps able to take up to 150 million passengers per year, partly to boost its chances of getting the Olympics in 2024. The busiest airport in the world now, Atlanta, handles about 95 million passengers per year.  A short video shows the ongoing environmental destruction, during the building of the airport. https://vimeo.com/123657571
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Forests and lakes destroyed for Istanbul’s 3rd airport

 

Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ (the ‘North Forest Defence’) which campaigns to protect the forests to the north of Istanbul, has made an English language version of a shocking video. (Vimeo  3 mins 20 secs)

It documents the destruction of forests for the city’s third airport. Its ecocide: piles of felled trees; a long line of earth moving trucks nose to tail along the highway; bulldozers gouging away at the earth; forests, lakes and meadows destroyed. A sheep farmer explains that there is nowhere for him to tend his animals once the construction site is fenced off and fears dreadful consequences of the loss of the forest, it attracts rainfall that the city depends upon.

The forest protectors want the world to know what is happening here. People sharing this video in English on social media are urged to use the hashtag #‎ResistAgainstInstanbul3rdAirport‬

The third airport is linked with other forest destroying megaprojects – a third bridge over the Bosphorus, a motorway and a canal linking the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara.

On 26th March Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ held a press conference during which architect Mücella Yapıcı warned of irreversible ecological damage from the airport and other megaprojects, and announced that several business chambers, including the Chamber of Architects and the Chamber of Engineers, have united to open a court case relating to two Environmental Impact Reports. Both reports, prepared for investors, emphasised serious ecological destruction, with Yapıcı stating ‘This is the massacre of Istanbul. We cannot just sit here silently and allow this’.

At the press conference, Kuzey Ormanları Savunması​ presented its latest report. Entitled Life, Nature, Environment, Humanity and the Law against the Third Airport Project (article in Turkish – but a Google translation gives a workable understanding of what it is saying !)  it explains that the megaprojects – the bridge, highway, canal and airport – are interconnected and designed to feed each others’ growth.

The report also reveals that the new airport is not just an airport; it is a plan for an aerotropolis (a city built around an airport), on a site of over 76 square kilometres.

Even if the new airport reaches its stated goal of 150 million passengers per year (which would make it the world’s busiest airport), the land area far exceeds that which would be required for aeronautical operations. Currently, Atlanta Airport in the US is the world’s busiest passenger airport, handling 95 million passengers per year, covering a site of 16.25 square kilometres.

The aerotropolis plan is designed to trigger development on land surrounding it including business, cultural and sports complexes, sprawling over the last remaining pristine natural areas of the area.

Negative environmental impacts from felling of forests include loss of climate regulation through oxygen production and carbon sequestration. There are serious concerns over the concreting over of lakes which is a threat to Istanbul’s water supply and the loss of habitat hosting an abundance of wildlife such as wolves, insects and at least 160 species of birds.

http://antiaero.org/2015/04/01/forests-and-lakes-destroyed-for-istanbuls-3rd-airport-2/

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Some extracts (very imperfect translation into English – apologies…. ) from the Turkish article at  http://www.radikal.com.tr/cevre/istanbul_aerotropolis_oluyor-1321969

Airport not Aerotropolis

26.3.2015
North Forest Defense resistance … has prepared a report on the planned 3rd airport.
…..According to the report, the airport project is actually a city complex. Therefore, Istanbul, aero (air) and Tropolis (metropolis-metropolitan) consisting of words and the way to becoming a new concept Aerotropolis.
…. It Is not only the airport under the project, the EIA report ‘Airport City Complex’ under the title, business center, the congress and cultural centers and sports complexes are mentioned ….
… Istanbul ‘s north airport is an attraction for the construction industry …. and  ‘is designed to trigger a variety of development projects around creating project. This project, a management wheel of the economy tied to the construction industry, the last remaining pristine areas of Istanbul opening to plunder ………….”
….
The report noted the following:
* the 3rd airport project is a package of 3 things, with an Istanbul bridge and Canal  project. Each of these projects is planned to feed the other.. The 3rd airport’s positioning in this region and the North Marmara Motorway brought into the center of attraction of the route passing through the channel.
….. 90% of the wetlands and forests and this particular area will be covered by airport concrete building.
….  90% percent of lakes and forests of this special region will be covered in concrete and contribute to an urban heat island.
…. The World is entering era of thirst, and Istanbul will lose its water resources.
… The benefits of forests (wood production, water production, climate regulation, carbon sequestration and oxygen production, reduce air pollution, habitat of living and so on) would decrease.
….. This is not a land where other natural habitat is being developed. There is much biodiversity in the forest and the lakes and ponds that are being destroyed.
….. This project will increase the drought and water shortage in the opposite direction to one side to take measures against drought and thirst, and are projects that will accelerate.
…. the authorities say there are 17 species of birds in the region, but other ornithologists say there are 160 species or even 200 bird species.
…. there are issues about the direction the planes will land, into the wind.
….. Due to increasing foreign debt interest and exchange rates, €22 billion to €152 million have been ??? received by the consortium for the 3rd airport. The cost of the airport’s only the first nine months increased by $12.9 billion.
….. the new Aerotropolis planned will be a new city, to rival Istanbul, not merely an airport.
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Construction of Istanbul’s third airport continues at full throttle despite concerns

ISTANBUL – Anadolu Agency

The new airport is expected to host 150 million passengers each year. AA Photo

The new airport is expected to host 150 million passengers each year. AA Photo

Construction of Istanbul’s third airport continues at full throttle despite concerns

9.11.2014  (Turkish Daily News)

Construction of Istanbul’s third airport is continuing, in a bid to establish in Turkey’s largest city what the government hopes will be the most important center of world air traffic.

The Cengiz-Kolin-Limak-Mapa-Kalyon Consortium, a joint venture of Turkish companies, is continuing ground works with the grant holder of the site Istanbul Grand Airport (IGA). Company officials say the operations are ongoing on 76.5 square kilometers of land.

The controversial facility, promoted by the government to showcase development, will become not only Istanbul’s largest airport but also one of the world’s major hubs. Its construction in one of the city’s most precious natural areas, however, has drawn criticism from activists denouncing a culture of plunder and destruction.

There are currently two different lawsuits opened by the Chamber of Environmental Engineers against the contracting of the airport construction, but there has been no development in the cases in the last two years. The Northern Forest Defense, an environmental group that has long been advocating against the third airport and bridge, has launched an online campaign under the hashtag “Resist the third airport.”

With local and foreign experts overseeing the work, a total of 780 geological surveys have been conducted since the beginning of works in March 2014, along with 1,020 soil sample tests and 9,000 Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPT), according to the project’s geotechnical reports.

