Gatwick sets up a “Noiselab” website, so people can see more about its plane noise

Gatwick airport realises the increased impact of the noise from its planes is causing considerable upset, anger and opposition. As part of its PR offensive, to try to persuade people that it is going everything possible to minimise noise and take people’s complaints (“concerns” in Gatwick language) seriously, it has launched a website called “Noiselab” as a noise monitoring tool. The aim is to allow people to look at the noise close to various monitors and see how much is from aircraft, how many flights etc.  It does not appear that many of these noise monitors are new. The noise level readings at the various monitoring points are only given as averaged LAeq values over a 16-hour day and a 8-hour night. This averaging process destroys the usefulness of this tool as a measure of noise annoyance, especially under flight paths. What people hear is the noise level (LAmax) of each aircraft. The “fly-over” average also reduces the actual noise nuisance, and there is no measure of background noise levels (LA90) against which each aircraft noise event is clearly heard. However the network of monitors should be welcomed because they could be put to proper use, for example if LAmax measurements were taken and the N70 metric [this means the number of noise events noisier than 70dB] was used and the “fly-over” value was given as a Sound Exposure Level (SEL).
.

 

Gatwick Airport launches noise monitoring tool

30.12.2015 (BBC)

Gatwick noise labImage copyrightWilliam Boyack

People living and working under Gatwick Airport flight paths are being given the chance to monitor noise from planes with the launch of an online tool.

The Noise Lab provides up-to-date information using live data from a network of on-the-ground sound monitors to produce community noise reports.

Gatwick Airport said it had been modelled on a similar tool introduced by Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam.

Spokesman Tom Denton said it would help to “better understand” noise concerns.

“This noise lab provides up-to-date flight tracking information which will help us to more accurately monitor concerns and, in time, consider options for further noise mitigation measures. [Lovely the way airports always call complaints or genuine upset from noise “concerns.”  Typical greenwash word.  AW comment]

“We recognise aircraft noise is a real problem for some people and we are determined to do what we can to minimise the amount we generate and mitigate against its effects,” he said. [Everything short of actually reducing it, or preventing its growth as numbers of flights grow. Everything that costs Gatwick and airlines nothing, or inconveniences them in any way. AW comment]

‘Lives blighted’

Sally Pavey, chairman of Communities Against Gatwick Noise Emissions (CAGNE), welcomed any steps that would help residents but said their lives were still being affected by aircraft noise.

“Gatwick Airport is not addressing the real cause of the issue, which is the concentrated flight paths introduced in May last year,” she said.

There are an average of 350 daily take-offs from Gatwick’s single runway. [There were 254,542 Gatwick Air Transport Movements in 2014. That comes to an average of 697 per day. And the number was higher in 2015. Link  AW comment]

Earlier this year, Ms Pavey joined other groups from across the South East to deliver a protest letter to the government about increased noise from Gatwick should a second runway be approved, saying tens of thousands of people had already had their lives blighted.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-35198645

.

The monitoring tool is not very easy to use !

.

Map below shows the locations of the noise monitors  http://noiselab.casper.aero/lgw/#page=databrowser

Location of the Gatwick sound monitors

http://noiselab.casper.aero/lgw/#menu=n_meetposten/page=nmt_70/target=subcontent has more data on each of the noise monitors. (Some is historic, some live)


 

You can put in the dates you want to look at and the corresponding noise and number of flights. For example for all of August:

Gatwick flights in August 2015

Looking at the CAA data, there were  27,089 flights for August in total using Gatwick.
That comes to 873 flights per day on average at Gatwick in August 2015 – that means about 436 take offs per day, on average.
But the Gatwick figures for the numbers of planes on its flight paths – on the image above – come to  230 take offs.  For 24 hours.   Not a total of 436.
So where are other 206 flights going?   Why are they not included?

Comment from an AirportWatch member, who is a noise expert:

Looking at this Gatwick Noise Lab monitoring tool, the noise level readings at the various monitoring points are only given as averaged LAeq values. The first value is given for the average level of a “fly-over” which is generally in the order of about 30 seconds (some less, some more).

The second value is given as an average level over a 16-hour day and a 8-hour night.

In my view, this averaging process completely destroys the usefulness of this tool as a measure of noise annoyance, especially under flight paths.

The 16-hour and 8-hour average LAeq values as a metric to assess noise annoyance and sleep disturbance are wholly inadequate – as we know.

What people hear is the noise level (LAmax) of each aircraft.

The “fly-over” average also reduces the actual noise nuisance – by the averaging process – and there is no measure of background noise levels (LA90) against which each aircraft noise event is clearly heard.

[When assessing environmental noise it is generally useful to establish what is the general or “background” noise level in the area; this is best represented by the LA90 (also written dBA L90 or L90 dB(A) ), which is the level exceeded for the 90% of the time under consideration. Such measurements are designated say 36.7 dBA LA90 or 36.7 LA90. Typical daytime background noise levels range from 18 LA90 in a remote rural areas, through 30 to 40 LA90 in “typical” or “quiet” suburban areas, to 50 to 60 LA90 for busy urban areas.  AW comment]

However the network of monitors should be welcomed because they could be put to proper use.

It would be much more useful if LAmax measurements were taken and the N70 metric [this means the number of noise events noisier than 70dB] was used and the “fly-over” value was given as a Sound Exposure Level (SEL). [SEL is the logarithmic measure of the A-weighted , Sound Pressure Level squared and integrated over a stated period of time or event, relative to a reference sound pressure value. The units are the decibel (dBA).]

The SEL measure accounts for both the duration and intensity of the noise and the SEL metric has the added advantage of complementing the N70 type metric.

And finally the LA90 background noise levels must be used. All these metrics are standard in even the simplest of acoustic monitors. And these monitors also measure using C-weighting which would more closely match aircraft noise characteristics with large low frequency content.

And it’s worth observing that the peak noise level comparison chart in the Gatwick Noise Lab shows the loudest level at 130dB (for a pneumatic drill). What it omitted to say is that 130dB is the threshold of pain and 120dB is the threshold of discomfort and that an aircraft at 50 metres away emits 140dB – twice as loud as the threshold of pain.


Gatwick’s press release

Gatwick launches UK’s first community noise lab

29/12/2015

Gatwick says:

•         Innovative noise lab provides up to date information on aircraft noise
•         Clearer picture of emerging trends to help with longer-term noise mitigation
•         Developed with community in mind

Gatwick Airport has launched the UK’s first community noise lab – an innovative and interactive online tool designed to help local people more accurately monitor aircraft noise.

The new noise lab is modelled on a similar tool introduced by Schiphol Airport – the first of its kind in the world – and provides members of the public with better overflight information. It is hoped this will provide a clearer picture of emerging trends and help with the development of longer-term noise mitigation measures.

The new tool was developed with input from local council environmental health officers and GATCOM – Gatwick’s Consultative Committee. It uses live data from a network of on-the-ground noise monitors to produce community noise reports.

The innovative tool was developed by Casper, an IT company specialising in the development of real-time location-based monitoring and analysis tools and can be viewed here: http://noiselab.casper.aero/lgw/.

Tom Denton, Gatwick’s Head of Corporate Responsibility, said:

“This noise lab provides up-to-date flight tracking information which will help us to more accurately monitor concerns and, in time, consider options for further noise mitigation measures.

“We recognise aircraft noise is a real problem for some people and we are determined to do what we can to minimise the amount we generate and mitigate against its effects. This lab is just one of a number of measures we’re introducing, to better understand people’s concerns.”  

Gatwick is also pursuing many measures to reduce aircraft noise, including:

  • incentivising airlines by charging them less to use quieter aircraft – almost all (99%) of the aircraft currently using Gatwick are among the quietest types in operation, and
  • employing a continuous descent approach, so aircraft use less thrust by gliding and descending at a continuous rate – generating significantly less noise.

Noise generated by the airport has been steadily reducing, as demonstrated by the land area (noise contour) covered by the loudest noise levels reducing from 94.5km² to 85.6km² in the past six years. Additionally, Gatwick spent £2.35 million on its industry leading noise insulation scheme last year – a 95% take up of the allocated budget – with 730 households signing up to receive £3,600 of acoustic insulation.

 

Notes to Editors

While other UK airports have introduced flight trackers these have a 24 hour delay and do not provide as detailed information on aircraft movements. [This is untrue. Heathrow’s webtrak at http://webtrak5.bksv.com/lhr4 now has just a 20 minute delay. Seems Gatwick has not bothered to check.  AW comment].

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/press-releases/2015/15-12-29-gatwick-launches-uks-first-community-noise-lab.aspx

.

.

.

.

 

 

Read more »

Essays on why we travel, what we get out of it – travel as epic adventure or religious experience …

The growing obsession with travel is apparently induced by very cheap air fares, growing affluence, ever rising expectations, an increasing sense that hypermobility across the globe is an entitlement – on top of an emptiness and dissatisfaction with what everyday life has to offer. In a series of essays, an anthropologist looks at some of the reasons for our globe-trotting, why we do it, and what we get out of it. He considers travel as epic adventure, and how we seek challenges, in our rather mundane lives, over-influenced by health & safety; how we want to substitute novelty for normality; to reverse our daily routines, and abandon the comfort of familiarity. And the quest for ourselves. In looking at travel as a religious experience, he considers the rite of passage of much gap year travel…” some 25,000 visit Thailand, Australia and New Zealand …there is ritual talk: “where are you going?”; “where have you been?”; “did you ‘do’ this monument/trek/natural wonder?” etc.  Drink, drugs and digital photos, sun, sea and social networks … Upon their return from the wilderness, our young vagrants are transformed (or reformed) into worldly-wise Westerners, new sovereign citizens of a global era. (Theirs is the Earth and everything that’s in it!) … Indeed, for many in the West today, overseas travel has come to fill the void vacated by ‘real’ religions, providing meaning, purpose, awe and wonder, as well as a sense of belonging.” 
.

 

 

Travel as Epic Adventure

by David Jobanputra

… one of a series of essays on why we travel …

at http://www.bonanomie.com/category/the-anthropology-of-travel/

…. it is a long article, well worth reading.  But these are a few extracts below …..

In the last article, I set out the idea that travel can serve a quasi-religious function akin to a ritual or pilgrimage.  This week, I want to look at our motivation in a different light.  Rather than viewing travel as a kind of religious experience, it is, I contend, an epic adventure, a journey of discovery whose destination, as Henry Miller once suggested, ‘is never a place but a new way of looking at things’.  Above all else, it affords us a new way of looking at each other, and at ourselves.  More tellingly perhaps, it offers the chance to change what we see, to ‘find’ oneself and fashion it anew.

……

Whatever one says about travel, whatever truths one tries to mine from its representative depths, it is most certainly, literally, an adventure.  Be it two weeks in Malta or two years in Tibet (visa permitting), the act of travel presupposes the same encounter with the unknown that is at the heart of every adventurous undertaking.

……

And as travel is more or less a matter of letting things befall one, of submitting to the new and unfamiliar in the pursuit of pleasure, it is, by definition, an adventure.

So what are these things we allow to befall us?  Which novel events comprise the adventure?  To name but a few of this endless assortment, there are different climates, different foods, different modes of dress.  Often, the language too is unfamiliar, while elsewhere we may encounter disparate laws, singular customs, foreign fauna and strange currencies.

More generally, travel rests on a series of oppositions or inversions in the fabric of everyday life.  Thus, we swap cold weather for warmth, city living for country, fast living for slow, stress for calm and so on, perhaps vice versa.  While the extent of these inversions may vary – not everyone swaps the rat race for an ashram or the Arctic for Arabia – they have in common the essence of adventure, namely, the substitution of novelty for normality.

