East Midlands Airport shifted record volumes of freight for online shopping in the Christmas period

Although passenger flights are down 90%, East Midland airport has had more in cargo-only planes in the run-up to Christmas. In December, it handling 46,320 tonnes of goods, up on the previous record set in November.  A rise in online shoppers helped drive unprecedented air and rail shipments through and around the airport, which is a hub for dedicated express freight operators such as DHL, UPS, FedEx and the Royal Mail. Expansion within the airport has been coupled with the growth of SEGRO’s vast East Midlands Gateway distribution park to the north and the new Maritime Rail Freight Interchange linking the park to the rail network. The SEGRO site close to Junction 24 of the M1, is already home to Amazon, XPO logistics (working for Nestlé), Shop Direct, Kuehne & Nagel and Games Workshop. Mars UK recently announced an agreement with DHL for a big new warehouse at the huge site. An airport manager said  they had been processing up to 400 vehicles every 24 hours, “keeping customer goods flowing around the UK and rest of the world.”  
.

 

Shops might be closed, but online sales see East Midlands Airport shift record volumes of Christmas presents

Although passenger flights are down 90%, airport has seen a big rise in cargo-only planes

birminghampost

25.1.2021

East Midlands Airport and the haulage, warehousing and rail freight hubs surrounding it, handled record cargo volumes in the run-up to Christmas.

New figures show online shoppers helped drive unprecedented air and rail shipments through and around the airport – one of Europe’s busiest air cargo hubs.

While passenger flights have been devastated by global lockdowns – down 90 per cent at East Midlands Airport – the Castle Donington operation has seen a big rise in cargo-only planes.

It is a hub for dedicated express freight operators such as DHL, UPS, FedEx and the Royal Mail.

Expansion within the airport has been coupled with the growth of SEGRO’s vast East Midlands Gateway distribution park to the north and the new Maritime Rail Freight Interchange linking the park to the rail network.

The Segro site, which is next to junction 24 of the M1, is already home to the likes of Amazon, XPO logistics (working for Nestlé), Shop Direct, Kuehne & Nagel and Games Workshop.

Chocolate, chewing gum and pet food giant Mars UK recently announced an agreement with DHL for a big new warehouse at the £700 million-plus site.

Management at the airport said that many of the goods ordered online by people across the UK prior to Christmas arrived either via the runway or distribution park, before being transported to homes around the country.

John Bailey, Maritime managing director, said: “Six months ago, our terminal was full of stock that retailers didn’t want and there was little activity throughout the day.

“To see the operation now processing up to 400 vehicles every 24 hours, keeping customer goods flowing around the UK and rest of the world is deeply satisfying.”

Andrew Pilsworth, SEGRO national logistics managing director, said: “We have continued to see the demand for well located, modern industrial warehousing rise over the year.

“The vital role that logistics has played during the ongoing pandemic is clear – be it delivering goods to consumers, continuing to provide employment opportunities or contributing to the UK economy.”

Clare James, East Midlands Airport’s managing director, said: “This year has demonstrated the critical importance of the EMA air cargo operation, not just for the movement of consumer items, but for businesses that need to get parts or finished products to market quickly and for the rapid movement of critical medical supplies and equipment throughout the pandemic.

“While our passengers are temporarily unable to leave home to catch holiday flights, the contribution of the airport to the UK and the region during the last year has been more important than ever.”

She said the airport had its busiest peak season for air cargo in December, handling 46,320 tonnes of goods, and up on the previous record set in November.

Maritime, meanwhile, said its freight interchange there saw an average of 1,500 containers a week to and from Felixstowe, London Gateway, Liverpool and Southampton, in the second half of 2020.

It comes as a bid for an inland freeport at East Midlands Airport is prepared for submission on February 5.

Chris Hobson, director of policy and external affairs at East Midlands Chamber of Commerce, said: “If a bid for freeport status is successful, it will bind some of the key sites that are instrumental to our ability to make and move goods.”

https://www.business-live.co.uk/ports-logistics/shops-might-closed-online-sales-19687466

.

.