The Turkish Aviation Organization and Administration, which is under the authority of the General Directorate of State Airports, is following the coordination and management of the project’s progress. The airport is planned to be opened in 2017.

November/09/2014

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/construction-of-istanbuls-third-airport-continues-at-full-throttle-despite-concerns.aspx?pageID=238&nID=74079&NewsCatID=340


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See earlier:

Turkey plans to build a 6-runway mega airport near Istanbul to be one of the world’s largest

Turkey is planning to build one of the world’s biggest airports, and one larger than anything in Europe, costing some $5bn.  It wants to make Istanbul a global hub and boost its chances of getting the Olympics in 2020. Turkey is well situated geographically for traffic between the USA and Europe, and the Far East. It is therefore in competition with other Middle East and Gulf countries, which are also building mega-sized airports, such as Dubai and Doha (capital of Qatar). A tender will be held in may for the Turkish airport.  This would be the third airport for Istanbul, which already has Ataturk airport, and Sabiha airport – which handle around 45 million and 15 million passengers respectively per year. The new airport will be near the Black Sea, and is anticipated to be able to cope with 150 million passengers per year. By contrast, Heathrow deals with some 69 million, and Atlanta – the world’s busiest airport – handles some 90 million per year. The plans are for the new 6 runway airport to be open by 2017.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2013/01/manchester-ditch-c-charge-sell-airport/

 


 

 

31.10.2012

Third Istanbul airport to be formed in northwest

ISTANBUL – Doğan News Agency

Istanbul’s third airport will likely be built in the Terkos Lake area, Mayor Kadir Topbaş has said.

“Following the advice of our prime minister, we are starting the construction of a new Istanbul airport with five or six runways and a passenger capacity of 100 million in the short term, which will be increased to 150 million,” Topbaş said, adding that Atatürk Airport’s current capacity was 34 million passengers.

Topbaş said the Terkos Lake area, 50 kilometers north of Istanbul on the Black Sea coast, was a very strong possibility for the airport’s location.

Topbaş said Atatürk Airport was insufficient to handle the city’s air traffic, particularly in regards to strong southwestern winds.

A third airport in Istanbul, the largest city in the country, has long been on the agenda as Atatürk Airport on the European side and Sabiha Gökçen airport on the Asian side are struggling to meet the city’s rising demands, particularly as national flag carrier Turkish Airlines boosts its flights and the city attracts more visitors.Topbaş said the airport would be built on a deserted site to preserve the area’s natural, forested environment, adding that a proposal for the project would likely be initiated by the end of the year.

Topbaş also said the construction of a third bridge to span the Bosphorus in Istanbul would be completed by 2015 or 2016.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/third-istanbul-airport-to-be-formed-in-northwest.aspx?pageID=238&nID=33620&NewsCatID=341

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/third-istanbul-airport-to-be-formed-in-northwest.aspx?pageID=238&nID=33620&NewsCatID=341 
The recent announcement of a series of huge infrastructural projects to be parachuted onto the northern area of Istanbul – a third airport, a new city for millions on the coast of the Black Sea, a new canal to mitigate the pressure on The Bosporus, and a new highway connecting all these projects to Europe and Asia, which will cross the Bosporus over a new, third bridge – raises questions about the soundness of the city’s sustainability policy. Unless ecological interests will be integrated into the new plans, natural resources, especially sweet water supplies, will come under serious threat.
http://iabr.nl/en/nieuws/istanbul-op-tweesprong

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£2.8m project led by Stirling University on tackling airport congestion and best use of capacity

Stirling University has announced it is leading a major 6 year, £2.8 million, project that focuses on tackling UK airport congestion.  The project will examine the better use of existing capacity and resources – rather than sole reliance on new airport building and expansion – resulting in benefits to both the industry and travellers. The team of Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers, led by Professor Edmund Burke will be looking at the best ways to allocate runway capacity. The programme is called the OR-MASTER (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources). They will work on the EPSRC-funded (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) research with colleagues from Lancaster University Management School. The study will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is as efficient and effective as possible. The aim to produce a better solution not just for the UK, but for internationally, in finding the most efficient ways to schedule flights, developing and testing new models and solution algorithms for the allocation of flight ‘slots.’  It aims to get a better understanding of the trade-off  between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule  delays.

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£2.8m project by Stirling expert on tackling airport congestion

19 March 2015  (Stirling University)
A major £2.8 million project led by Stirling and Lancaster University teams, which will focus on tackling UK airport congestion, is announced today.

 

The project will examine the better use of existing capacity and resources – rather than sole reliance on new airport building and expansion – resulting in benefits to both the industry and travellers.

Professor Edmund Burke, Senior Deputy Principal and Deputy Vice-Chancellor, will lead a team of Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers at the University of Stirling in the OR-MASTER Programme Grant (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources).

They will work on the EPSRC-funded (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) research with colleagues from Lancaster University Management School.

The six-year study comes amid growing concerns over airport capacity, rising demand, and the impact of congestion on both the travelling public and the air transport industry.

Professor Burke said: “It is recognised that as economies grow and as the need for air travel grows, greater capacity at airports is required. We are delighted to receive this grant, which will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is being realised as efficiently and effectively as possible.

“By incorporating the needs of a wide variety of stakeholders, including air space operators, airports, airlines and travellers, we aim to produce a better solution not just for the UK, but for the wider international community.”

The work will build on the UK’s world-leading expertise in Operational Research to find the most efficient ways to schedule flights, developing and testing new models and solution algorithms that take into account all the factors involved in the allocation of flight ‘slots': individual airport operations, networks of airports, airline operations, air traffic management systems, airport authorities, civil aviation authorities, airlines and the travelling public.

Project lead, Professor Konstantinos G. Zografos at Lancaster University Management School, said: “Existing approaches to airport slot allocation do not consider all the real-world complexity involved. Therefore, there is room to improve airport capacity utilization which will benefit airlines, airports and the travelling public.

“It will support policy makers and air transport decision makers here and overseas in getting to grips with airport congestion and in optimally allocating scarce airport resources. The air transport industry generally will benefit from acquiring a better understanding of the trade-off  between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule  delays.”

EPSRC Chief Executive Professor Philip Nelson said: “Put simply, world-class projects like this help to make the UK the best place in the world to research, discover and innovate. This investment will fuel the UK’s technological progress, help address the challenges of today and tomorrow, and contribute to a strong economy.”

Professor Gerry McCormac, University of Stirling Principal and Vice-Chancellor, said: “Professor Edmund Burke’s research is globally renowned. This multimillion pound award, which he and colleagues from Lancaster University have received from the EPSRC, will address congestion at airports around the world.