Why, then, do we take pleasure in reversing our daily routines?  For creatures of habit, as humans are, what is to be gained from abandoning the comfort of familiarity?

Well, the first and most obvious explanation is that the highs justify the lows, which is to say that the unforeseeable pleasures equal or exceed the unforeseeable pains.  So it is, then, that the sunrise trumps the blizzard, the food trumps the filth and so on.

…..

In fact, the epic adventure is less a quest for paradise than a quest for ourselves.  Now this might sound like a clumsy cliché, and granted, it can be unwieldy.  But there is truth to this truism, for in the course of the adventure, in the process of displacing our persons from their usual surrounds, we cannot help but arrive at a fuller conception of our characters.

….

For the vast majority of people, this is arguably the ultimate appeal of travel: it is a means and a medium to know one another, an adventure to be shared.  But what of those who prefer to go solo?  Why the desire to ‘find’ oneself?  And what does this actually mean?

…..

Viewed this way, the desire to travel is inseparable from the desire to appear (i.e. look and feel) like a traveller, just as the need for adventure is synonymous with the need to appear adventurous.  Travel, then, is a brand that helps to define one’s identity.  Like the food we eat, the car we drive and the clothes we wear, it works to confer on us sense of our own individuality.  Nevertheless, like any other product, it is subject to the market and the whims of consumerism.

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-epic-adventure/

.


 

Travel as Religious Experience

by David Jobanputra

… one of a series of essays on why we travel …

at http://www.bonanomie.com/category/the-anthropology-of-travel/

…. it is a long article, well worth reading.  But these are a few extracts below – relating to young people and the semi-ritual travel rites of passage of the gap year …..

 

Let’s think again about the gaggle of gap years sketched out above.  Every year, approximately 100,000 school-leavers head overseas prior to embarking on work or further education.  Many more young people take similar breaks during or after their studies, or in-between jobs.  Among this growing demographic, which is worth an estimated £2.2 billion in the UK alone, there are two major gap year options: project-based trips with organisations such as Global Vision International (GVI) and Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO); or budget backpacking through Asia, Australasia and the Americas.

Of those who opt for the latter, some 25,000 visit Thailand, Australia and New Zealand in the same outing, making this the pre-eminent gap year circuit.  Already, then, we have the first elements of ritual: time and place.

But what else?  Well, for a start you need the costume.  (Rituals, you will recall, work best in garish garb.)  Ponchos, sarongs, fisherman’s pants: practical, yes, but also symbolic.  Like braids, dreadlocks, tattoos and piercings, this decorative dress denotes a departure from everyday life and heightens the sense of occasion. There are other adornments too: the journal; the guidebook; the low-slung knapsack.

And then there is ritual talk: “where are you going?”; “where have you been?”; “did you ‘do’ this monument/trek/natural wonder?”; etc.  Drink, drugs and digital photos, sun, sea and social networks – these too are ubiquitous features.

Travel, then, becomes ritual; there is an order of action, a template to be followed.  Upon their return from the wilderness, our young vagrants are transformed (or reformed) into worldly-wise Westerners, new sovereign citizens of a global era.  (Theirs is the Earth and everything that’s in it!)  Through their reintegration, initiates renew a vow to society.  In return, society bestows on them the mantle of maturity, endorsing their experience as life-changing and morally valid.

….

So there we have it.  What appears a humble waterfront guesthouse is in fact a stage upon which various reverent rites are enacted, be it a kind of coming of age ritual akin to an aboriginal walkabout or the righteous restraint of the shoestring ascetic.  Viewing travel in this light is in no way meant to devalue it – quite the opposite in fact.  While at one level these foreign forays are decidedly frivolous, at another they can be seen to fulfil basic social functions.  Indeed, for many in the West today, overseas travel has come to fill the void vacated by ‘real’ religions, providing meaning, purpose, awe and wonder, as well as a sense of belonging.  As we shall see in the following article, it may also serve to satisfy an ancient appetite for adventure and the itching innate in our figurative feet.

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-religious-experience/

.

..

 

Read more »

Is travel now the ultimate “must-have” possession, used to define who we think we are?

David Jobanputra is an anthropologist and film maker, who has given much thought to why we travel so much. He has looked at travel largely as something rich westerners do, in more exotic lands. But he also asks about travel in the way it has now become a serious consumer product, and one through which we try to define ourselves – sophisticated, trendy, caring, bold, discerning etc. “We choose a personal brand identity to which we aspire and the travel industry supplies us with the right product to match.” …”Consumption is our lifejacket. It is also our straitjacket.” …”We buy status, power, a sense of inclusion. We even buy our adventures. In the age of consumerism, everything is commoditised … including tourism….Transnational travel makes culture a commodity. When the ethic of consumption is extended to new people and places, everything comes with a price. Visit to the palace – $12; mountain trek – $35; traditional dance performance – $8; sense of self-worth – priceless. Today’s holiday brochures boast bargains like an Argos catalogue; instead of homeware and cheap electronics, we find tigers, temples and tribal villages. All are commodities, just the same. We buy these things for the same reason we buy any other non-essential product: to look better, feel better or else appear better.”
.

 

TRAVEL: THE ULTIMATE MUST-HAVE POSSESSION?

In the third of a series of articles exploring why we travel, David Jobanputra asks if our travels are anything more than an act of consumption through which we can define ourselves as we wish. Sophisticated, trendy, caring; we choose a personal brand identity to which we aspire and the travel industry supplies us with the right product to match.

The Apple iPad, Reebok Classics, Sainsbury’s Taste the Difference Aegean tomato and yak cheese focaccia – ours is an age of consumerism. From our first forays to the sweet shop, through birthdays, toy ads and Christmas lists, we are subtly schooled in the art of desire; by the time we reach early adulthood, we are all grandmasters of the craft.

We know what we want, we know how to get it, we know how much it costs. We know why it’s better than its rivals, why Fad magazine gave it 8/10 neighbour’s asses, why Stephen Fry is tweeting about it.

We know what we want. And we know we don’t need it.

Consumption has been called the pre-eminent postmodern act. It’s the means through which we in the West, adrift in a world without meaning, cut loose from nature and history, traverse these troubling times. It is our lifejacket. It is also our straitjacket.

For the first time in history, entire societies are engaged in acts of holistic consumption. We buy not merely what we need to survive, but also what we need (or so it may seem) to ensure a happy existence. And so we buy safety, comfort, beauty and health, learning, leisure and love. We buy status, power, a sense of inclusion. We even buy our adventures.

In the age of consumerism, everything is commoditised. To buy or not to buy, that is the question. Rainforests, footballers, hospital beds – the infectious logic of the market makes products of them all.

And tourism shows no immunity.

Transnational travel makes culture a commodity. When the ethic of consumption is extended to new people and places, everything comes with a price. Visit to the palace – $12; mountain trek – $35; traditional dance performance – $8; sense of self-worth – priceless.

Today’s holiday brochures boast bargains like an Argos catalogue; instead of homeware and cheap electronics, we find tigers, temples and tribal villages. All are commodities, just the same.

We buy these things for the same reason we buy any other nonessential product: to look better, feel better or else appear better.

We are, in effect, cultural cannibals, consuming culture so as to assimilate some aspect of it. Thus, New York confers cosmopolitanism, India spirituality, the Caribbean coolness and so on. And then there are optional extras, side dishes if you like. A five-star hotel suggests status, a wine tour imparts taste, the prefix ‘eco-’ implies ethical acumen. In the realm of the tourist-cannibal, you are what you eat.

And thus, we travel to consume; it’s all that we know how to do. Consumption is our (shop) window on the world, framing our every experience.

Just as once we defined ourselves by what we produced, now it is what we consume.

Consumption, then, is mandatory, involuntary even. And travel is yet another market place. It is the new mall in a small town, with new stores, new brands and new possibilities. And so we buy flights and daytrips and waterproof clothing and rugs and postcards and carved wooden statues and tea and timeshares and tailor-made suits. We buy everything and anything. New malls are opened, new cultures consumed. Supply follows demand.

Supply follows demand, but with a marked dislocation: demand from the West; supply from the Rest. So travel is a form of imperialism, an expansionist project in which vast armies of pleasure-seekers are deployed daily to ‘colonise’ new lands, safe in the knowledge that their motives are sound (the customer is always right). It is to this issue, together with other inadvertent effects of travel, that I dedicate the following articles.

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-consumption/

http://www.tourdust.com/blog/posts/is-travel-anything-more-than-consumerism-in-another-la

.

You can find other articles by David, on aspects of travel and consumerism, at: 

Travel as religious experience:

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-religious-experience/

.

Travel as Epic Adventure

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-epic-adventure/

.

Travel as Imperialism

http://www.bonanomie.com/travel-as-imperialism/

.

…. and there are many more essays …. at  http://www.bonanomie.com/page/2/


 

About David Jobanputra

David Jobanputra is a writer and anthropologist specialising in development, cultural change and environmental ethics. He recently completed a PhD in Social Anthropology at University College London, which looked at grassroots advocacy and eco-development in the Aravalli mountains of Rajasthan, India. In addition to living and working in the subcontinent, David has travelled extensively throughout Europe, Asia and Africa, including overland trips from Tibet to Scotland and Beijing to Java. David recently returned from 18 months living with a tribe in the Rajasthani desert.

 

http://www.tourdust.com/blog/posts/is-travel-anything-more-than-consumerism-in-another-land

.

 

.

.

.

 

..

 

Read more »

John Redwood losing patience with inadequate responses on aircraft noise from John Holland-Kaye

John Redwood, the MP for Wokingham, has been in correspondence with Heathrow’s CEO John Holland-Kaye, about the considerable increase in aircraft noise that his constituents have been subjected to since mid 2014. Mr Holland-Kaye has replied, setting out a long list of possible improvements to how much noise Heathrow flights might produce.  John Redwood replied: “The changes that NATS made, without consultation, in June 2014 to the Compton Gate have resulted in incessant noise over the Wokingham area due to the concentration of flights over one area, rather than their dispersal. The various mitigating effects that you have described to me over the past months appear good in theory but they are having no effect on reducing the noise level above our houses. I have no wish to engage in a continuous dialogue or await some new consultation. What I and my constituents wish to see is a return to the pre-June 2014 dispersal and Gate policies. It is difficult to see why Wokingham would wish to support an expansion of the airport if this matter cannot be put right promptly.” So, roll on the consultation by the CAA this year, and then the other by the DfT, on aircraft noise and airspace change.
.

 

 

Reply to CEO of Heathrow Airport re. aircraft noise

Dear Mr Holland-Kaye

Thank you for your letter of 15 December.

The changes that NATS made, without consultation, in June 2014 to the Compton Gate have resulted in incessant noise over the Wokingham area due to the concentration of flights over one area, rather than their dispersal. The various mitigating effects that you have described to me over the past months appear good in theory but they are having no effect on reducing the noise level above our houses.

I have no wish to engage in a continuous dialogue or await some new consultation. What I and my constituents wish to see is a return to the pre-June 2014 dispersal and Gate policies.

It is difficult to see why Wokingham would wish to support an expansion of the airport if this matter cannot be put right promptly.

Yours sincerely

John Redwood

.


Comment by Tim Henderson
Posted January 2, 2016

It might be worth quoting from the “Operations – Proof of Evidence” HAL.MB.P.1 that the Heathrow team recently submitted to the Planning Inspectors presiding over the recent Appeal Inquiry hearing regarding the works to end the Cranford Agreement.