 

Read more »

Gatwick increased its Government borrowing by £75m to shore up its finances during the Covid period

Gatwick has increased its Government borrowing by £75 million, trying to shore up its finances during the extended Covid travel reduction.  It is thought that Gatwick has also borrowed £250 million under the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF) scheme. Gatwick applied to access the CCFF in August, saying at the time it was a contingency measure and hoped not to touch the money, but now it needs the £250 million. It has 12 months to repay it. Gatwick still has the option of accessing a further £50 million under its £300million CCFF facility. The airport had a £344 million pre-tax loss for the six months to June 2020.  During 2020 its number of passenger numbers fell by about 80%. It is owned by France’s VINCI Airports and $71billion fund GIP, which should be able to provide money Gatwick needs.  Local community group GACC says, despite the airport’s dire financial state, it is still finding money to spend on expansion plans which will have major adverse consequences for local residents & would also fly in the face of climate change concerns.
.

 

Gatwick increased its Government borrowing by £75m over the last week to shore up its finances during the extended travel shutdown

By HARRIET DENNYS, FINANCIAL MAIL ON SUNDAY

23 January 2021

Gatwick Airport increased its Government borrowing by £75million over the last week to shore up its finances during the extended travel shutdown.

According to documents seen by The Mail on Sunday, the latest financing means Gatwick has borrowed £250million under the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF) scheme.

Gatwick applied to access the CCFF in August, saying at the time it was a contingency measure and hoped not to touch the money.

Grounded: Gatwick, owned by France’s VINCI Airports and $71billion fund GIP, still has the option of accessing a further £50 million under its £300million CCFF facility

However, the lockdowns and travel restrictions have led to a situation where Gatwick has now accessed a total of £250million – and has 12 months to repay it.

A spokeswoman confirmed the loan had been drawn down ‘to preserve liquidity and protect the business while there is ongoing uncertainty regarding the length of time’ of the current air travel restrictions.

She added: ‘This loan gives the business some flexibility in case the state of affairs regarding international travel deteriorates further.’

Gatwick, Britain’s second biggest airport, cut 600 jobs last year. It posted a £344million pre-tax loss for the six months to June as passenger numbers fell by two-thirds.

The airport is currently operating from just the North Terminal, last week running just 20 to 30 flights a day, for around 1,000 passengers.

Before the pandemic, it was the world’s biggest single-runway airport. But last year, passengers were down 80 per cent on average compared with 2019, as airlines scaled back or suspended flights. And this month, Norwegian Air said it was closing its long-haul base at Gatwick, making 1,100 staff redundant.

The Mail on Sunday understands Norwegian is now dismantling its fleet of 35 Boeing 787 Dreamliner transatlantic jets, which will be sold or returned to leasing firms. Karen Dee, chief executive of the Airport Operators Association, warned last week airports could have to shut temporarily. There is speculation UK borders could be shut completely as soon as this week.

Paul Charles, chief executive of travel consultancy The PC Agency, said the restrictions could lead to several airlines going bust.

Gatwick last night urged the Government to announce ‘a comprehensive support package for aviation’.

It added: ‘It is vital that critical national infrastructure such as airports are able to thrive and provide the international connectivity required to ensure Britain remains open for trade and business.’

https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-9179223/Gatwick-increases-Government-borrowing-75m.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490

.

.


See earlier:

 

Gatwick investors say they will put in the money to develop its emergency runway for routine use

VINCI Airports and infrastructure fund GIP say they have committed to funding the next stage of a scheme to upgrade Gatwick’s ‘standby’ northern runway, for routine use. That would add around 90 extra flights per day. The northern runway is currently short, and is used as an emergency runway.  It is too close to the main runway to be used independently, for safety reasons.  But it could take short-haul planes in gaps between use of the main runway.  Gatwick – struggling with the impact of the Covid pandemic – says it will now develop the development consent order (DCO) application for the project, including environmental surveys. The airport intends to launch a public consultation this summer.  Gatwick’s biggest airline customers – BA, easyJet, Norwegian and Virgin Atlantic – have suspended or scaled back flights, or moved some to Heathrow.  Gatwick hopes passenger traffic will recover fast, once vaccination against Covid makes it safer to travel, with traffic back to the level in 2019 by 2023.  Gatwick claims the runway will not add to carbon emissions (as it does not include the emissions from flights). The CCC has said there should be no net airport expansion in the UK. If an airport expands, another should therefore contract.