“At Stirling we are known for world-class research that tackles real life problems. Our excellence in research was demonstrated in the recent UK wide Research Excellence Framework, which positioned us as the 5th most research-intensive university in Scotland and 40th in the UK. Almost three quarters of our research activity was rated as either internationally excellent or world-leading.”

OR-MASTER will involve close collaboration between the two Universities and a host of international organisations, who will provide real-world data, insights and expertise. The project represents a strong partnership between academia, the air transport industry and policy makers.

The project will create opportunities for 12 new researchers – six at each institution – to gain experience with international research centres and air transport industry organisations.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/news/2015/03/airport-capacity-study/


 

 

Experts address UK airport congestion

19 March 2015

By Katie Sadler ( International Airport Review)

Experts have today revealed a programme to address UK airport congestion and capacity without a reliance on new airport building and expansion.

The OR-MASTER Programme Grant (Mathematical Models and Algorithms for Allocating Scarce Airport Resources) has been established in response to growing concerns over airport capacity, rising demand, and the impact of congestion on both the travelling public and the air transport industry. The £2.8 million project will be managed by a team at Lancaster University Management School, working with Computing, Science and Mathematics researchers at the University of Stirling. The research has been funded by the EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council).

Work carried out will address efficient ways to schedule flights and develop and test new models and solution algorithms that take into account all the factors involved in the allocation of flight ‘slots': individual airport operations, networks of airports, airline operations, air traffic management systems, airport authorities, civil aviation authorities, airlines and the travelling public.

Project lead, Professor Konstantinos G. Zografos at Lancaster University Management School, said: “Existing approaches to airport slot allocation do not consider all the real-world complexity involved. Therefore, there is room to improve airport capacity utilization which will benefit airlines, airports and the travelling public.

“It will support policy makers and air transport decision makers here and overseas in getting to grips with airport congestion and in optimally allocating scarce airport resources. The air transport industry generally will benefit from acquiring a better understanding of the trade-off between capacity utilization, and passenger and airline schedule delays.

Professor Kevin Glazebrook from Lancaster University Management School also commented: “There is an international research effort to find solutions to a problem that’s high on the agenda for air transport decision and policy makers globally. With its reputation in Operational Research, the UK should be leading the way in meeting this challenge, and the new funding will help us do that.”

The project at the University of Stirling will be led by Professor Edmund Burke, current Senior Deputy Principal and Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Professor Burke said: “It is recognised that as economies grow and as the need for air travel grows, greater capacity at airports is required. We are delighted to receive this grant, which will investigate – from a mathematical and computational perspective – whether capacity management is being realised as efficiently and effectively as possible.”

The OR-MASTER project will take place over a six year period collaborating with a host of organisations internationally that will provide both insight and expertise. Organisations involved include the National Air Traffic Services (NATS); Eurocontrol (managing air traffic across Europe); Park Air Systems; KLM Air France; Zurich Airport and Athens International Airport; the research organisations linked to the national air navigation services for Italy and Spain (SICTA and CRIDA); SESAR (Single European Sky research body); the Airport Services Association; Goldair Handling; ACI Europe (Airports Council International); the HALA! SESAR network of leading researchers in Europe working in the area of Air Traffic Management automation; NEXTOR II (National Centre of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research); the MIT International Centre for Air Transport Research (MIT-ICAT) in the USA; and DLR, the German Airspace Research Centre.

EPSRC Chief Executive Professor Philip Nelson commented on the upcoming programme: “Put simply, world-class projects like this help to make the UK the best place in the world to research, discover and innovate. This investment will fuel the UK’s technological progress, help address the challenges of today and tomorrow, and contribute to a strong economy.”

http://www.internationalairportreview.com/19129/airport-news/experts-address-uk-airport-congestion/

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Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

Saad Hammad, the chief executive of Flybe, has criticised Gatwick for failing to address the needs of Britain’s regions, in its attempt to win support for its second runway. The head of  the UK’s biggest regional airline said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights and “I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like…. Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.”  Heathrow has said it would look at cutting charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made. These cuts are largely to deter passengers flying via Schiphol or other European hubs, rather than concern for the regional airports. Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and only one from Gatwick to Newquay. It sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013. A spokesman for Gatwick said that it had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even if Heathrow reduced their domestic fees. Gatwick said it is planning to give details of its proposals on fees further later this month. It has claimed its landing charges would not rise above £15 per passenger, but only it gets a 2nd runway and Government agrees a contract not to allow any other runway in the south east for 30 years ….
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Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

By Phil Davies (Travel Weekly)
8.4.2015

Gatwick has been accused by the boss of Flybe of failing to address the needs of UK regions in its fight with rival Heathrow to win support for expansion.

The regional carrier’s chief executive, Saad Hammad, said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights.

“I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like,” he told the Financial Times. “Right now, Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.”

Heathrow has pledged to cut charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made.

Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and just one from Gatwick to Newquay, having sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013.

A Gatwick spokesman said that the airport had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even domestic fees were reduced.

It is planning to set out its own proposals on how to improve fees further later this month.

“UK plc needs a network of long-haul airports that provide direct services around the world, rather than forcing all flights through a single-hub airport in the capital,” the Gatwick spokesman said.

http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/Articles/2015/04/08/53749/flybe+accuses+gatwick+of+ignoring+uk+regions.html

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 See earlier: 

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to deter passengers flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59. They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral. The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead. The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges. Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

Gatwick “promises” to cap landing charges to £15 + inflation for 30 years (if it gets an unspecified 30 year “contract” from Government)

Gatwick airport, in frenetic publicity in the months before the Airports Commission runway recommendation (expected late June) has made various pledges – in the hope of currying favour. It says it will “bear all the main risks” of a new runway. Sir Roy McNulty, chairman of Gatwick, has written to Sir Howard Davies saying – among other things – that the landing charge will be kept at £15 (plus inflation) for 30 years. As long as there is no new Heathrow runway. (It is currently £9). Sir Roy said it is “in return for Government agreeing a 30 year contract” though exactly what that means is not explained. Presumably a contract that there will be no other runway? Gatwick also says it will “bear all the main risks of the expansion programme . . . including long-term risks related to traffic levels, market pricing, construction and operating costs”. How exactly? Gatwick’s main airline, EasyJet, is not happy with charges rising to £15. The Airports Commission consultation documents considered Gatwick’s estimate of £15 to be too low, and instead considered “average charges rising to between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23.” These higher levels were due to lower estimated levels of air passenger demand than Gatwick’s optimistic figures, and higher infrastructure costs. [ Airports Commission’s consultation document Page 47].