“3.8.3. Furthermore, the Civil Aviation Authority (Air Navigation) Directions 2001 (as amended), published under Section 66(1) of the Transport Act 2000 set out the circumstances when the CAA must also seek the approval of the Ssecretyary of State for “changes to the design or to the provision of airspace arrangements, or to the use made of them”, namely where those changes would have a significantly detrimental effect on the environment or where they would have a significant effect on the level or distribution of noise and emissions. The Directions included within the definition of “airspace arrangements” “changes to air traffic
control procedures, or to the provision of navigational aids or the use made of them in air
navigation”. It follows that a number of operational changes involving airspace change,
changes to ATC procedures or navigational aids will trigger the involvement of the SofS
and the consideration of environmental information before any decision can be taken on
their implementation.”

Andrew Haines, Chief Executive of CAA, has argued that changes due to NATS vectoring choices are not changes that are subject to the formal Airspace Change Process (see
http://www.gatwickobviouslynot.org/docs/GON_Statement_of_Facts_and_Grounds.pdf)

It is noteworthy that Heathrow does not appear to accept this .


 

Letter from CEO of Heathrow Airport

I have received the following letter from the CEO of Heathrow Airport, addressing the points raised in my conversation with a pilot last month:

The letter from John Holland-Kaye – (presumably dated 15th December?):

Thank you for your letter dated 23rd November.  I am grateful that you continue to engage in a constructive dialogue with us on these important issues.  With regard to the recent conversation you had with a pilot, I would make the following comments in response:

Aircraft altitudes on departure

Heathrow’s departure routes and procedures regarding climb gradients were designed in the 1960s.  As modern aircraft fleets have replaced older technology, we have seen a steady increase in aircraft altitudes.  Indeed, the recent analysis undertaken by independent analysts PA Consulting shows that over the last five years, there has been an upward trend in the altitude of departures over Wokingham. [It would be good if they would publish this data, in comprehensible form, for all to see. AW note]. This is what we would expect with modern aircraft fleets.  However, further improvements beyond this will be limited in the short term because of the airspace constraints that NATS work within.

Heathrow’s airspace is one of the most congested in the world due to:  the proximity of four other major airports (Gatwick, Stansted, City and Luton); the location of the four holding stacks; and the interaction between arriving and departing traffic.  Taken together, these mean that until changes are made to the whole of London’s airspace through the Government’s modernisation programme, it will not be possible to increase further the height of aircraft.

As part of any future changes to climb gradients, the noise impacts of steeper climb gradients will have to be considered.  There will always be trade-offs.  While getting aircraft at greater altitudes more quickly may benefit some, it will also result in increased noise for others. [ie. it is even noisier for those living near the airport, who are already subjected to the worst noise. A benefit?  AW note].

Aircraft altitudes on arrival

The majority of aircraft coming into land at Heathrow already perform what is known as a Continuous Descent Approach or CDA.  This is a procedure aircraft perform after leaving the holding stacks, from approx. 6,000 feet and before they lock onto the final approach (the last 10 miles or so when aircraft line up in a straight line into the airport).  It involves aircraft maintaining a steady angle of approach when landing at the airport, as opposed to stepped approaches which involve prolonged periods of level flight. [And then engine thrust too.  AW note]. 

Continuous Descent Approaches reduce noise because they require less engine thrust and keep the aircraft higher for longer.  Some 87% of arriving aircraft currently use CDA at Heathrow.

In order to achieve the objective of keeping aircraft higher before they reach the final approach, there are a number of ways this might be possible in future.  The first is to introduce a steeper final approach angle, which would mean aircraft approach the airport at a higher altitude.  Currently the approach angle of the final approach (known as the Instrument Landing System) is set at 3 degrees.  This means that depending on the point that aircraft join it, they will be at a set height from touchdown.  We are currently trialing a slightly steeper approach with a view to increasing it further in the future.  [This omits to say the steeper angle is only 3.2 degrees, which makes virtually no difference, and is largely for PR purposes. AW note].

We are also investigating the feasibility of what are called ‘segmented approaches’.  A two-segmented approach adopts an intermediate approach phase flown at a steeper angle, before transitioning back to a standard 3 degree approach.  This would potentially provide noise benefits further out during the approach phase, without affecting the final approach phase.

Diverging flightpaths

Aside from the procedural change that NATS made in 2014 to the Compton route, which has meant more flights over areas in the Wokingham area, there have not been amendments to procedures that change the way aircraft are directed.

For areas closer to Heathrow, improvements [meaning technical advances. AW note]  in aircraft navigational technology has meant there is a trend for aircraft to be more concentrated with the established departure routes. [By improvements, he means that GPS-type technology enables planes to navigate more accurately – it has not meant any improvement to those living under the newly concentrated routes. AW note].

In areas further away from the airport, including areas in your constituency, the independent analysis shows that there is still a degree of natural dispersal once aircraft are over 4,000 feet (the point that they can leave the departure route).  Nevertheless, it confirms that there has been an overall increase in aircraft numbers passing over the area which will account for the increased over flight some people experience.  [No explanation is given of why there are now greater numbers. Heathrow is, in theory, almost “full”.  AW note].

Our view is that in planning future airspace changes, the industry should explore how new precision technology could be used to create alternating departure routes that would provide period of predictable respite from noise for residents. [Is there evidence that this is what people over flown actually want?  Has research been done?  AW note].  Currently aviation policy [DfT policy. AW note]  favours concentration over dispersal, although we understand that, as part of a consultation on airspace policy next year, it will seek views as to whether this is still the right approach.  It will be important that you and others make your views known during this process.

Arrivals management

Regarding better planning of arrivals, NATS has just adopted a new operational procedure – known as ‘XMAN’ – that cuts the amount of time that aircraft circle in holding stacks.  This is done by slowing down traffic in their en-route phase when delays are anticipated on arrival.

Traditionally NATS has only been able to influence an arriving aircraft’s approach to Heathrow once it enters UK airspace – sometimes only 80 miles from the airport.  This limits the opportunity to manage the flow of traffic and can result in additional time spent in the holding stacks. [Bearing mind the location of Wokingham, this seems to be irrelevant to Mr Redwood’s constituents’ problem.  link   AW note].

Under the XMAN system, if delays in the Heathrow holding stacks begin to build, air traffic controllers in the Netherlands, France, Scotland and Ireland are asked to slow down aircraft up to 350 miles away from London to help minimize delays on arrival.  Absorbing delay in the en-route phase, when aircraft are higher and more efficient, saves fuel and CO2 while minimising noise for the communities living beneath the stacks.

I would be happy to meet to discuss these issues in more detail.

Yours sincerely

John Holland-Kaye

Chief Executive Officer.


This was an earlier letter:

Letter from Chief Executive of Heathrow Airport about noise

Dear Mr Redwood

Thank you for the constructive meeting last month. It was useful to discuss some of the issues raised by the recent Airports Commission recommendation as well as the airport’s operations today and how we can be a better neighbour to your constituents.

I am grateful for the constructive manner in which you have raised a number of important issues on behalf of your constituents. As a consequence of our engagement with you and other local Members of Parliament, Heathrow has developed a Blueprint for Noise Reduction which aims to address many of the concerns you have raised over the past 12 months. These are set out in the briefing paper I’ve attached.

At our meeting, we discussed the Government’s Future Airspace Strategy which seeks to make fundamental improvements to airspace structures in the longer term. The modernisation of airspace creates the potential to restructure airspace to reflect the capabilities of today’s modern aircraft. This will address some of the more significant changes to you want to see, including increasing aircraft altitudes on departure. Although these structural changes are a few years away, in the meantime, we will continue to work with NATS and the airlines to find innovative solutions to managing noise and continuing to reduce Heathrow’s noise footprint.

I will ensure that you are kept fully informed about any future trails or proposed changes to flight paths. Your continued input into this process would be very welcome.

Kind regards

Yours sincerely

John Holland-Kaye
Chief Executive Officer

 

Briefing for Rt Hon John Redwood, MP for Wokingham – Aircraft noise, Heathrow

Blueprint for Noise Reduction

Heathrow’s Blue print for Noise Reduction is a list of practical steps to reduce the impact of operations at the airport today on those living under flightpaths around the airport.  It was developed following engagement with local politicians and in response to concerns raised by local residents.

The relevant commitments Heathrow have made that will improve the noise climate for residents in Wokingham include:

Continuous Descent Approach

Aircraft approach airports in two stages.  The first part, which happens over areas such as Wokingham on easterly operations, is as aircraft make their way from the holding stacks to the final approach.  Pilots can make this stage less noisy by descending at a steady rate in what’s known as a continuous descent approach (CDA).  The alternative – coming down in steps with periods of level flying in between – is noisier because aircraft fly at low altitudes for longer.

The use of CDA has been increasing over the last few years and over the past 12 months Heathrow has been working with those airlines that perform below average.  This has seen some very encouraging results and last month saw the best ever performance of CDA with 89% of all arrivals at Heathrow using this procedure.  This is benefitting the Wokingham area by keeping these aircraft higher for longer.

Fitting Quiet Technology to A320s

The Airbus A320 family of aircraft accounts for 55 to 60% of the aircraft that use Heathrow.  They’re efficient aircraft but they emit a distinctive high pitched whistling sound when the aircraft are about 10 to 25 miles from touchdown, over areas such as Wokingham.  It’s now possible to retrofit a component that reduces the noise from each aircraft by around 6 decibels.

I have written to the Chief Executives of all airlines operating the A320 into Heathrow, encouraging them to adopt the new technology.  Some have already done so and 80% of the fleet is expected to be retrofitted in the next 18 months.

Early Phase-out of the Noisiest Planes

Some aircraft are noisier than others.  The oldest and noisiest are classified as ‘Chapter 3’ aircraft.  Airlines already pay ten times more to fly Chapter 3 planes to Heathrow than they pay for the quietest aircraft.  Although the number of ‘Chapter 3’ aircraft in use at Heathrow is decreasing each year, based on last year’s movements there are still around 3,600 of these aircraft which we know are disruptive to residents.

Heathrow aims to become the first large European airport to be completely free of ‘Chapter 3’ aircraft and we are working with the airlines that still use these aircraft to encourage an early phase-out.  We will be able to report progress against this later this year.

Late Running Aircraft

The last scheduled flight of the day leaves its stand at 22.50.  For a variety of reasons aircraft may leave later, which can be very disruptive for local communities.  Sometimes late departures are unavoidable.  We are working with NATS to reduce operational bottlenecks that lead to delays and late flights.

We are keeping a record of all late-departing aircraft so that we can track the least punctual airlines and are working with the airlines that run late most often to help them keep to schedule.

Segmented Approaches

While not officially included in the Blueprint, we have been working with British Airways to explore the concept of ‘segmented approaches’ which potentially offer additional noise benefits, particularly for communities further away from the airport such as the Wokingham area.

Segmented approaches are where the aircraft has an initial steeper approach path before transitioning to a lower angle for the final approach to the runway.  For example, this might be going from 4.5 degrees to 3 degrees.  This would mean aircraft would be higher over Wokingham than is the case today.

http://johnredwoodsdiary.com/2015/08/26/letter-from-chief-executive-of-heathrow-airport/

.

.

.

Read more »

Richard Branson wants to fuel his expensive joy-riding “Virgin Galactic” on biofuels ….