Click here to view full story…

Read more »

Crowding, no social distancing, potential “superspreader” events at Heathrow terminal

Passengers at Heathrow have been publicising just how much risk there is of spreading Covid at the airport. There are huge queues, with hundreds of people waiting for considerable times, close together in areas with inadequate ventilation.  Heathrow says the additional Covid checks for arriving passengers have resulted in the long queues.  It is possible these crowded times in Heathrow terminals are “superspreading” events.  An image of a packed queue at Terminal 2 shared on social media went viral, with many questioning where the passengers have been travelling from (far too many on inessential leisure trips) and why they did not appear to be following social distancing rules. A spokesperson for Heathrow said the airport has always maintained that social distancing is not possible at the airport and face coverings were mandated for all passengers aged 11 and above. One passenger said: “Isn’t the UK in lockdown? Seeing this I would say not, as it looks like everybody is off on their essential travel!”  All international arrivals, including UK nationals, have to show proof of a negative Covid-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure (ie. wholly inadequate protection for the UK).
.

 


By contrast, the advice from Heathrow, in its “Fly Safe” page implies how safe it is.   It states:   “In the UK, the Government advises to keep a safe distance and there are signs and stickers on the floor throughout the airport.”  (ie. not that Heathrow is actually doing this). And “We are doing everything we can to reduce the impact of COVID-19 and get you on your way safely.”

And here they say: 
“Social Distancing
The latest advice in the UK is to keep a safe distance we have signs and floor stickers to help you keep your distance. We recommend the length of a baggage trolley to help with maintaining a good distance.”

 

Boris Johnson hints at tighter border rules, saying ‘we may need to go further’ to limit Covid spread

Tighter entry checks mean longer queues, says Heathrow after ‘superspreading’ complaint goes viral

Passengers complain of delays at borders due to additional Covid checks

By Kate Ng (The Independent)

23.1.2021

Additional Covid checks for passengers arriving into Heathrow have resulted in lengthy queues at the border, with members of the public raising concerns over the potential for more “superspreading” events.

 

Tweet by Peter Westmacott,  ex-ambassador.  “T2 Heathrow Friday afternoon. No ventilation. Long delays. Superspreading.”

4:43 PM · Jan 22, 2021 

Image

An image of a packed queue at Terminal 2 shared on social media went viral, with many questioning where the passengers have been travelling from and why they did not appear to be following social distancing rules.

Peter Westmacott, former British ambassador to Turkey, France and the US, posted the photo of the queue in the airport on Friday afternoon on Twitter, adding: “No ventilation. Long delays. Superspreading.”

However, a spokesperson for Heathrow said the airport has always maintained that social distancing is not possible within an airport environment, and face coverings were mandated for all passengers aged 11 and above since last summer.

One person commented on the photo: “How is this happening? I thought we were in lockdown and our borders were shut. I haven’t been further than our local supermarket (which is 1km away) in weeks!”

Another said: “Isn’t the UK in lockdown? Seeing this I would say not, as it looks like everybody is off on their essential travel!”

Long queues at the border began developing at the start of the week, when extra requirements for travellers entering the UK came into force. The UK has not banned all international flights, but travel corridors have been suspended and most arrivals must go into quarantine 10 days, but this can be reduced if they test negative for Covid-19 after five days.

All international arrivals, including UK nationals, are required to present proof of a negative Covid-19 test taken within 72 hours before their departure. They must also present a passenger locator form, which must be completed before arriving in the UK.

The paperwork is being checked by both airlines and Border Force officials in an effort to avoid the import of new strains of coronavirus. Passengers who fail to comply with the new rules will be handed a £500 fine.

Earlier this week, passengers arriving into Heathrow claimed there were not enough staff at the border to go through the new paperwork and ensure queues moved smoothly, moved smoothly, reported the Daily Mail.

But the Home Office said such claims were untrue, adding that “even with the increased Border Force spot checks on arrival, with passengers liable for a fine of £500 for failing to comply with the new rules, the vast majority of people have been moving through the UK border in good time”.

Complaints about queues at the border come as Boris Johnson hinted that the government may have to introduce more restrictions to stop new variants of Covid-19 from spreading in the UK.

Speaking at Friday’s Downing Street press conference, the prime minister said: “I really don’t rule out that we may need to take further measures still, we may need to go further to protect our borders because we do not want, after all the effort that we’re going to in this country… to put that at risk by having a new variant come back in.”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/heathrow-queues-border-checks-social-distancing-b1791514.html

.

.

.