Click here to view full story…

 

The “30 year contract”

Asked what this contact says, or whether it exists, below is what Gatwick senior management have said:

“The exact nature of the thirty year contract has yet to be finalised – its purpose would be to clarify the commercial and regulatory environment in which we would be operating, including the anticipated timing of any new runways beyond that granted to Gatwick. Whilst we understand that one government cannot bind a future government irreversibly, if there was a legal contract in place and the future proved different from that which had been committed to, the contract could also govern what might happen in those circumstances.”

Make of that what you can !

GACC says Gatwick’s rash promise to cap landing charge at £15 puts its runway plan in doubt

Gatwick airport have made a very rash promise not to raise their landing charges above £15 (plus inflation) for 30 years, if they get a 30 contract from the government (details not specified). Brendon Sewill, of GACC said: “The whole runway project is in doubt…. Gatwick’s rash promise not to raise airport charges above £15 per head …. seriously puts in question whether building a new runway at Gatwick is a viable business proposal – either for the present owners or for the new owners if Gatwick is sold.” The Airports Commission calculate that Gatwick charges would need to rise to ‘between £15 and £18, with peak charges of up to £23. GACC points out that Gatwick’s promises are meaningless unless they are put into a legal agreement binding on the present airport owners – and future owners. If so, the £15 would become a legal maximum – rather than the current £9. Even at £15, some airlines, and passengers might well decide instead to use much cheaper airports such as Stansted or Luton. GACC has pointed out to the Airports Commission the risk that Gatwick may have fewer passengers than forecast, in which case the cap of £15 may not be sufficient to cover the costs of a new runway and new terminal. Brendon Sewill asks: “What would happen if the money runs out when the new runway is only half built?”

Click here to view full story…

 

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Campaigners at London City Airport demand true noise measurement – combining Heathrow + London City flight noise

Campaigners at London City Airport are calling for a change in the way aircraft noise is measured, and more needs to be done to protect people living under noisy flight paths. The group’s chair, John Stewart, says the problem is partly down to a lack of measurement of the cumulative noise produced by flight paths from several airports (Heathrow and London City here) which both affect one area.  He believes separate measurements of just each airport’s noise fail to give a true picture of the impact on residents, resulting in official statistics that underestimate aircraft noise levels. Both need to be combined in order to get a figure for the total noise in order to get an accurate assessment of the real noise levels experienced by residents.  John said: “In the areas of east and south east London, where people get planes from both London City and Heathrow, noise levels will be a lot higher than official statistics show.” The concerns remain despite mayor of London Boris Johnson’s blocking of London City Airport’s proposed expansion. HACAN East says the Greater London Assembly backed cumulative noise readings, from both airports combined, two years ago, and that the airport should recognise this.  It suits the aviation industry to deliberately keep the noise figures separate. 
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Campaigners demand true aircraft noise measurement

6.4.2015  (Newham Recorder)

By Sebastian Murphy-Bates

Campaigners are calling for a change to the way aircraft noise is measured.

Noise pollution activist group HACAN East, which opposed the expansion of London City Airport over aircraft noise fears, says more needs to be done to protect people living under noisy flight paths.

For the group’s chair, John Stewart, the problem is partly down to a lack of measurement of the cumulative noise produced by airports whose flights cross neighbouring areas.

He believes separate measurements of each airport’s noise fail to give a true picture of the impact on residents, resulting in official statistics that underestimate aircraft noise levels.

“We need to get a figure for the total noise if we are to get a picture of the real noise levels experienced by residents,” he said. “In the areas of east and south east London, where people get planes from both London City and Heathrow, noise levels will be a lot higher than official statistics show.”

The concerns remain despite mayor of London Boris Johnson’s blocking of London City Airport’s proposed expansion.

Declan Collier, CEO at London City Airport, told the Recorder that his airport has the strictest noise policiy in the UK.

He cited the airport’s noise mitigation plans in pursuit of the expansion, its adherence to a cap on air movements, commitment to try and reduce noise contour areas, incentives for quieter aircraft and funding for sound-proofing in homes affected by any expansion.

But John Stewart claims the Greater London Assembly backed cumulative noise readings two years ago, and that the airport should recognise this.

And he says that not only are Collier’s measures insufficient – but the industry is intentionally providing the seperate, misleading figures to suit itself.

“It is not rocket science to assess the cumulative noise,” he said. “The suspicion remains that it suits the aviation industry not to paint the full picture.”

http://www.hacaneast.org.uk/

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See also:

Would London City Airport be so cavalier in dealing with its residents if they were richer?

by John Stewart

Last week the London Mayor, Boris Johnson, turned down City Airport’s application to expand on noise grounds.  Although the decision caught people by surprise, there was a widespread feeling that the airport had it coming because of the cavalier way it has dealt with residents, local authorities and elected politicians over the years.  I spelt this out in an opinion piece for the Newham Recorder:http://www.hacaneast.org.uk/?p=643

 The question must arise:  would City Airport’s attitude have been different if it was dealing with a wealthier population?  We will never know for sure it certainly impacts on some of the poorest communities in the UK.

According to the latest Indices of Deprivation (2010), Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest are among 15 most deprived local authorities in the country. And Barking and Dagenham, Greenwich, Lewisham and Lambeth make it into the top 50.  Moreover, Hackney, Newham and Tower Hamlets have highest percentage of deprived people in the UK (1).

They will also be the communities which fly the least.  They are the victims of what Les Blomberg, the executive director of the US-based Noise Pollution Clearing House called ‘second-hand noise’:  “noise that is experienced by people who did not produce it.  Like second-hand smoke, it’s put into the environment without people’s consent and then has effects on them that they don’t have any control over.”

A good neighbour would tailor its strategy, and particularly its communications, to the needs of its communities.  In areas of real deprivation, variable online skills and limited access to technology, a good neighbour would ensure it provided plenty of leaflets and regular face-to-face meetings with the public.  It would make sure its materials were written in clear, simple language.

London City simply does not do this.  The recent consultation on its plans to concentrate its flight paths over particular communities was a prime example.  The consultation took the form of putting a technical document on its website and of informing its supine consultative committee.  Nothing more.  No leafleting of the areas that would be affected.  And by only consulting online, City Airport effectively disenfranchised a huge number of people.  Across the UK, 21% of people can’t operate online, but amongst C2, D and E classes it is 72%; and for those in 65+ bracket it is 52% (2).

 It is hard to avoid the conclusion that London City Airport, rather than trying to tailor its work to meet the needs of the area it impacts, is using the demographics of the area to get away with doing as little as possible.

 References:

(1). http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/29/indices-multiple-deprivation-poverty-england).