Richard Branson is still planning is “Virgin Galactic” so some very rich travellers can be whisked up to edge of space, experience weightless for a short time, and then fly back down again.  Some very expensive joy-riding.  And now he is hoping that his passengers won’t have to have any qualms of conscience about the carbon emissions generated by their (pointless) trip. So he is hoping to fuel his planes with biofuel. Quite which biofuel he does not say – probably because there is no fuel that would actually be properly sustainable. If there was such a fuel, it would have to not compete with other crops for land, water or fertiliser; it would have to not compete for space with wildlife and natural habitats; and it would have to have only minimal impacts on aspects of the environment, such as soil structure.  If such a fuel could magically be found (there is no far no such crop in prospect) there is no obvious reason why it should be used to ferry the very rich off on a “bragging-rights” trip – it could be better used for land based vehicles, such as fire engines or ambulances etc. Branson is still hoping to form a base for Virgin Galactic in the UK. He tries to defend his space plans, saying they could eventually lead to a new form of intercontinental travel for the masses via space.
.

 

Richard Branson reveals Virgin Galactic’s plans for a clean UK ‘spaceport’

3.1.2016
By Steve Connor, Science Editor (Independent)

Sir Richard Branson wants to take paying passengers into space from a “spaceport” in Britain and has promised that the rocket fuel used will be clean enough to ensure no one buying a ticket will feel guilty about damaging the planet.

The 65-year-old entrepreneur said that his company, Virgin Galactic, is back on track to become the first commercial space service – despite the devastating accident in 2014 when SpaceShipTwo disintegrated in a test flight while travelling at 600mph at an altitude of nine miles – killing one of the two test pilots who were on board.

In an exclusive interview with The Independent on Sunday, Sir Richard said that his ambitious goal of establishing the first passenger space operation, from Virgin Galactic’s base in the Mojave Desert in California, now extends to operating from a future spaceport in Britain, which is being considered by the Government.

“Virgin Galactic very much hopes to be one of the principal operators. We are a contender to operate Virgin Galactic out of the British spaceport once it’s chosen,” he said. “I think initially it will be for people going into space and coming back to that spaceport, but, in time, the aim is to go point-to-point.”

Virgin Galactic has been criticised by environmentalists for offering what amounts to expensive joyrides for the super-rich who, for a ticket costing about $250,000 (£170,000), will be able to experience no more than a few minutes of weightlessness while witnessing the curvature of the Earth before descending to the same spaceport in the Mojave from where they took off.

However, Sir Richard defended his space plans on the grounds that they could eventually lead to a new form of intercontinental travel for the masses via space, which he said could be less damaging to the environment than current long-haul flights from potential fuel savings.

“We are doing everything we can to try to work towards turning the world into a place that’s run by clean energy, not dirty energy. We’ve managed to reduce the amount of energy, of carbon output, to get somebody into space … to less than a round-trip, economy class, from London to New York,” he said.

“I suspect, in two to three years, we’ll not be using any carbon output at all for our space programme. All I can say is that we would not want a space programme if we thought it was in any way damaging [to the environment]. We believe space can play a major part in helping the world we live in and getting on top of climate change,” he said.

“I promise you that we will not allow people to feel guilty travelling with us. We will show them we can pioneer clean energy.”

Steve Connor asks:

“Can Sir Richard Branson really offer us rides into space without damaging the planet?

When Sir Richard talks about carbon-neutral space travel, he is alluding to the possibility of cheap biofuels from growing sustainable crops such as marine algae, or using up biological wastes from farming.

In 2008, one of Virgin Atlantic’s jumbo jets flew between London and Amsterdam using a fuel derived from a mixture of Brazilian babassu nuts and coconuts. Sir Richard said the flight marked a “vital breakthrough” for the airline industry’s attempts to go green.

However, only one of the aircraft’s four engines had been converted to using biofuel, which has a tendency to freeze at high altitude if not stored correctly. The technology still has a long way to go.

An equally difficult question hangs over the sustainability of biofuels – as many are made by converting wildlife-rich land. Then there is the question of the impact on food supply caused by converting farmland into industrial biofuel cropping, which could contribute to rising food prices for the world’s poorest. “

Sir Richard said that advances in biofuels, renewable energy and cleaner rocket technologies could make intercontinental space travel a reality – and at a price that ordinary people could afford – without damaging the environment or exacerbating climate change.

The prospect of cleaner, intercontinental space travel was one reason that the Government announced in May a shortlist of aerodromes in the UK that could host a new national spaceport. It has said it would like to see such a spaceport operational by 2018.

Virgin Galactic has put in a bid to operate space planes from the spaceport, Sir Richard said. He is convinced that the costs of space flights will come down and the fuel savings on intercontinental flights using a low Earth orbit will make these point-to-point, long-haul space flights commercially viable.

“Not everybody could fly across the Atlantic in the 1920s. It took pioneering companies to bring the cost of air travel down to a price where enormous numbers of people are able to do it,” Sir Richard said.

“In time, thousands of people will become astronauts and enjoy space travel. And, projecting further forward, Virgin Galactic is building spaceships with wings. We’re in the airline business and we want to start offering point-to-point travel via space,” he said.

“Initially, it won’t be cheap, but it’s possible that the environmental costs will be a fraction of what it currently costs to go on an airplane. We hope the price of point-to-point travel will be realistic, so that a lot of people will be able to experience it. We’re talking of tremendous speeds and spectacular views along the way.”

In February, Virgin Galactic will unveil its new replacement spaceship in the Mojave. There are no major changes in the design compared with the ill-fated SpaceShipTwo, Sir Richard said, except that there will be a fail-safe mechanism to prevent pilots from prematurely engaging the “feathering system” which controls the plane’s descent – the cause of the 2014 disaster.

Sir Richard has invited the theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking to name the new plane at the unveiling. He has already offered the scientist Virgin Galactic’s only free ticket into space – which Professor Hawking has accepted, provided his health allows it.

“Obviously, we had a year’s delay after the accident and it’s tremendous that Stephen Hawking has agreed to come and name the new spaceship,” Sir Richard said.

“He has made it very clear that he thinks mankind and womankind need to work very hard to try to colonise other planets and that space is very important for people back here on Earth,” he said.

“He has spoken in the past about the need for colonising other planets should anything ever happen to people back here on Earth, so that all those years of evolution will not be wasted.

“There is an enormous amount of things that can be done in space, have been done in space, and will be done in space; and I think commercial space travel will play a big role in that.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/richard-branson-virgin-galactics-plans-uk-spaceport-a6794171.html

.


See earlier:

 

Prestwick still set on role as UK spaceport despite Virgin Galactic flight catastrophe

The UK Government  has said the Virgin Galactic crash will not hinder efforts to establish Europe’s first commercial spaceport in the UK, with a likely base in Scotland. SpaceShipTwo broke apart shortly after being released at altitude on 31st October, providing another setback for Richard Branson’s plans. The problem appears to be in the form of rocket used, with nitrous oxide fuel – about which there had been many previous safety warning. One pilot was killed and the other badly injured.  Ailing Prestwick  airport seems desperate to cling to any available straw, so hence the hope of economic resurgence by becoming a spaceport.  Prestwick was shortlisted in July 2014 among 8 potential sites – 6 in Scotland – to locate a launchpad for sub-orbital tourist flights. The plan is ultimately, if anyone wants to risk their lives, for “holidaymakers” to cross the Atlantic from Scotland to New York in around 45 minutes. The latest setback raises more questions about the viability of commercial spaceflight. And that ignores its desirablilty … as about the highest carbon,  unnecessary, activity humans could indulge in. 

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2014/11/prestwick-still-set-on-role-as-uk-spaceport-despite-virgin-galactic-flight-catastrophe/

.


8 sites shortlisted for UK’s first commercial spaceport – Newquay, Llanbedr + 6 in Scotland

At the Farnborough Air Show, plans to build a dedicated launch facility were unveiled. The UK government has expressed its enthusiasm for this unlikely project. Of the sites revealed by he CAA, one site is in England, at Newquay. One site is in Wales at Llanbedr airport in Snowdonia national park. The other six are in Scotland: Campbeltown airport; Prestwick airport; Kinloss barracks; RAF Lossiemouth; RAF Leuchars and Stornoway airport on the Isle of Lewis. Publication of the shortlist has led to a scramble among the sites to win government backing. The Scottish government in keen on the idea, for the kudos of being seen to be a space nation. Operators now enter three months of consultation before the decision is made.The airports considered have to have long runways and have airspace that can be easily segregated to allow spaceplane flights to operate alongside normal aviation. Sites have to be remote from population, on the coast to minimise the risks from “down-range abnormal occurrences” – meaning spaceplanes crashing or bits falling off. Space travel is the highest carbon activity known to man; worse even than  Formula One racing or using private jets.

.
.

 

Read more »

Linlithgow MSP sends her own 42-page report on impact of Edinburgh flight path trial to CAA

The “Tutur” flight path trial at Edinburgh airport created a storm of protest, from those finding themselves under a new, narrow flight path for the first time. The trial had to be stopped two months early, in October, because of the opposition. Now Fiona Hyslop, the MSP for Linlithgow, which was partly overflown in the trial, has herself surveyed 2,000 residents in West Lothian to find out their views. She has sent her 42-page report to the CAA. Ms Hyslop said the reason for her report was that residents had been kept in the dark about the potential for a new Edinburgh flight path and although the CAA “will receive a report from Edinburgh Airport stating that the complaints they received have originated from a small number of residents who have repeatedly complained, Edinburgh Airport did not proactively contact each individual resident as I have.” Of the 2,000 surveyed, she found that 1,220 respondents felt that noise created by planes overhead was intrusive or disturbing while they were in their house with the windows shut. 760 of those surveyed found that there had been either no change, that the noise was barely noticeable or that it was tolerable. In two areas, the number saying they had been adversely affected were 71% and 60%. These results give a  much fuller picture of the noise impact than “simply stating the results from two temporary noise monitors as Edinburgh Airport propose to do.”
.

 

West Lothian flight path report sent to aviation chiefs

30 DEC 2015 (Daily Record)

BY EDDIE HARBINSON

Forty-two page document details noise complaints during four month trial

MSP [Member of the Scottish Parliament] Fiona Hyslop has sent a 42-page report into the impact of flight path noise over West Lothian to the Civil Aviation Authority

Linlithgow MSP Fiona Hyslop sent the document after surveying 2000 residents during the
Edinburgh Airport flight path trial between June and October last year.

She found that 1,220 respondents felt that noise created by planes overhead was intrusive or disturbing while they were in their house with the windows shut.

But 760 of those surveyed found that there had been either no change, that the noise was barely noticeable or that it was tolerable.

Ms Hyslop claimed the reason for her report was that residents had been kept in the dark about the potential for a new take-off flight path from Edinburgh Airport.

She said: “I am asking the CAA to bear in mind that although they will receive a report from Edinburgh Airport stating that the complaints they received have originated from a small number of residents who have repeatedly complained, Edinburgh Airport did not proactively contact each individual resident as I have.

“Therefore any decision that the CAA come to must take into consideration the 2,000 plus views that I have collated from my survey.

“Edinburgh Airport had the opportunity to contact all residents in West Lothian to notify them of the new flight path prior to it starting but they chose not to.

“As a result they are misinformed about the level and severity of the disruption.

“My report goes a long way to ensure the CAA are aware of the real issues behind this proposed flight path and the actual effects it has had on my constituents, rather than simply stating the results from two temporary noise monitors as Edinburgh Airport propose to do.”

edinburgh villages and townsMap to illustrate where the affected places are in relation to the airport

Ecclesmachan was the place with the highest percentage of people found the noise intrusive – 47% of those surveyed.

In Linlithgow, a third of people said the noise was noticeable but half of those surveyed said there had been no change, the noise was barely noticeable or it was tolerable.

60% of Broxburn residents claimed they had been adversely affected, while in Uphall that figure rose to 71%.

Trial route map

But a spokesman for Edinburgh Airport said: “The recent flight path trial was conducted to gain essential information to enable a full consultation with local residents.