 

Read more »

Dublin Airport wants permission to amend planning conditions for more night period flights

Dublin airport is constructing a new runway, which is expected to open in 2022. It had been intended to open in 2020. The current conditions would limit the use of the new northern runway between 11pm and 7am, and also place an overall limit of 65 aircraft movements across the entire airport during those hours. Now the Dublin Airport operator, DAA, has submitted an application to Fingal County Council for permission to amend two planning conditions that are due to apply to the operation of the new north runway and the overall runway system at Dublin Airport when the new north runway begins operations.  It says the conditions are too “onerous” now wants to be able to operate a noise quota system between 11.30pm and 6am, ie. half an hour later into the night, and an hour earlier in the morning. Flights would operate for longer times than the quota period.  The DAA says the new north runway would only be used between 6am and midnight, (ie. 2 hours longer than the 7am to 11pm originally) and it says the overall effects of nighttime aircraft noise are “less than envisaged under the planning permission granted in 2007, and do not exceed those in 2018.”  The DAA is very keen to have flights between 6am and 7am, which is their “busiest time of the day.”
.

 

Dublin Airport operator, DAA, Submits Application For Permission To Amend Planning Conditions For New Dublin Airport Runway

Dec 22nd 2020 (Hospitality Ireland)

Dublin Airport operator DAA has submitted an application to Fingal County Council for permission to amend two planning conditions that are due to apply to the operation of the new north runway and the overall runway system at Dublin Airport when the new north runway begins operations.

The current conditions would limit the use of the north runway between 11pm and 7am, and also place an overall limit of 65 aircraft movements across the entire airport during those hours.

In its newly lodged planning application, DAA proposes the introduction of a noise quota system at night, which would operate between 11.30pm and 6am, and that the north runway would only be used between 6am and midnight.

In a statement published on the Dublin Airport and DAA websites, DAA CEO Dalton Philips said, “We had originally wanted to have these two onerous conditions removed entirely, but having engaged with the local community and listened to their views, we have revised our previous position and are now proposing very significant mitigation measures.”

DAA said that under its new proposals, the overall effects of nighttime noise at Dublin Airport are less than envisaged under the planning permission granted in 2007, and do not exceed those in 2018.

Within the planning application, DAA also proposes a new €7 million insulation scheme for dwellings that are most affected by nighttime noise. The proposed scheme would see grants of €20,000 paid to the owners of up to 350 eligible houses.

DAA has already established an insulation programme for approximately 200 local households as well as a voluntary scheme to purchase up to 38 properties that will be most affected by the operation of the north runway at a significant premium to their market value if the runway was not being built.

Philips asserted, “The new proposal balances the requirements of the Irish economy with the valid concerns of the local community.

“It has never been Dublin Airport’s intention to have lots more flights in the middle of the night, but in their original form, the two conditions would have a very significant impact on Ireland’s connectivity, as the hour between 6am and 7am is Dublin Airport’s busiest time of the day.”

According to Philips, the proposed new measures would provide Dublin Airport with “the operational flexibility that is required to help the Irish economy recover from the impact of COVID-19 and face the challenges of a post-Brexit environment, while ensuring that the effects of nighttime noise that were envisaged by the original planning conditions are not exceeded.”

Competent Authority

Under new legislation that came into effect last year, a separate part of Fingal County has been appointed the competent authority for the purposes of noise regulation at Dublin Airport.

Under the legislation, the competent authority will apply what is known as the balanced approach to address the issue of noise at the airport. Under the balanced approach, three key elements must be considered before contemplating operating restrictions. The three key elements that must be considered are reduction of noise at source, land-use planning and management, and noise abatement operational procedures. According to DAA, only after these three elements have been exhausted, should the fourth element of the Balanced Approach – operating restrictions – be considered.

The competent authority has a 14-week public consultation period within its deliberations and its decision is incorporated within the overall planning decision. This decision can be appealed to An Bord Pleanála. When making its decision, it will take into account the views of the community, the aviation sector and other stakeholders, as well as international best practice.

Runway Construction Timeline

Construction of the new runway will be largely completed in the second quarter of next year and this will be followed by a rigorous period of testing and commissioning. The runway is expected to be operational in 2022.

https://www.hospitalityireland.com/general-industry/daa-submits-application-for-permission-to-amend-planning-conditions-for-new-dublin-airport-runway-117635

.


See earlier:

 

Work to build Dublin 2nd runway could start in 2017 for completion in 2020

.