 (2). Media Literacy: Understanding Digital Capabilities follow-up; Ipsos Mori, 2014

 

 

 

 

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Historic village of Harmondsworth, threatened by Heathrow 3rd runway, opens its doors on Sunday 12th April

The ancient village of Harmondsworth, which originated as a Saxon manor and is now facing demolition if a 3rd Heathrow runway is built to the north-west of the airport. It is staging an Open Day on Sunday 12th April to give the media and members of the public a chance to see what would be destroyed.  The focus of the event is the re-opening of the celebrated 15th-century Great Barn for the first time since the completion of major repairs by English Heritage.  The Barn, described by poet Sir John Betjeman as “the cathedral of Middlesex”, was saved from developers by the intervention of a group of determined villagers. There will also be the unveiling (1.30pm) of a huge mural, especially created for the occasion, illustrating the proposed airport boundary cutting through the heart of picturesque Harmondsworth.  There will be a visit to the newly-planted trees on the Recreation Ground which demonstrates that the community intends to fight to preserve its historic roots for future generations to enjoy, rather than watch it obliterated by further expansion of the airport.  And there will be Morris dancing at various times throughout the day, as well as walking tours. Organisers, SHE (Stop Heathrow Expansion) say this is a great opportunity to see the unique village of Harmondsworth, and “also to show to the world that we are utterly determined to fight for our homes and our community.  We will not be going anywhere else.” 
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Great Barn

Historic village threatened by 3rd runway opens its doors to the press and public on Sunday 12th April

The ancient village of Harmondsworth, which originated as a Saxon manor and is now facing demolition if a third Heathrow runway goes ahead, will be staging an Open Day on Sunday 12th April to give the media and members of the public a chance to see what would be destroyed.   Download the flyer here.   From 12 noon onwards. 

The focus of the event is the re-opening of the celebrated 15th-century Great Barn for the first time since the completion of major repairs by English Heritage.  The Barn, described by poet Sir John Betjeman as “the cathedral of Middlesex”, was saved from developers by the intervention of a group of determined villagers, who will be available to talk to visitors. It will be open from 11am until 4pm.  

[The Barn is a Grade I listed building. It is essentially unaltered since it was built in 1426 and over 95% of its structural timbers are original. It is owned by English Heritage who bought it in 2011 to add to the National Heritage Collection, and is managed for them by the Friends of the Great Barn. For more details ]

A huge mural, especially created for the occasion, will illustrate the proposed airport boundary cutting through the heart of picturesque Harmondsworth.  It will be unveiled at 1.30pm providing a photo-opportunity on the village green outside the historic Five Bells pub.

This will be followed by a visit to the newly-planted trees on the Recreation Ground which demonstrates that the community intends to fight to preserve its historic roots for future generations to enjoy, rather than watch it obliterated by further expansion of the airport.

[The tree-planting is part of a council-backed project to re-forest the villages threatened by a third runway.  It is a collaborative project between SHE, Transition Heathrow and Harts, the arts network based in the villages:  http://www.communityharts.org/ ]

There will be Morris dancing at various times throughout the day. Datchet Border Morris will be at the Great Barn at 12.00pm; outside the Crown pub at 12.45pm; outside the Five Bells pub at 14.00; and back to the Barn at 14.30pm.

SHE (Stop Heathrow Expansion) worked with the Friends of the Great Barn to organise the Open Day. Neil Keveren, the chair of SHE, said, “This is a great opportunity to see the unique village of Harmondsworth.  But it is also a chance for us to show to the world that we are utterly determined to fight for our homes and our community.  We will not be going anywhere else.”

He added, “We are thankful for the backing we have received from Hillingdon Council and from Harts, the community arts project”.

The Airports Commission has been examining potential sites for new runways in the South East and is expected to publish its final report in June.  It will recommend either a separate third runway at Heathrow, a third runway at Heathrow added to the existing northern runway (This runway would not require the destruction of Harmondsworth), or a second runway at Gatwick.  It would mean the demolition of properties in Poyle, west of the airport. The next Government will consider the recommendation but is not required to endorse it.

SHE  http://www.stopheathrowexpansion.co.uk/

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More information:

Neil Keveren, 07850904677

Christine Taylor 0208 564 8345; 07960490831

Justine Bayley (for info on the Barn), 020 8759 1874

 

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Schiphol airport unfazed by prospect of new London runway – many UK passengers prefer transferring from Schiphol

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis, described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”. Schiphol now handles up to 8 million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights. Schiphol believes passengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a 3rd runway. 13 UK airports have services to Amsterdam and this will rise to 14 next month, with the addition of Belfast.  The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in Heathrow’s lobbying for a new runway, wanting to prevent the loss of customers to Schiphol. And wanting to keep on being the biggest international airport, by far, in Europe.  Jos Nijhuis said: “We are London’s second hub and doing very well. …I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three….We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers.” KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside.” He felt higher charges needed by Heathrow to pay for a new runway would mean the runway would not reduce the traffic going via Schiphol.
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Schiphol unfazed by London airport expansion

Dutch aviation bosses talk in bullish terms about being London’s second hub and how a new runway in the UK’s southeast will fail to challenge that. Ian Taylor reportsPassengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a third runway.That is the view of Schiphol airport and of Dutch carrier KLM, which serves 13 UK airports from Amsterdam and will add a route from Belfast next month.The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in discussions about the need for expanded hub airport capacity for London.The government-appointed Airports Commission is due to report immediately after the May 7 general election, making recommendations on whether to add a runway at Heathrow or Gatwick.

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”.

The airport handles up to eight million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights.

Nijhuis said: “We have flights to 26 destinations in the UK; Heathrow has six. We are London’s second hub and doing very well.

“I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three.’”

KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers (pictured) said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside. Amsterdam is an attractive alternative to Heathrow because everything is under one roof.

“In Amsterdam, we have an airport that handles 55 million passengers a year in a country with a population of 17 million. Logistics is an integral part of the Netherlands economy.”

Nijhuis said: “We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers. Our competitive strength is the combination of hub and carrier [KLM]. It’s only possible to have a high proportion of transfer traffic if you make transfers as easy as possible. The airport has been designed to the specifications of KLM.”

Elbers conceded: “A third runway at Heathrow would impact our business.” But he put this down to the potential impact of increased charges at Heathrow to pay for runway construction.

“Heathrow is already not a cheap airport,” said Elbers. “We have discussions about the potential impact on the cost of operations. We will follow closely what happens.”

However, Elbers does not foresee a reduction in KLM’s operations at Heathrow even if KLM passengers have to pay higher charges to finance the airport’s expansion. He said: “We would be keen to have more slots at Heathrow. People will always go to London.”