“In line with CAA guidance we informed all local MPs, MSPs – including a meeting with Ms Hyslop – and councils were contacted in advance to inform them of the trial.

“As previously stated, any future airspace change trails will be preceded by a direct engagement process with local residents.

“In January 2016 we will publicise the results of the trial including noise and any resulting proposed air space change will include comprehensive stakeholder consultation.”

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/local-news/west-lothian-flight-path-report-7092256

.

Edinburgh airport current 3 routes and new trialled one TUTUR

.


 

See also

People living with Edinburgh airport plane noise adamant that changes to routes persist

The new campaign group, Stop Edinburgh Airspace Trial (SEAT), was set up last year in response to the suddenly increased noise from the TUTUR trial that started in June 2015 over some areas. They say Edinburgh Airport is planning to impose a “new airspace regime” on the area surrounding it – effectively a secret flight path. The purpose of TUTUR was to see if the airport could increase capacity by cutting the departure interval between flights from two minutes to one. However, people living beneath it have attacked the airport’s lack of transparency. Helena Paul, from SEAT said Edinburgh Airport failed to adequately communicate about the TUTUR experiment with communities.” She also said there were concerns that data from airport-positioned noise monitors would “not adequately reflect the disturbance on the ground”. The trial was stopped 2 months early after nearly 8,000 complaints. Yet SEAT members say they are still hearing about new problems with noise being experience by residents across West Lothian and into Fife. There are complaints that planes are more frequent, lower and louder. But the airport says: “Aircraft have been flying in and out of Edinburgh Airport on the same routes for 40 years; they are not flying any lower or louder than they did in the past.” This a now familiar pattern – residents and airports not agreeing. The airport will publicise the results of the trial later this month.

Click here to view full story…

.


See earlier:

 

Edinburgh trial (no prior consultation) of new narrow route to be ended 2 months early, due to opposition

Edinburgh Airport is to halt its controversial trial of a new flight path two months early (28th October). The trial of the concentrated route resulted in unacceptable levels of noise for those below the new route. The airport’s Chief executive Gordon Dewar admitted the airport had been overwhelmed with complaints about the trial route over areas which were not previously over flown. He said a letter from Transport Minister, Derek Mackay, asking if the trial could be shortened had also influenced the decision. The announcement was made at a packed public meeting in Broxburn. Like all other new routes that have been introduced through the CAA, there was no consultation. Mr Dewar said on the consultation: “…I do apologise. We have learned a lesson on that one.” The CAA has been taken aback by the extent of opposition to every new concentrated flight path it has introduced, and appears unable to work out how to implement the European SESAR changes to airspace on an articulate and determined population, against their will. Someone at the meeting commented that Gordon Dewar’s presentation was met with silence from the audience. But a short video by Sally Pavey, an experienced noise campaigner from Gatwick, received enthusiastic applause. Campaigners from affected airports are linking up to oppose unsuitable airspace changes.

Click here to view full story…

.

Scottish MSPs call for the Edinburgh flight path trial, that is reducing people to tears, to be ended early

Edinburgh Airport started a trial of a new flight path in June, due to continue till 24th December. The purpose of the route is to enable the airport to have take-offs every minute, rather than every two minutes. It has resulted in a narrow, concentrated flight path over areas that did not have much plane noise before, and this has caused real distress. People are especially infuriated because the CAA allows NATS to run trials with no consultation of the public. This consultation is currently only needed once the trial has been done (and it pretty much a fait accompli). Campaigners of SEAT (Stop Edinburgh Airspace Trial) launched a petition against the trial and have won the support of cross-party Lothian MSPs, including Labour’s Neil Findlay who yesterday led the debate. Four MSPs spoke up in a debate at Hollyrood, saying it is not acceptable that people now badly affected by noise were not consulted, and they want the trial ended early.  Alison Johnstone (Green Party Scotland) said the relentless noise, often from 5am all day through till midnight, had reduced people to tears due to stress and sleep deprivation. She added, re. the CAA: “Just because you don’t have to consult, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t.”

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2015/09/scottish-msps-call-for-the-edinburgh-flight-path-trial-that-is-reducing-people-to-tears-to-be-ended-early/

.

Edinburgh Airport unveils 5 month trial of flight path to boost the airport’s capacity

Edinburgh Airport has unveiled details of a 5-month trial of a new flight path for aircraft taking off to the west, in a bid to increase capacity. The Airspace Trial, which will begin on 25 June, will introduce a new SID route, the purpose of which is to allow more flights to use the runway, and allow aircraft to take off at one-minute intervals. This is to “allow the airport to maintain safe and sustainable growth without affecting punctuality.” Most of the time the flights take off to the west and there are currently 3 SID€™ routes – known as Grice (which goes north), Gosam (which goes south west) and Talla (south). The new route – Tutur – will see aircraft take off in a south westerly direction and turn right towards the River Forth, passing over West Lothian and to the east of Linlithgow. The settlements worse affected, with planes at 1900 – 2000 feet, would be Uphall and Dechmont. Map Aircraft will climb as they turn, to fly over the coast and down the Firth of Forth passing North Queensferry, and then fly back over land at approximately 13,000ft near Musselburgh. The airport says the aircraft using the trial route are likely to be their least noisy (B737s, A319, A320, A321, 787 and A330s). The airport says the trial would monitor the impact on local communities, and noise monitors would be placed along the flight path to collect data on the flights.

Click here to view full story…

.

.

.

 

Read more »

Gatwick objects to new hospice due to increase in ‘bird strike risk hazard’ – as within 13 km radius of airport

Under guidance from the DfT, airports have to be statutory consultees for any planning application within a radius of 13 km of the airport, that might have an impact on it, for a variety of reasons. One of these is the risk of bird strike, and so new developments that might attract birds are opposed. Now Gatwick Airport has objected to plans for a new hospice and homes in Pease Pottage [south of Crawley, and about 6km south of Gatwick airport] due to an increase in ‘bird strike risk hazard’. St Catherine’s Hospice would provide a 48-bed care facility, and there would also be up to 600 new homes, cafe, a community building, retail units, and a new primary school. The current hospice has only 18 beds, and is not able to cater for the number of people needing palliative support in the area  nor has sufficient family areas. Gatwick says the areas of open water in the application would attract birds large enough to endanger planes, including  feral geese, duck, grey heron and cormorants – especially if the public feed them. Gatwick also fear the mown grassland would provide a grazing habitat for birds. Gatwick wants minimal water. Airports keep their grassed areas as unappealing to bird life as possible. Gatwick set out, for the Airports Commission, what it would do to “control and where possible reduce bird hazard.”
.

 

 

Gatwick airport objects to new hospice due to increase in ‘bird strike risk hazard’

31 December 2015

Link to map showing location of Pease Pottage in relation to Gatwick

Gatwick Airport has objected to plans for a new hospice and homes in Pease Pottage [south of Crawley, and about 6km south of Gatwick airport] due to an increase in ‘bird strike risk hazard’.

St Catherine’s Hospice has partnered with Thakeham Homes to promote a new development on land off Brighton Road for a 48-bed care facility, up to 600 new homes, cafe, a community building, retail units, and a new primary school.

The hospice, based in Malthouse Road, Crawley, has 18 inpatient beds, but is not currently able to cater for the amount of people needing palliative support in the area and has limited family areas.

However Gatwick, as a consultee, has objected to the application as it stands, as it believes the open water in the proposed ponds will attract birds ‘hazardous to aircraft’ such as feral geese, duck, grey heron and cormorants.

Birds can cause damage to aircraft either by being sucked into the engines or by colliding with the windscreen, as happened in 2009 when a plane was forced to safely land in New York’s Hudson River shortly after take off.

Gatwick’s consultation response, sent to Mid Sussex District Council as the local planning authority, read: “As this is a residential development it is envisaged that feeding of the birds by the general public is highly likely, thus creating an additional attractant to these birds.”

It also suggested that the grassland surrounding the water bodies, if mown short, could create a grazing habitat for birds, and suggested that open water should be reduced to a minimum.

Meanwhile Highways England has raised concerns that proposals have the potential to impact the ‘safe and efficient operation of the strategic road network’, in this case the M23 at junction 11, and part of the A23.
It has asked for more information to be provided in the application’s transport assessment and travel plans, as well as a commitment from Metrobus that it will extend the number 1 service from Broadfield.

However a number of residents have written to the district council in support of the application, describing a new facility to care for terminally-ill people as a ‘no-brainer’.

One resident added: “There should be no debate, this facility is urgently needed in the area and this site represents the best location.”

Giles Tomsett, chief executive of St Catherine’s Hospice, urged the council to recognise the wider benefits the application will offer as the hospice is a ‘strategic asset to the wider health economy’.
Although the charity has received a number of sizeable donations towards the new hospice project, it still needs to raise another £6m if planning approval is granted.

Residents can respond to the application’s consultation on MSDC’s planning portal.
http://www.wscountytimes.co.uk/news/local/airport-objects-to-new-hospice-due-to-increase-in-bird-strike-risk-hazard-1-7139426

.


 

.

Guidance from the DfT 4.11.2005

Safeguarding aerodromes, technical sites and military explosives storage areas

this includes:

Aerodrome safeguarding maps: “Birdstrike” hazard

Birdstrikes are one of the major controllable hazards to aviation. Common birds have caused catastrophic accidents to all types of aircraft. Most birdstrikes occur on or near aerodromes but, because birds are very mobile, features far beyond an aerodrome boundary may increase the hazard. If a man-made development provides feeding, roosting or breeding opportunities, or shelter and security, it may, depending on the siting of the development and the species which it attracts, increase the number of birds visiting or overflying an aerodrome or the number of birds in the airspace used by aircraft. Gulls and starlings congregate in very large overnight roosts and travel long distances daily, while waterfowl are large and often fly in close formation. There is only limited scope for taking action on aerodromes to counter these hazards, and safeguarding may be the only effective means of reducing the risk to aircraft in flight.

The primary aim is to guard against new or increased hazards caused by development. The most important types of development in this respect are: facilities intended for the handling, compaction, treatment or disposal of household or commercial wastes, which attract a variety of species, including gulls, starlings, lapwings and corvids; the creation or modification of areas of water such as reservoirs, lakes, ponds, wetlands and marshes, which attract gulls and waterfowl; nature reserves and bird sanctuaries; and sewage disposal and treatment plant and outfalls, which can attract gulls and other species. Planting trees and bushes normally creates a bird hazard only when it takes place relatively near to an aerodrome, but a potential starling roost site further away from an aerodrome can create a hazard. Mineral extraction and quarrying can also create a bird hazard because, although these processes do not in themselves attract birds, the sites are commonly used for landfill or the creation of wetland.

In order to protect aerodromes against these hazards, safeguarding maps include, in addition to the requirements related to the height of buildings and structures, a dotted circle, with a 13 kilometre radius in the case of civil aerodromes and an eight mile (about 12.87 kilometre) radius in the case of military aerodromes, centred on the safeguarded aerodrome reference point to indicate the area within which developments likely to attract birds require similar consultation. Local planning authorities are required to consult the relevant consultee before granting planning permission for any development within the relevant radius of an officially safeguarded civil or military aerodrome which is likely to attract birds. Whether or not a development is likely to attract birds will depend on a number of factors. A local planning authority will need to consider not only the individual potential bird attractant features of a proposed development but also whether the development, when combined with existing land features, will make the safeguarded area, or parts of it, more attractive to birds or create a hazard such as bird flightlines across aircraft flightpaths.

….

from

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safeguarding-aerodromes-technical-sites-and-military-explosives-storage-areas

.