Local residents not at all happy about noise plan for Dublin airport

Some residents living under flight paths of Dublin Airport are unhappy that a new plan is not adopting World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines on permitted noise levels for aircraft.  Fingal county council will become the noise regulator for the airport under proposals drawn up by transport minister Shane Ross. Fingal county council submitted a draft 5-year noise action plan for the airport to the Environmental Protection Agency last week. The public made more than 50 submissions in the consultation period, and most queried why new (October 2018) WHO noise guidelines were not adopted. WHO  guidelines say that average noise exposure from aircraft should be limited to 45 decibels during daylight hours and 40 decibels at night. The council’s plan sets no limits for noise and instead focuses on mitigation measures. In the UK the WHO noise guidelines are not followed either – nowhere even approaching them. The number of people exposed to plane noise of 55-60 decibels was over 18,000 in 2016, and that is likely to rise due to more activity at the airport and more housing built near it.  Fingal council said it is awaiting national or EU-led policy guidance on noise levels. Construction of the new 2nd runway, for yet more flights, is due to be completed in early 2021 and commissioning will then take place. 

https://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2019/01/local-residents-not-at-all-happy-about-noise-plan-for-dublin-airport/

.

.

.

Read more »

Hillingdon Council’s new leader, Ian Edwards, pledges to continue fight against Heathrow 3rd runway and HS2

Hillingdon Council (15th January) has appointed Councillor Ian Edwards as new leader of the local authority.  He replaces London and Hillingdon’s longest serving council leader, Cllr Ray Puddifoot, who announced he was stepping down in October last year after 20 years of service.  Sir Ray said:  “As I step down tonight I do so in the knowledge that that Hillingdon Council has the administration, resources and first class staff which will see this council and our residents through the current pandemic and beyond.”  Cllr Edwards, who also replaced Cllr Puddifoot as Conservative group leader, pledged to continue defending the borough’s environment and residents against a 3rd runway at Heathrow, and mitigate the impact of HS2.
.

 

 

Hillingdon Council’s new leader pledges to continue fight against Heathrow 3rd runway and HS2

Ian Edwards replaces London and Hillingdon’s longest-serving council leader Sir Ray Puddifoot

18.1.2021   (My London)

Hillingdon Council has appointed councillor Ian Edwards as new leader of the local authority.

Cllr Edwards replaces London and Hillingdon’s longest serving council leader, cllr Ray Puddifoot, who announced he was stepping down in October last year after 20 years of service.

In the transition which took place in a virtual full council meeting on January 15, Sir Ray paid tribute to officers, his Conservative colleagues, residents and the Labour opposition as he stepped down at a time Hillingdon Council is recognised as “one of the best councils in the country”.

He added: “As an organisation that I leave as leader tonight it’s unrecognisable from the council I was elected to lead in the year 2000…

“As I step down tonight I do so in the knowledge that that Hillingdon Council has the administration resources and first class staff which will see this council and our residents through the current pandemic and beyond.”

A number of councillors including opposition leader Peter Curling, Ickenham councillor and MP for Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner, David Simmonds, and deputy leader Jonathan Bianco, paid tribute to the outgoing leader, while education chief cllr Susan O’Brien said cllr Edwards had “big boots to fill”.

Cllr Edwards, who also replaced cllr Puddifoot as Conservative group leader, vowed to residents that despite the leadership change, there will be “no change” in the services delivered.

He pledged to continue defending the borough’s environment and residents against a third runway at Heathrow, and mitigate the impact of HS2, while he shared a vision for more innovation at the council, and a focus on young people.

“Just as we developed and implemented a strategy to support older people to deliver better in lives in Hillingdon, so we will find better ways to better help our young people and young families to reach their full potential,” he said.

“The availability and standard of housing presents a challenge that we will confront and my intention is to increase the supply of affordable housing.”

But he also committed that the present priority is beating the pandemic, supporting residents and businesses and working with health partners to help “return to normal as quickly as possible”.

He was first elected to the council in 2014, representing Yiewsley, before becoming a ward member for Eastcote and East Ruislip in 2018.

He previously worked as a chief officer at Hillingdon Council for three years, and served 30 years in the police force, retiring as the borough commander for Richmond in 2007.