Elbers pointed out that Schiphol could not expand unrestrictedly. “We have five runways and we are happy with that, but it does not mean we can do what we want,” he said.

“There are restrictions on the hours of the day we can operate, on the runways we can use at certain times and in certain weather.

“We have our challenges, mainly with the reduction of environmental impacts. There are potential limitations on the growth of Schiphol. They are political and environmental limitations, not physical, based on noise and pollution.”

Elbers was speaking this week as KLM launched a three-times-a-week service from Amsterdam to Bogota and Cali in Colombia.

http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/Articles/2015/04/02/53719/big-interview-schiphol-unfazed-by-london-airport-expansion.html

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See also

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to reduce number flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59.  They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral.  The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead.  The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges.  Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

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Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to deter passengers flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59.  They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral.  The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead.  The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges.  Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.
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Heathrow to cut domestic charges by a third

2 April 2015 (BBC)

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic and European passengers

Heathrow airport plans to cut the fee it charges airlines for passengers travelling to other UK destinations by a third from next year.

The move would reduce the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 in a bid to boost regional connections to Britain’s busiest airport.

The airport is also proposing raising environmental charges to encourage cleaner, quieter planes.

Heathrow serves just seven regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990.

Charges for passengers flying to European destinations will also be cut by £5 to £24.59.

The airport hoped the reductions, which would take effect on 1 January 2016, would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of limited capacity.

Airlines are not obliged to pass on the savings to passengers but it is expected that many would.

John Holland-Kaye, chief executive of Heathrow, said: “Our proposal to cut passenger charges by a third for domestic services will help us continue to drive the tourism, exports, inbound tourism and foreign direct investment that supports economic growth across the whole of the UK.”

New domestic destinations

The review of charges is part of the airport’s attempt to keep existing domestic routes commercially attractive to airlines and meet the recommendations of the National Connectivity Taskforce [a body set up by Heathrow, paid for by it, and recommending changes that benefit Heathrow. AW note].

Last month, the airport pledged to open more routes to domestic destinations if it is allowed to expand and build a third runway. New routes could include Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Edinburgh is one of the few regional airports to remain connected with Heathrow.

According to Heathrow, 1.7 million passengers connecting with long-haul flights in Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Paris or Dubai could potentially be persuaded do so through the London airport if charges were reduced.

It also plans to alter the minimum departure charge for all flights, which currently stands at £1,406.

The proposals mean that airlines would have to pay a minimum of £1,268.40 per flight, £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations.

Heathrow reviews its charging structure every five years. The final schedule will be announced in August.

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Analysis: Douglas Fraser, BBC Scotland business and economy editor

Heathrow’s bosses concede that they’ve lost ground in short-haul UK and European flights, while the scarcity of landing slots has pushed airlines to use them for more lucrative long-haul flights.

In the past 25 years, Heathrow’s UK and Crown Dependency links are down from 18 destinations to only seven. Other London airports and rail offer alternatives, but that can be inconvenient for outbound passengers, and a blockage for inbound travellers who might otherwise visit other parts of the UK.

While Northern Irish links with London are almost all by plane, 69% of travellers between Scotland and London go by air. Yet there is no Heathrow link to Inverness.

Only BA links Heathrow to Glasgow, and Little Red, part of Virgin Atlantic, is to ground its links to Edinburgh and Aberdeen in September, leaving British Airways without competition. Meanwhile, smaller airports are closing or need government support without London links, including Blackpool, Newquay, Plymouth, Prestwick and Dundee.

The new charging regime, if implemented, would provide a financial signal to help maintain the shorter spokes in to the Heathrow hub. It would also help Heathrow’s argument that it is good for the UK as a whole, as it fights for permission to build another runway.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-32163676.


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Also Telegraph article

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/transport/11512187/Heathrow-plans-to-cut-passenger-charges-to-boost-Britain.html


 

Heathrow airport to increase charges for noisy, polluting aircraft

Some fares should fall in move to boost domestic traffic and provide incentives for airlines to fly cleaner and quieter planes

2.4.2014 (Guardian)

Heathrow is planning to cut charges for airlines flying domestic routes from the London hub airport by a third and will make up the shortfall by increasing the charges attached to noise and pollution.

The airport hopes the move will provide more incentive for airlines to fly cleaner and quieter planes.

Some fares should fall as Heathrow is proposing to give a £10 discount to the average £29.59 per passenger charge for domestic flights, although the charges are levied on airlines rather than customers so are not necessarily passed on.

Only seven domestic routes now operate out of Heathrow, compared with 18 in 1990, and the airport hopes to reverse the decline and prove its worth as a national hub airport with domestic connections as it seeks to win approval for a third runway. About 7% of its 73.2 million passengers each year fly on domestic routes.

Environmental charges on the dirtiest, noisiest aircraft will increase, with a doubling of the tariff attached to nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. The noisiest planes will face a trebling in charges to £9,000 per landing, although fewer than 1% of flights fall into this category.

Overall airport charges are capped by the regulator, the Civil Aviation Authority, so the changes, to take effect in January 2016 after consultation with airlines, will be revenue-neutral.

The discount for UK flights will help Heathrow avoid losing more traffic to other EU hub airports, with increasing numbers of passengers now flying from UK regional airports to places such as Schiphol for long-haul connections. Heathrow will also cut charges by £5 for passengers departing to European destinations.

Heathrow’s chief executive, John Holland-Kaye, said: “We’re serious when we say Heathrow is committed to making sure that businesses across Britain can benefit from the connections to growth markets that only the UK’s hub can provide, while incentivising only the quietest and cleanest planes to operate from Heathrow.

“Our proposal to cut passenger charges by a third for domestic services will help us continue to drive the tourism, exports, inbound tourism and foreign direct investment that supports economic growth across the whole of the UK.”

The Airports Commission will give its recommendation on whether an extra runway should be built at either Heathrow or Gatwick shortly after the general election.

A Gatwick spokesperson said: “Gatwick has the best regional links of any Londonairport and still remains significantly cheaper than Heathrow.”

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/apr/02/heathrow-airport-to-increase-charges-for-noisy-polluting-aircraft

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Heathrow Airport Cutting Fees for Domestic Passengers

2.4.2015 (Travel Pulse)

Heathrow Airport in London has a vision and has a plan, and unlike other companies with visions and plans that end up costing the public, this one might actually save some Brits some money.

The airport plans to cut the passenger fee from 30 euros to 20 euros for anyone who flies domestically in a bid to boost more flights within the U.K, not to mention some homegrown tourism, according to the London Telegraph.