 

Gatwick Airport’s

A Second Runway for Gatwick Appendix A10 Biodiversity

May 2014 for the Airports Commission

In practical terms, measures are taken to deny birds feeding, nesting, loafing and roosting through careful design, good estate management and use of dispersal action/scaring where necessary. There are restrictions with respect to planting trees, landscaping, and also in relation to the planting palette, e.g. that the species used should not be berry bearing. New ponds or open water courses are generally required to be netted to prevent bird hazard. 3.9 The Airport is required to be consulted by the Local Planning Authorities on proposed developments that have the potential to be bird attractant within 13 km of the aerodrome.

….

We remain fully committed to the maintenance of diverse habitats in and alongside the River Mole, and likewise in areas of countryside that we own to the east of the railway, subject to aerodrome safeguarding requirements which, for example, require us to avoid the use of plant species, or the creation of habitats, attractive to large flocking birds. We also have a commitment to replace trees that are lost as a consequence of airport development and, as well as attending to the land within our ownership, we support good countryside management in Gatwick’s vicinity’.

….

The Airport will continue to be required to control and where possible reduce bird hazard within and around its environs and the CAA will expect that bird hazard is not increased as a result of the proposals as per the directive in CAP772. This will require an understanding of the risks the present habitat poses to aircraft operations, and also the context of the development in respect of the mosaic of surrounding habitats in the Low Weald NCA. In developing proposals Gatwick will consult with the CAA, Natural England and the Environment Agency.

….

The on-site grassland provides particular opportunities for mitigation and enhancement of airfield grasslands, even though the areas concerned are managed carefully by the Airport to reduce bird hazard. These grassland areas can be designed to have low nutrient soils, which in the longer term (10 years or so) would effectively develop into low productivity lowland grassland. It is recognized that the mowing regime would militate against achieving high floral diversity. Nevertheless, the large area coupled with an appropriate management regime would achieve an equivalent resource to that being displaced by the airport extension. Despite close wildlife hazard management by Airports, such airside grasslands have been known to develop to support population of Brown Hare and Skylark. [!!!]

….

In circumstances where new habitat is proposed to offset that which is lost, the CAA will require to be consulted closely as will Natural England and the Environment Agency, so as to ensure that risks from Bird Hazard are not increased.

….

from

https://www.gatwickairport.com/globalassets/publicationfiles/business_and_community/all_public_publications/second_runway/airports_commission/gatwick_appendix_a10_biodiversity.pdf

.


 

Information from Biggin Hill airport on its rights as a statutory consultee, on planning applications within a 13 km radius of the airport:

This states (some extracts below) :

Birdstrike – controlling developments (e.g. water features and waste disposal sites) which have the potential to increase the number of birds or the bird hazard risk.

The Local Planning Authority is required to consult the Airport, when considering developments where the height of a proposed building or structure would exceed the level indicated on the safeguarding map.

The map also includes a dotted circle with a 13km radius, around Biggin Hill Airport to indicate the area within which developments likely to attract birds require consultation of the Airport. Such applications include: facilities for handling compaction, treatment or disposal of household or commercial wastes, the creation or modification of areas of water such as reservoirs, lakes, ponds, wetlands and marshes, nature reserves and bird sanctuaries, and sewage disposal and treatment plant. Applications for development of this nature should be accompanied by a Birdstrike Hazard Assessment.

Consultation is required not just on full or outline planning applications, but for an application for the amendment of an outline planning permission or an application for the removal or modification of conditions imposed on a previous planning permission.

When consulted on the type of proposed developments outlined above, the Airport considers whether the proposals could compromise the safe operation of the Airport, impair the performance of aircraft, airport navigation or Instrument Flight Procedures or cause a birdstrike hazard. The Airport will respond in writing to the relevant Local Planning Authority accordingly. If the Airport has insufficient information to consider the proposed development they will submit a holding objection to the Local Planning Authority requesting further information. This could delay the determination of a planning application.

From http://www.bigginhillairport.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/BHA-Airport-Safeguarding.pdf

.


 

See earlier:

Birds of prey and robot bird being used to keep birds away from airports


 


 

Read more »

Letter to Bo Redeborn – re. Gatwick flight path review: “Don’t let us down”

People living in areas around Penshurst, Crowborough, Tunbridge Wells, Bidborough etc began to suffer from far worse Gatwick noise from early 2014. Changes had been made to Gatwick arrivals flight paths, without consultation. There is now an independent review being undertaken, of the changes. It is being done by Bo Redeborn and Graham Lake, and will be published on 28th January. It is hoped that this will not be a whitewash. A resident from a village in West Kent has written to Bo Redeborn, expressing very clearly the necessity of the review being genuinely independent, and avoiding the ambiguities, evasions and half-truths that have plagued the whole flight path change situation from its start. The writer says: “Until or unless you are able to tell us precisely what changed, why it changed, who proposed it and who authorised it then to all intents and purposes this really is ‘vectoring choices’. If this is not PBN, if this is not SESAR, if this is not government directed policy, then this really is caused by a bunch of ATCs [Air Traffic Controllers] making arbitrary decisions to send planes down pig trails. So it can, and should, be restored ‘overnight’ as confirmed by Charles Kirwan-Taylor.” He concludes: “Mr Redeborn, an awful lot of people are depending upon you to repair their shattered lives; don’t let us down.”  See the whole letter ….
.

 

Gatwick say (and have said many times)
“… the impression may be that something has changed, although I can assure you nothing has …”    Stewart Wingate, Chief Executive, Gatwick     18.07.14 to Charles Hendry MP

Are you sure?

2010 2014
gon_251114_01.jpg gon_251114_02.jpg

 

30.12.2015

Letter to Bo Redeborn and Graham Lake

from a resident in West Kent, living for over a year and a half under a new intensified flight path for Gatwick arrivals

 

(extracts only ….)

 

…This once beautiful location (‘one of Kent’s oldest and most beautiful villages’ – National Trust) is now a living hell and I hope that you are fully aware of the expectation that we have of a satisfactory outcome to your review.  [Review link]

What is being perpetrated in the skies above West Kent is unnecessary, is unjustifiable and is totally intolerable.

One hint of a fudge from the review and those that have had their lives destroyed would be totally justified in kicking some doors in, figuratively,…..of those that still, unbelievably, continue to lie about what has gone on and …..of those that are paid handsomely to protect us, yet for some reason choose to pass by on the other side.

…. you know what’s gone on, and you know why it’s gone on; we had to work it out for ourselves, but we know what has gone on and we know why it has gone on.

Tom Denton certainly knew what was going on – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25741337 – and so did Stewart Wingate. Mr McNulty knew what was going on and so did the company that Mr Major advises – they stood to be the prime beneficiaries and only initiated a review under duress in order to protect its share price.

The problem is that when planes started screaming in down concentrated flight paths …. people noticed, which was something of an inconvenience as GAL [Gatwick Airport Ltd] had everything mapped out; clearly it believed that the best way to deal with the 975% increase in complaints was to ignore them.

We knew that trials to increase capacity had taken place, but Stewart Wingate lied about it; the GAL website was subsequently doctored.

GAL’s ‘consultation’ to create an aviation superhighway was botched and had to be spiked, so Gatwick imposed it anyway and this is the misery we have been left with.

Mr Redeborn, notwithstanding the vested interest of your paymasters, the results of your review will be the very essence of the people vs profit wrangle; this has become a head to head between some of the most important amenity space and heritage sites in the south east and an amoral, voracious foreign hedge fund.  It is a straight fight between the health, wealth and happiness of my family and thousands like it and the Pension fund of Korea and it is within your gift to influence the outcome.

I have read the runes and I just want to be sure that no little wrinkles or loop holes exist in your final judgement that could impact its conclusions, recommendations or adoption.

Firstly, I understand that Mr Lake said at the public meeting in Crowborough that ‘flight paths haven’t changed’; if that appears in your conclusions, I suspect it would be wise to strike that through – a 975% increase in complaints is not a result of mass hysteria it is a result of massive disrespect.

If aviation guidelines allow an amoral operator to behave in such a fashion, and an aviation expert to make such a risible pronouncement, they are not fit for purpose.

Secondly, you stated in Tunbridge Wells that ‘reverting to the situation before 2013 is not feasible’; I totally refute that statement.

Until or unless you are able to tell us precisely what changed, why it changed, who proposed it and who authorised it then to all intents and purposes this really is ‘vectoring choices’.

If this is not PBN, if this is not SESAR, if this is not government directed policy, then this really is caused by a bunch of ATCs [Air Traffic Controllers] making arbitrary decisions to send planes down pig trails. So it can, and should, be restored ‘overnight’ as confirmed by Charles Kirwan-Taylor.

If you are tempted to include the NATS statistic that 90% of approaches are CDA [continuous descent approach] that will undermine any other conclusion; planes are levelling out fully 25 miles from the runway, before joining the magic roundabout out over the High Weald and then screaming to join the ILS from below. Planes have never been this low, planes do not need to be this low. Planes cannot be this low in the future.

If you are tempted to include the following to fob us off regarding the extended joining point to the ILS –  “based on well intentioned safety improvements to reduce unstable approach risks” –  I reckon you’d be well advised to keep that one in your quiver.

GAL lobbied CAA to extend the joining point after it botched its consultation.  FOI requests proved that its justification on safety grounds were entirely bogus –  go-arounds actually increased as a proportion and the primary reason was ‘runway not clear’ – a result of trying to squeeze a quart into a pint pot.

Andrew Haines was subsequently found to be massaging and misrepresenting figures to cover GAL’s lies.  The CAA is meant to be the regulator?

There is no justification to extend the joining point on safety grounds and however ‘well intentioned’ it was, rather than restoring an 8 nm joining point I think technology would allow you to recommend something closer than the previous 7 nm – particularly as Gatwick is still touting 6.95 nm for its second runway.

The other thing that I feel has no place in your review is the Airbus ‘whine’; this is something that has been known about for a decade and only came to the fore when concentrated flight paths were created without consultation or permission and the altitude of approaches was slashed.

It is an issue that needs to be addressed but I don’t think that claiming to have ‘mitigated’ the effect of an airframe defect should be included in your review; you should identify the reason the nuisance was exacerbated in the first place and then propose how its impact can be lessened in lieu of modifications being made to the offending planes.

We have been suffering from two years of frustration, anger and aural assault – quite wilfully imposed upon an arbitrarily created minority; we have been fed lie after lie and I hope that you will take the opportunity to deliver a genuine blueprint for a return to the equitable situation that existed in the past.  I suspect that if it looks as though the future can even resemble the present – things will escalate.

We don’t have ages to wait for improvements either; unless you want to tell me otherwise, months and years of airspace planning did not go into creating this torture, so neither must there be any of the dragging of the feet that is being seen elsewhere. It was turned on overnight, it can be turned off overnight.

And if you are even tempted to suggest that things could have been just so much better if GAL’s communication and community engagement was improved, just take one look at the toe-curlingly embarassing pamphlets that were sent out recently trumpeting the arrival of Brer Dormouse in Gatwick’s green and pleasant land; in fact so fantastic are Gatwick’s green credentials that I don’t imagine it will be long until Bottlenose Dolphins are spotted pushing up the River Mole just to get a snout full of its Alpine-fresh air.

Just one thing, a slightly less glossy paper stock would make any future editions more absorbent and therefore suggest at least one useful purpose for it.

Mr Redeborn, an awful lot of people are depending upon you to repair their shattered lives; don’t let us down.