The new cabinet under Cllr Edwards was also approved at the meeting. Members such as cllr O’Brien, cllr Bianco and health chief cllr Jane Palmer have stayed on after serving in cllr Puddifoot’s cabinet, while new members such as cllr Martin Goddard will take on the finance portfolio.

There was also a committee chairs shake-up, with former cabinet member for planning and transport cllr Keith Burrows, appointed as chair of the influential executive scrutiny committee.

Calls from the Labour group to have opposition leader cllr Curling lead the body were rejected by the new leader.

Speaking after the meeting, Labour councillor Kerri Prince, hit out at the decision, saying: “Choosing someone from your own pool of supporters to take on a key role which holds you to account will prevent transparency and accountability.”

Cllr Puddifoot was also appointed as the council’s champion for the armed forces, and will continue to serve as an Ickenham ward councillor until the next election in May 2022.

https://www.mylondon.news/news/west-london-news/hillingdon-councils-new-leader-pledges-19646182

.

.

.

 

Read more »

UK airports to receive financial aid from government before April

The UK Government has said it will financially support airports before the end of March, following the aviation industry’s fervent plea for support due to the new Covid travel restrictions.  Aviation minister Robert Courts said: “The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme will help airports reduce their costs and we will be aiming to provide grants before the end of this financial year.” (ie. April).  Without any initial date, the scheme was announced in November 2020 for the first time. Under the scheme, grants of up to £8m per airport applying will be given to cover fixed costs such as business rates. More details are expected in the coming days. The lobby body, the Airport Operators’s Association, wants help including a temporary exemption from local property taxes, and help with “regulatory, policing and air traffic control expenses.”  Robert Courts did not mention any support for airlines, which have benefited from general government furlough programmes; BA and EasyJet have had loans backed by the government’s UK Export Finance. The sector wants restrictions ended by Easter, which is when they usually make money, and for the summer holiday season. Most airlines do not traditionally make much of their money in winter.
.

 

 

UK airports to receive financial aid from government

18 January 2021  (AirportTechnology.com)

The UK Government has announced that it will financially support the country’s airports before the end of March, following the aviation industry’s fervent plea for support due to the new Covid-19 travel restrictions.

Aviation minister Robert Courts informed about the government’s plan to introduce a new support programme, called Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme, this month.

The UK Government has announced that it will financially support the country’s airports before the end of March, following the aviation industry’s fervent plea for support due to the new Covid-19 travel restrictions.

Aviation minister Robert Courts announced the government’s plan to introduce a new support programme, called Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme, this month.

Taking to social media, Courts announced: “The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme will help airports reduce their costs and we will be aiming to provide grants before the end of this financial year.”

Without any initial date, the scheme was announced in November 2020 for the first time.

Under the scheme, grants of up to £8m per applicant will be given for covering fixed costs such as business rates.

More details in connection with the scheme will be disclosed in the coming days.

Gatwick Airport said that the aid will help in preserving jobs at a time when passenger footfall has dropped drastically due to the ongoing pandemic, reported Reuters.

Before the announcement, Airport Operators Association chief executive Karen Dee said that the administration had to move beyond existing support, including a momentary exemption from local property taxes.

Dee added: “Relief from regulatory, policing and air traffic control expenses would help.”

No support for airlines was cited by Courts, which have benefited from general government furlough programmes but have obtained some direct backing.

Airlines UK chief executive Tim Alderslade has also called for relaxation on travel rules by Easter, before the peak holiday period of spring and summer.

Alderslade was quoted by Reuters as saying: “Airlines have been staying in business by taking on billions of pounds of debt, which will need to be paid back.”

According to new rules starting at 4am GMT on 18 January, all travellers to Britain will be required to test negative for Covid-19 three days prior to travel.

They will also have to undergo home quarantine for ten days on arrival.

Recently, a ban on passengers from South America, Portugal and Cape Verde came into force after a new variant was identified in Brazil.

https://www.airport-technology.com/news/uk-airports-financial-aid-government/

.