According to the paper, the airport believes more affordable domestic flights are not only good for passengers, but will make the seven routes being offered – Leeds Bradford, Belfast City, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Newcastle – more viable for regional airports that find themselves in a quandary between choosing an overseas flight or a domestic flight for their limited takeoff slots.

Even better, to make up the difference, Heathrow has no plans to pass the costs on to international travelers. Instead, the paper noted, Heathrow will raise fees on the noisiest and most polluting airlines, which it hopes will encourage companies to use more environmentally friendly planes.

John Holland-Kaye, Heathrow chief executive, told the Telegraph that the airport is “serious when we say Heathrow is committed to making sure that businesses across Britain can benefit from the connections to growth markets that only the U.K.’s hub can provide, while incentivizing only the quietest and cleanest planes to operate from Heathrow. Our proposal to cut passenger charges by a third for domestic services will help us continue to drive the tourism, exports, inbound tourism and foreign direct investment that supports economic growth across the whole of the U.K.”

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See earlier:

Schiphol airport unfazed by prospect of new London runway – many UK passengers prefer transferring from Schiphol

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis, described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”. Schiphol now handles up to 8 million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights. Schiphol believes passengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a 3rd runway. 13 UK airports have services to Amsterdam and this will rise to 14 next month, with the addition of Belfast.  The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in Heathrow’s lobbying for a new runway, wanting to prevent the loss of customers to Schiphol. And wanting to keep on being the biggest international airport, by far, in Europe.  Jos Nijhuis said: “We are London’s second hub and doing very well. …I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three….We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers.” KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside.” He felt higher charges needed by Heathrow to pay for a new runway would mean the runway would not reduce the traffic going via Schiphol.

Click here to view full story…

Heathrow would spend £10 million to increase some domestic flights, only if granted a 3rd runway, to get backing from regions

Heathrow has increasingly cut the number of flights to UK regional airports, as it has become more uneconomic for the airlines to run them – and long haul international routes are more profitable. But Heathrow is aware that it needs to get the backing of regional airports, in order to lobby to be allowed a 3rd runway. Heathrow therefore suggested the setting up of a National Connectivity Task Force. In order to boost flights to the regions, Heathrow now says that – only IF it gets a new runway – it will spend £10 million on for the development of 5 new domestic routes, for 3 years. These would include Newquay, Humberside and Liverpool. That would be in addition to the 4 extra routes that easyJet has said it wants to operate if there is a Heathrow runway, to Inverness, Belfast International, the Isle of Man and Jersey. There are currently 6 domestic routes from Heathrow (Leeds Bradford, Belfast City, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Newcastle). Heathrow also said it would launch a review of its airport charges in the coming weeks to focus on making domestic flights more commercially attractive (cheaper) to airlines. The results of this consultation, which is not dependent upon getting a new runway, will be effective from January 2016.

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Flybe to start “up to 3 flights per day” between Liverpool and Schiphol for links to destinations across the world

Regional airline Flybe will be starting flights between Liverpool and Schiphol (Amsterdam) from September 7th 2015. From Schiphol, passengers can transfer to a range of long haul destinations, avoiding having to fly to Heathrow in order to transfer. There will be up to three flights per day.  The airport says: “Details of which airlines passengers will be able to connect onwards with will be announced shortly, but flights are expected to coincide with onward connections at Amsterdam to destinations such as New York, Bangkok, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Shanghai and Toronto.”  Interlining is crucial to the route’s success.  Re-establishing the link to Amsterdam is a cause for celebration for the airport, which was dismayed when KLM, withdrew its Schiphol connection in 2012 following a cull of its route network. Liverpool airport hopes the Schiphol link would benefit Merseyside and North Wales travellers who want to connect with the rest of the world, for business. As well as making it easier for Brits to fly abroad on leisure trips, it might encourage inwards tourism too. Heathrow has offered to spend money getting links with Liverpool, and now Gatwick is trying to as well.… to avoid the business going to Schiphol.

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Liverpool John Lennon Airport secures new flight link to destinations across the world

31.3.2015 (Liverpool Echo)
By Tony McDonough

Regional airline Flybe will connect Liverpool to global hub at Amsterdam Schiphol from September 7th.

….Liverpool airport press release here …..

Liverpool John Lennon Airport (LJLA) last night revealed it is re-establishing its hub link with Amsterdam – connecting it to destinations across the world.

From September 7, regional airline Flybe will offer up to three flights a day from LJLA to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, departing early morning, lunchtime and late afternoon.

Details of which airlines passengers will be able to connect onwards with will be announced shortly, but flights are expected to coincide with onward connections at Amsterdam to destinations such as New York, Bangkok, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Shanghai and Toronto.

The new service will add to Flybe’s existing Liverpool departures to the Isle of Man and Belfast City, with the airline operating 120 weekly flights to and from Liverpool. Re-establishing the link to Amsterdam is a cause for celebration for bosses at LJLA who were dismayed when Dutch airline, KLM, withdrew its Schiphol hub connection in 2012 following a cull of its route network.
The airport believed that, at the time, the route was just starting to gather momentum.

A hub connection not only benefits Merseyside and North Wales travellers who want to connect with the rest of the world, but also gives a huge boost to the Liverpool city region’s visitor economy, making easier for tourists from across the world to come here.

It will also mean Merseyside is a more attractive option to companies looking to invest in or relocate to the region.

The announcement was last night welcomed by Liverpool’s elected Mayor, Joe Anderson, who said: “Our ambition is to make Liverpool a national and international destination for visitors and investors alike.

“The route to future markets depends on our connectivity, so re-establishing the connection to Amsterdam opens up a vital gateway to our future prosperity.”

Crucial to the success of the route is what is called “interlining”. This is where passengers can simply walk onto their connecting onward flight without having to check in their luggage a second time.

Liverpool John Lennon Airport chief executive Andrew Cornish.Liverpool John Lennon Airport chief executive Andrew Cornish.
Andrew Cornish, chief executive of LJLA, said: “The importance of this route should not be underestimated and this is a big commitment by Flybe. Their decision to connect with flights at Amsterdam will open up global access to and from the Liverpool city region.

“As well as giving business and leisure passengers the convenience of being able to their start long-haul journeys from their home airport, it will also bring a further boost for the region’s tourism offer and inward investment opportunities.”

Exeter-based Flybe operates 180 routes to 65 European airports, carrying more than 7m passengers a year, and is Europe’s largest regional airline. Launched in 1979, it was once owned by steel tycoon, Jack Walker, who also owned Blackburn Rovers FC.