Sincerely

 

[Name supplied]


Public meeting in Crowborough hears from Bo Redeborn about his review of Gatwick flight paths

The MP for Wealden, Nus Ghani, organised a meeting on 23rd October for people in the Crowborough area who are being disturbed by flights over them, arriving at Gatwick. In August, in response to the high degree of opposition to changes to fight paths, Gatwick set up an “independent review” of air traffic, which will focus on Westerly Arrivals. This is being led by Bo Redeborn, who is being “assisted by a small independent review team which has been tasked with ensuring the involvement of local communities most affected.” The review is to look at whether everything that can reasonably be done to alleviate the problems which local communities are raising is in fact being done, (by Gatwick, NATS, CAA, DfT or the airlines); and the approaches which Gatwick has adopted for providing information to the local community and for handling complaints are fully adequate for the task. Bo Redeborn was present at the Crowborough meeting, and also Graham Lake, the Technical Adviser to the review team. They answered questions from concerned residents, who are not persuaded that Gatwick has either done enough or responded appropriately to concerns. To submit your views about Gatwick Airport to Nus Ghani MP download a copy of the consultation form: Gatwick Feedback Form.

Click here to view full story…

Gatwick announces “independent review” of Westerly Arrivals due to the extent of opposition to changed flight paths

Due to the level of disturbance, upset and anger for miles around Gatwick, from increased aircraft noise, narrowed and altered flight paths, Gatwick’s Chairman, Sir Roy McNulty, has commissioned an “independent review” of air traffic, which will focus on Westerly Arrivals (ie. planes arriving from the east, to the airport, when there are westerly winds). The review will be led by Bo Redeborn, who for many years was Principal Director of ATM for EUROCONTROL. Gatwick airport says Mr Redeborn “will be assisted by a small independent review team which has been tasked with ensuring the involvement of local communities most affected.” The review is to look at whether, for westerly arrivals: “Everything that can reasonably be done to alleviate the problems which local communities are raising is in fact being done, whether this involves action by the airport or by other parties most closely involved – NATS, CAA, DfT or the airlines.” And if Gatwick’s approach to providing “information to the local community and for handling complaints are fully adequate for the task.” Thousands of people do not believe Gatwick is succeeding on either. The review is to begin on 1st September 2015. It may end in November, but may be extended if more consultation is needed. There will be a review of Easterly Arrivals later on.

Click here to view full story…

Read more »

Lilian Greenwood displays the confused thinking of Labour in its enthusiasm for a runway

The Labour party remains in a mess on what to do on runways. They have a position of stating that “Labour will study the government’s proposals carefully, alongside any additional material that is commissioned, and we will respond on the basis of our four tests for aviation expansion. These are: 1.That robust and convincing evidence was produced that the Commission’s recommendations would provide sufficient capacity.  2. That the UK’s legal climate change obligations could still be met.  3. That local noise and environmental impacts can be managed and minimised.  4. That the benefits of any expansion were not confined to London and the South East.” But, though Lilian Greenwood, the Shadow Transport Secretary herself bought up a bit of Airplot in 2009 to prevent a Heathrow runway, she now says: “There is no doubt … that we need a new runway.”  And “Aviation expansion is a matter of national significance and, having committed to addressing the problem head on, David Cameron faces a loss of credibility if he ducks the issue now. The UK needs additional capacity, but the prospect of any expansion is now in doubt.” But Labour itself says the runway has to meet the 4 conditions. And in reality that is not possible. So Labour’s position?
.

 

Heathrow or Gatwick? It’s make your mind up time for David Cameron

By Lilian Greenwood (Labour’s shadow transport secretary)

28.12.2015 (City Metric)

She says: 

“Few policy problems have proved to be as intractable as providing new airport capacity – but the case for action is overwhelming.

The UK has produced a long list of discarded plans for new airports. Lullingstone, Cubbington and Maplin Sands were all unrealised, and Boris Johnson’s Thames Estuary Airport on the Isle of Grain looks set to join them. Even when new runways have been built, they have provoked intense local and ecological protests. The construction of a second runway at Manchester Airport 15 years ago was a case in point.

There is no doubt, however, that we need a new runway. Heathrow is full, and it has been for a decade. Gatwick operates at 85 per cent of its capacity, and it too is effectively full during the peak period. No new full-length runway has been built in the South East since the 1940s. [The reason is that the UK built a lot of full length runways for the RAF in the War. AW note].

Redistributing demand to underutilised airports is easier in theory than in practice, and the Airports Commission found that, without action, the entire London airport network would be operating at the limits of its capacity by 2040.

It has become clear over the last few days that David Cameron is hamstrung. He commissioned an independent report that strongly recommended Heathrow expansion, yet he is also faced with the threat of a by-election triggered by his mayoral candidate if that recommendation is adopted.

Now he has to choose which pledge he breaks: either that “a decision will be made by the end of the year,” as he told MPs in July, or his famous 2009 promise that there would be no third runway at Heathrow – “no ifs, no buts”.

This continued indecision is deeply damaging for the economy, and it is causing blight for residents who live close to both Heathrow and Gatwick.

It’s vital that questions over the environmental impacts of expansion are addressed; but they must be genuinely investigated and not just used as an excuse to kick the issue further down the road. Aviation accounts for around 6% of UK greenhouse gas emissions and airports have not always been regarded as good neighbours, especially when it comes to noise pollution.

The Airports Commission recommended that an independent noise authority should be created two years ago. This is a sensible recommendation that could have already been implemented without prejudicing a wider decision on runway capacity – so why has the government failed to take action?

We have also taken note of the Environmental Audit Committee’s concerns which were published in early December. Ministers must make sure that when they do bring a proposal before parliament they are doing so on a sound legal basis. There can be no repeat of the West Coast franchise scandal which cost taxpayers over £50m. However, as the Committee itself said, “the government should not avoid or defer these issues”. It’s clear that the report is not a charter for further, indefinite delay.

Labour will study the government’s proposals carefully, alongside any additional material that is commissioned, and we will respond on the basis of our four tests for aviation expansion:

1.That robust and convincing evidence was produced that the Commission’s recommendations would provide sufficient capacity;
2. That the UK’s legal climate change obligations could still be met;
3. That local noise and environmental impacts can be managed and minimised;
4. That the benefits of any expansion were not confined to London and the South East.
We have also set out a set of proposals which would support the wider aviation industry. The National Infrastructure Commission should study the road and rail requirements of airports outside the South East, and the government should confirm the HS2 Manchester Airport Station as soon as possible. These measures are not, however, in themselves a substitute for new runway capacity in the South East.

Aviation expansion is a matter of national significance and, having committed to addressing the problem head on, David Cameron faces a loss of credibility if he ducks the issue now. The UK needs additional capacity, but the prospect of any expansion is now in doubt. The country – and people who live under the flightpaths of both Heathrow and Gatwick – deserve better.”

Lilian Greenwood is MP for Nottingham South, and Labour’s shadow transport secretary.

http://www.citymetric.com/politics/heathrow-or-gatwick-its-make-your-mind-time-david-cameron-1673

.


 

Some comments by AirportWatch members:

At the moment the article by Lilian Greenwood is the clearest we are going to get from Labour. She must know the policy is a muddle, so is sticking rigidly to these four tests. There is a lot support within Labour – and even amongst London Labour MPs – for Heathrow. Labour have correctly worked out that the Government decision to delay gives them at least another 6 months to become clearer on policy. Jeremy Corbyn and of course John McDonnell are against a 3rd runway at Heathrow but their views don’t necessarily reflect that of all their MPs.  It is likely that for a lot of their MPs outside the SE (which is most of them) this is not an issue that is top of their agenda. So the response from these MPs is to give a pretty uninformed knee-jerk reaction as to what they perceive – from all the airport PR and spin – as being best for their constituency.
Can’t see Labour going for Heathrow expansion while John McDonnell is Shadow Chancellor! They might opt for Gatwick (like Sadiq Khan has done) as they have few votes to lose down there.
Maybe Lilian Greenwood could be sent a question entitled “Aviation capacity or climate emissions? It’s make your mind up time for Labour” instead –  asking her to clarify in detail what she means by the second condition ‘ That the UK’s legal climate change obligations could still be met’. The insertion of that word ‘legal’ looks potentially equivocal.
This comment from Lilian Greenwood is aimed at being even handed, but is actually pro-expansion. She believes building more runways is the only option and no doubt would go along with one each at Heathrow and Gatwick with a little further persuasion from the aviation lobby.
Politicians and Sir Howard Davies want people to be pacified with the creation of an INDEPENDENT Noise Authority. We all know that “Independent” means little these days but pro-expansionists love this condition. They love Community Noise Forums too. It all paints a cosy (but erroneous) picture of co-operation and concern for people suffering damage to their health.
There is also a quote about Airplot – “Ms Greenwood said that she had joined the (Airplot) campaign because she had opposed that plan for Heathrow expansion. However, she said that it was different from those now being discussed and she had an “open mind” about whether Labour should back the present plans for a third runway.” Ms Greenwood never bought land, as stated in The Times headline. Even she doesn’t seem to realise that. Confused is one word you could use.
It is irritating that politicians perpetuate the idea that this Heathrow plan is significantly different from the last. As far as I can see it is as damaging as the last, if not more so. The Heathrow villages will still be destroyed, regardless of whether the centre of the destruction is now Harmondsworth rather than Sipson, with Longford being wiped out. (It seems unlikely that the Heathrow Hub option will be selected).

The second point is “That the UK’s legal climate change obligations could still be met.”  AEF have demonstrated very convincingly that a new runway at either airport will in practice mean our legal climate change obligations will not be met. That they ‘could still be’ is the same sort of meaningless fudge Davies hid behind. It is depresisng beyond belief that we may still have to fight Labour Party policy on airports – even with Corbyn in charge. I despair of our political economy ever delivering for ordinary people instead of elites and corporations.

—-
Sadiq Khan on this morning’s Today programme described himself as disagreeing with Corbyn –  in that Sadiq supports Gatwick expansion.  He is happy to dump the airport misery, of which he is well aware, on Sussex, Surrey and Kent – sadly facts he does not pay attention to as these people will not get the chance to vote against him as Mayor.
Sadiq seems so keen to be ‘the most pro business’ mayor that he seems to want to support Gatwick, and looks like London City airport expansion too…. And seems to have calculated he can do that to people around Gatwick, as they are not able to vote against him. And the are is all Tory anyway. But Sadiq  is miscalculating on the green vote – we will certainly expose him for this, but will first try to get him to see that there can be no new runway at Gatwick either  -for climate reasons

Earlier: 

 

Labour divided as 30 northern Labour MPs back Heathrow expansion, believing it would help their regions

Nearly 30 northern Labour MPs have signed a letter backing a 3rd Heathrow.  The letter to Lillian Greenwood, shadow transport secretary, was signed by members of the PLP Northern Group. They include senior figures such as Chi Onwurah,  Kevan Jones, and Nick Brown. This may be an indication of  the Labour party’s divisions over the issue. Key to David Cameron’s calculations will be whether he can win enough backing in Parliament for Heathrow expansion, given that it is opposed by several of his senior colleagues including Zac Goldsmith, Boris Johnson and Justine Greening. Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell are against a Heathrow runway, but it is not clear if Mr Corbyn would order Labour’s 232 MPs to vote against it.  If as many as 26 Labour MPs from one region are in favour of the Heathrow runway it suggests that Mr Corbyn and Mr McDonnell’s views are not shared by all the rest of the party. The PLP Northern Group hope the regions would benefit from a Heathrow runway, and (like everyone else other than a few with the time and abilities to understand it all) have not read the Airports Commission’s papers in detail – showing negative implications for regional airports from a new runway.  A rather flimsy paper by “Quod”, setting out predictions of growth and jobs for the regions, is the basis of hopes by regional MPs.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2015/11/labour-divided-as-30-northern-labour-mps-back-heathrow-expansion-believing-it-would-help-their-regions/

.


Jeremy Corbyn’s opposition to a Heathrow runway likely to lead to internal Labour party disputes

Jeremy Corbyn – who might become leader of the Labour party – has come out against a 3rd runway at Heathrow. The Labour leadership favourite has indicated in an interview with the FT that under him, the party would not support expansion at Heathrow.  He said: “I think the third runway is a problem for noise pollution and so on across west London…I also think there is an under-usage of the other airports around London. I’d vote against it in this parliament.” If he does become leader (decision on 12th September) this would represent a U-turn from the party’s current stance of supporting the runway, if certain conditions are met. Corbyn’s opposition to a Heathrow runway will have an impact on the London mayoral race, as two Labour candidates are in favour of it, and two against. Tessa Jowell, the favourite to win the nomination, would find herself at odds with her party’s leadership on Heathrow. There are also plenty of moderates in the party who would also rebel against Corbyn.  But airports are purely a lobbying issue for mayoral candidates — they have no actual power over the decision. It is not yet known if there will be a parliamentary vote on a runway, though it will require a lot of public funding (directly and indirectly for years). David Cameron will decide by November whether to accept the Airports Commission recommendation of Heathrow, and if Labour now votes against it, that could fatally undermine the project.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2015/08/jeremy-corbyns-opposition-to-a-heathrow-runway-likely-to-lead-to-internal-labour-party-disputes/

 

Labour abandons support for new Heathrow runway

McDonnell and Diane Abbott are strongly opposed to a third runway

By Michael Savage and Laura Pitel

Labour has dropped its support for a third runway at Heathrow in a move that risks another split among Jeremy Corbyn’s new shadow cabinet.

The party had backed the recommendation in the summer by Sir Howard Davies, provided noise and air pollution conditions were met. The move had wrong-footed David Cameron, who faces a split over the issue within his party and is yet to rule on whether to back Heathrow expansion.

Lilian Greenwood, the shadow transport secretary, said that she had an open mind over whether the third runway should be supported, with Mr Corbyn known to be strongly against the plan. “I want to look at all the evidence in more depth,” she said. “We’ve got a new leadership team, I’m new to the shadow secretary of state role, and I want to look at it myself. And I want to have discussions with colleagues.

“It’s no secret that there are differences of opinion on this issue in the Labour party, as indeed there are on the Conservative benches.”

…..

Michael Dugher, the former shadow transport secretary said to be keen on backing Heathrow expansion, is now shadow culture secretary.

…..

Full article at

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/politics/article4561784.ece

.


.

Corbyn ally, Lilian Greenwood, bought land at Airplot, in 2009, to stop Heathrow runway

By Michael Savage Chief Political Correspondent

22.9.2015 (The Times)

The shadow transport secretary was the owner of a slice of land near Heathrow bought to stop a third runway being built. [Airplot, a scheme by Greenpeace] 

Lilian Greenwood, who was promoted in Jeremy Corbyn’s reshuffle of the Labour front bench, was in a group of politicians, activists and celebrities that purchased and shared a plot of land in 2009 to hamper the airport’s expansion plans. Her participation suggests that she held serious concerns about the construction of a third runway. She has vowed to look at all options over airport expansion, in effect ending Labour’s support for a third runway.

…..

Ms Greenwood said that she had joined the campaign because she had opposed that plan for Heathrow expansion. However, she said that it was different from those now being discussed and she had an “open mind” about whether Labour should back the present plans for a third runway.

Mr McDonnell was so angered by the Labour government’s approval of a third runway in 2009 that he grabbed the Speaker’s mace. He was suspended from the Commons for five days.

Full article at

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/politics/article4564011.ece

.

.

 

 

Read more »

Suffolk ex-councillor: why not use RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk instead of Heathrow?

An ex-councillor from Suffolk, Judy Terry, writing in Conservative Home, puts forward the idea of using the redundant RAF base at Mildenhall, in Suffolk as a new airport.  It is a charmingly bonkers idea – but logically no more bonkers than adding a runway at Heathrow or Gatwick. Judy is aware of the negative impacts a new Heathrow runway would have on surrounding residents, and is unconvinced that greatly increasing Heathrow air freight is a great plan, due to road congestion and diesel pollution. She says deferring the decision on a runway makes sense, as “a lot has changed since Howard Davies started his airport review three years ago, and we don’t understand why other options were dismissed.” So, a “new solution” could be putting soon-to-be-redundant airfields in the regions to use as airports. “In the last year, the USAF announced that it will be leaving the RAF’s wartime bomber base in Mildenhall, Suffolk, by 2022.” This will cause job losses and negative impacts on the local economy, so Judy believes Mildenhall should be considered “if only the Heathrow expansion advocates would open their minds to a viable alternative.” “With the support of the local MP, Matt Hancock, the local council has just received a £230,000 grant to review the future, one option being an international airport, subject to the RAF’s future plans.”
.

 

RAF Mildenhall

Map shows location of Mildenhall, and East Midlands airport (red marker)

 

Judy Terry: Don’t expand Heathrow – boost regional airports instead

Judy Terry

By  (Judy Terry is a journalist and marketing professional. She was a Suffolk councillor for 10 years, four of which on the County as Cabinet member for Economic Development, and 10 on Ipswich Borough Council, where she transformed cultural services. She stood down in May this year.)

29.12.2015

How I tire of the criticism and abuse directed at David Cameron. You expect the Opposition to misrepresent the facts, but when business leaders and Conservative backbenchers weigh in, using words like ‘hypocrite’ and ‘coward’ to the media, it’s different.  I wonder if they have any idea how this plays out internationally, let alone in our own country beyond Westminster. Most people just see or hear a headline, which will stick in the mind and inevitably impact future voting intentions.

Do we really want a Corbyn-led government in 2020, and more Labour Police & Crime Commissioners and councillors elected locally next year? It’s about time those critics acknowledged that the economy is about more than their personal ambitions and what happens in the South-East.

Apart from the EU negotiations, latterly focus has been on Heathrow, and the decision to defer a decision for a further review– this time on the potential environmental impact of a third runway.   This has been interpreted as ‘for political reasons’ by the sceptics, citing the forthcoming London Mayoral elections. Yet, for many of us, a deferral makes sense because a lot has changed since Howard Davies started his airport review three years ago, and we don’t understand why other options were dismissed.

Whilst Willie Walsh threatens to take British Airways’ business elsewhere, Boris Johnson has called for “bold, imaginative, new solutions” to the airport expansion dilemma.

Boris is not alone. Apart from those of us trying to get to business appointments, or for a weekend away who are regularly stuck in traffic jams on the M25, if Heathrow expansion goes ahead, residents across the region will have their lives blighted for generations. Not just during the complicated infrastructure works (costing billions and never likely to be delivered on time or on budget), but they will also have to put up with increased aircraft noise, not to mention the impact on their property prices.

It appears that passengers are not the priority after all; demand for another runway comes from the freight industry, which wants increased capacity. However, freight inevitably has to be transported around the country. So why does it have to be imported and exported via London? Where the roads are already clogged up and there are concerns about diesel fumes and the impact on health?

Presumably, the answer is that the capital is the largest market for some incoming goods; that there are existing warehouses local to Heathrow, even if the road/rail infrastructure is inferior, which must increase costs and time delays when moving goods. Or maybe the reluctance to think afresh is simply due to the more usual “we’ve always done it this way and we don’t want to change”.

So, a “new solution” could be putting soon-to-be-redundant airfields in the regions to a new use. In the past, decommissioned airfields have become housing or industrial estates, often stunting wider economic growth (Ipswich is an example) and losing the opportunity for inward investment to create a high paid/ambitious jobs culture. I’ve lost count of the times I’ve heard people say, if only we hadn’t allowed that to happen!

However, all is not lost. In the last year, the USAF announced that it will be leaving the RAF’s wartime bomber base in Mildenhall, Suffolk, by 2022.

Employing 4,200 airmen and civilians, losing the base will have a disastrous impact on the local economy which offers limited alternative employment in this historic market town which was part of the post-War London overspill programme. On the edge of the Fens, just 10 miles from Newmarket and close to the A11,with easy access to Cambridge, it has two particular claims to fame: a 15th century market cross, and the ‘Mildenhall Treasure’, a 4th century hoard of Roman silver, now in the British Museum. Despite its advantages, the town has never lived up to expectations, but the time is right for it to make real progress if only the Heathrow expansion advocates would open their minds to a viable alternative.

With the support of the local MP, Matt Hancock, the local council has just received a £230,000 grant to review the future, one option being an international airport, subject to the RAF’s future plans.

Residents are used to heavy aircraft, and consequently unlikely to resist commercial expansion.

Given the location, it would be convenient for racehorses to be flown around the world, and there would be major advantages for the freight industry in having easier access across the country and to Felixstowe port (for any onward transmission to the continent and across the globe). There is plenty of space to create new, efficient warehousing, and salaries are lower than in the London area; housing is also cheaper.

For the government, costs would also be lower and it would be easier and quicker to deliver the additional capacity. Local road and rail improvements connecting the Eastern region to the Midlands and North (as well as London) are long overdue in any event, so there would be a dual benefit from the investment. Funds could also be made available for grants or loans to support the freight industry to review their business models and develop the new warehousing/transport hubs. In return, the local council would have increased business rates and the Treasury would benefit from higher tax income as more jobs were created, and the benefits budget declined.

Such development would also boost further private investment in a region already renowned for its world class scientific and technical research, especially in the agricultural and medical sectors, with innovations which would benefit not just the UK economy, but help emerging economies and poor countries desperate to improve healthcare and to feed their populations.

Unlike its neighbours in Essex and Norfolk, Suffolk doesn’t have a commercial airport, which has had a seriously detrimental impact on its growth. Mildenhall could change that, and improve so many lives.

http://www.conservativehome.com/localgovernment/2015/12/judy-terry-instead-of-expanding-heathrow-lets-boost-regional-airports.html

 

Related Articles

Peter Thompson: Heathrow expansion would be bad for Hounslow

Anna Round: If Osborne’s Northern Powerhouse is to work, it needs devolved education and skills – not just infrastructure

Heathrow: to expand or not to expand?

.


Some comments under the article:

     January 01 2016, 4:42PM   
Clearly the closure of Mildenhall will be a big blow to the local economy and not least in falling local and surrounding property prices. With US central air command moved to Mannheim, Germany its also questionable for how long Lakenheath too remains operational. An over dependency on the *US has no doubt been too long taken for granted, however although early days it appears unfortunate that the Cllr. presently seems intent in trying to raise false hopes by clutching at (fanciful) straws. In that regard perhaps he might do better than enquire if Marshalls here in Cambridge are silently waiting in the long grass!

     January 01 2016, 2:47PM   
Bonkers idea, Suffolk just doesn’t have the population to justify an International Airport, look at Cambridge that has just decided to stop offering passenger flights. It mentions that it would be far better to fly cargo from Mildenhall rather than Heathrow, the reality is that there are few if any purely cargo flights into Heathrow, the cargo travels in the aircraft hold alongside our suitcases. Cargo aircraft use Stansted instead. All shows that you don’t have to be very bright to be a Cllr, but the ability to talk ******** is advantageous.

    January 01 2016, 12:17PM  
A very good idea. Of course, infrastructure improvements would need to take place, especially railway expansion. but runways are already there, and the buildings on the base could be put to good use for an airport. I am glad that USAF Mildenhall will close, World War 2 has been over for over 70 years and the Soviet Union has been gone for 25 years.

Read more »