The carrier’s chief commercial officer, Paul Simmons, added: “Flybe is delighted to play a part in making it possible for Liverpool customers to access the world through Amsterdam and, just as importantly, make it easier for the rest of the world to come to Liverpool.

“The airline already has a number of codeshare and interline arrangements with long haul carriers that in the future has the potential to benefit passengers even further.”

The news was also welcomed by Liverpool & Sefton Chambers of Commerce chief executive, Jenny Stewart, who said: “This announcement will open up excellent opportunities for business travel to new export markets.”

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/business/liverpool-john-lennon-airport-secures-8950377

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Earlier:

Flybe accuses Gatwick of ignoring UK regions

Saad Hammad, the chief executive of Flybe, has criticised Gatwick for failing to address the needs of Britain’s regions, in its attempt to win support for its second runway. The head of the UK’s biggest regional airline said that Heathrow had been “more specific about what they are going to do” on take-off and landing slots and on charges for domestic flights and “I don’t think Gatwick has been as sensitive as we would like…. Heathrow has one up on Gatwick in terms of listening to regional needs and requirements.” Heathrow has said it would look at cutting charges for regional flights as part of a regular review of fees, though no binding commitment has been made. These cuts are largely to deter passengers flying via Schiphol or other European hubs, rather than concern for the regional airports. Flybe has no flights into Heathrow and only one from Gatwick to Newquay. It sold 25 pairs of slots to easyJet in 2013. A spokesman for Gatwick said that it had the “best” regional links of any London airport and would remain significantly cheaper than Heathrow, even if Heathrow reduced their domestic fees. Gatwick said it is planning to give details of its proposals on fees further later this month. It has claimed its landing charges would not rise above £15 per passenger, but only it gets a 2nd runway and Government agrees a contract not to allow any other runway in the south east for 30 years ….

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Gatwick rushes to offer money – if it gets a 2nd runway – to support and incentivise new domestic air services

After Heathrow got itself some good publicity in its runway campaign, by saying it would spend £10 million to set up some new regional routes, Gatwick has been panicked into doing the same. It appears to have had to rush out a paper, stating it will spend £20 million over 10 years to strengthen domestic air services. Only if it gets a second runway. The paper setting out its plan contains little text, and gives no references or sources for the figures it uses. Gatwick says it already serves 11 destinations within the UK compared with 7 at Heathrow. Gatwick says its plans for a 2nd runway will “encourage the growth of regional airports and the development of international services outside London and the South East” though it does not explain how. It probably means that if there are more long haul flights from an expanded Heathrow, there would be less market demand for these flights from regional airports, and they would thus suffer (which is true). Following what Heathrow has already offered, Gatwick says it will consult on reducing landing charges for regional flights. If Gatwick wasn’t so busy lobbying around Heathrow, and with negative campaigning about Heathrow, it might have thought of some of these ideas for itself, rather than just being a pastiche of Heathrow.

Click here to view full story…

Schiphol airport unfazed by prospect of new London runway – many UK passengers prefer transferring from Schiphol

Schiphol Group president and chief executive Jos Nijhuis, described Amsterdam as “London’s second hub”. Schiphol now handles up to 8 million UK passengers a year, 60% of whom connect to onward flights. Schiphol believes passengers from UK regional airports will continue to choose Amsterdam rather than Heathrow to connect to long‑haul flights, even if Heathrow gets a 3rd runway. 13 UK airports have services to Amsterdam and this will rise to 14 next month, with the addition of Belfast.  The loss of UK regional traffic to Amsterdam because of capacity constraints at Heathrow has featured heavily in Heathrow’s lobbying for a new runway, wanting to prevent the loss of customers to Schiphol. And wanting to keep on being the biggest international airport, by far, in Europe.  Jos Nijhuis said: “We are London’s second hub and doing very well. …I tell [Heathrow chief executive] John Holland-Kaye: ‘Consider our most western runway as yours. We can rename it Heathrow Runway Three….We are a much better transfer airport [than our rivals]. We designed the airport for transfers.” KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers said: “I don’t think additional capacity in London would make Heathrow more attractive than Schiphol to passengers in Newcastle or Humberside.” He felt higher charges needed by Heathrow to pay for a new runway would mean the runway would not reduce the traffic going via Schiphol.

Click here to view full story…

Heathrow to reduce charges on domestic flights from £29.59 to £19.59 from Ist Jan 2016 – to deter passengers flying via Schiphol etc

Heathrow plans to cut the fees it charges airlines for domestic passengers. It says that from 1st January 2016 it will reduce the minimum departure charge for all flights (currently £1,406) to £1,268.40 per domestic flight. It will also cut the charge from £29.59 to £19.59 per passenger, in a bid to increase the number of passengers flying between UK regional airports and Heathrow. Heathrow serves just 7 regional destinations, down from 18 in 1990. It hopes the lower charges on domestic routes would encourage fuller planes and make more efficient use of the limited number of slots for regional flights, which are less profitable for airlines than long haul flights. Heathrow also says it will reduce minimum charges per plane to £1,592.15 for EU flights and £2,689.82 for non-EU destinations. It will also cut the per passenger charge for passengers flying to European destinations by £5 to £24.59. They plan instead to charge more for the noisiest planes, and those that emit more NOx – with the overall changes revenue neutral. The aim is discouraging passengers flying via European airports like Schiphol, and using Heathrow instead. The environmental fees would rise from being 21% to being 28% of total airport charges. Heathrow also say that, if they get a 3rd runway, they would open 5 new domestic routes, including Humberside, Newquay and Liverpool.

Click here to view full story…

Heathrow would spend £10 million to increase some domestic flights, only if granted a 3rd runway, to get backing from regions

Heathrow has increasingly cut the number of flights to UK regional airports, as it has become more uneconomic for the airlines to run them – and long haul international routes are more profitable. But Heathrow is aware that it needs to get the backing of regional airports, in order to lobby to be allowed a 3rd runway. Heathrow therefore suggested the setting up of a National Connectivity Task Force. In order to boost flights to the regions, Heathrow now says that – only IF it gets a new runway – it will spend £10 million on for the development of 5 new domestic routes, for 3 years. These would include Newquay, Humberside and Liverpool. That would be in addition to the 4 extra routes that easyJet has said it wants to operate if there is a Heathrow runway, to Inverness, Belfast International, the Isle of Man and Jersey. There are currently 6 domestic routes from Heathrow (Leeds Bradford, Belfast City, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Newcastle). Heathrow also said it would launch a review of its airport charges in the coming weeks to focus on making domestic flights more commercially attractive (cheaper) to airlines. The results of this consultation, which is not dependent upon getting a new runway, will be effective from January 2016.

Click here to view full story…

 

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