See earlier:

Chancellor’s business rates subsidy of £8 million covers just 7% of Heathrow’s £120m bill

Heathrow is angry that it is having to pay most of its business rates, while supermarkets and many other businesses are given a 100% waiver.  The government has given airports a subsidy of up to £8 million each this year, to pay their business rates. That is enough to cover the whole amount, for small airports. But Heathrow says it only covers 7% of their rates bill, of almost £120 million, part of which it pays to Hillingdon Borough Council. Heathrow is struggling with a drop of around 82% in its passenger number. It is having to furlough its entire senior management team except its chief executive, to cut costs. Gatwick is probably due to pay £29m in business rates this year, while Manchester and Stansted face bills of £14m and £12m respectively, so the £8 million will not cover their rates bills either. Supermarkets have been given around £1.9 billion in rates help, because initially it was feared there could be problems with food supply. In fact supermarkets have done very well out of Covid, with less food eaten out of the home. Chancellor Rishi Sunak said: “… we have supported them throughout this crisis through the job retention scheme, loans and tax deferrals.” 

https://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2020/11/chancellors-business-rates-subsidy-of-8-million-covers-just-7-of-heathrows-120m-bill/
.
.

In November, the airports to benefit from the package were:

Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bristol
Carlisle
Doncaster Sheffield
East Midlands
Exeter
Gatwick
Heathrow
Humberside
Isles Of Scilly
Lands End
Leeds Bradford
Liverpool John Lennon
London City
Luton
Manchester
Newcastle
Newquay
Norwich
Southampton
Southend
Stansted
Teesside International Airport

.

.

 

Read more »

Estimates of some of the Covid job losses in the aerospace and airline sector

Some numbers of the job losses by airports, airlines and plane manufacturers, caused by the Covid pandemic.  These numbers are often estimates and will need to be updated, depending on how long Covid travel restrictions continue, and how much financial help the sector gets from government, or what loans it can obtain.
.

 

Biggest jobs cuts in the UK aerospace and aviation industry

Airbus – 1,700 jobs
Airbus is to cut 15,000 jobs globally as the plane-maker slashes staff numbers to match the collapse in demand for new aircraft. Of these jobs, some 1,700 will go in the UK.

Boeing – 26,000 jobs (globally)
UK engineering giant Boeing, heavily disrupted by the devastation wrought across the aviation sector, announced plans to make 7,000 more job cuts after counting a $3.5bn (£2.7bn) loss for the three months to the end of September.

British Airways – up to 12,000
British Airways is to shed as many as 12,000 jobs after plunging to its worst ever quarterly loss and admitting air travel will take years to recover from a global collapse.

Irish airline Aer Lingus, hich is also part of IAG, along with BA and Iberia, has been forced to cut 900 jobs.

EasyJet – 1,900 jobs
EasyJet is axing 1,900 jobs in the UK, including 727 pilots and 1,200 cabin staff. The FTSE 250 company is pushing the cuts through as part of plans to lay off nearly one in three of its 15,000 workers.

Ryanair – 3,000 jobs
Ryanair has also warned it may cut 3,000 jobs as it wrestles with the devastating impact of coronavirus, however most of these will be in Ireland.

Emirates – unknown
A leaked email seen by The Telegraph showed bosses at Emirates told their 600-strong British staff that it had to “consider reducing the size of the UK workforce”.

Gatwick – 600 jobs
Gatwick airport is to cut up to 600 jobs in response to the “devastating impact” of Covid-19. The redundancies, which represent almost a quarter of the airport’s workforce, come as passenger numbers fell 80pc in August.

Heathrow Airport – up to 25,000 jobs
Heathrow Airport chief John Holland-Kaye said that a third of the 76,000 people employed at the airport could be made redundant as it battles to stem losses following a huge collapse in air travel.

Manchester Airports Group – 900 jobs  (Stansted, Manchester, East Midlands airports)
Britain’s biggest airport owner, Manchester Airports Group, has warned its staff of plans to axe nearly 900 jobs due to the pandemic.

Norwegian Air – 1,100 jobs
In January 2021 Norwegian Air slashed 1,100 jobs at its Gatwick Airport base as it abandoned long-haul flights. Inste ad the airline – Gatwick’s third largest – will focus on short-haul European flights as thepandemic curbed its ambitions to expand in a bid to survive.

Virgin Atlantic – 4,150 jobs
Virgin Atlantic plans to cut another 1,000 jobs on top of the more than 3,150 jobs it announced four months earlier. The airline has been fighting to secure its future since the Covid-19 pandemic brought scheduled passenger services to a standstill. Ministers snubbed a request for a £500m state loan in April.

from  the Telegraph  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/01/18/airports-fume-help-simply-not-enough/

Luton airport – perhaps 250 jobs?   See link

Birmingham airport – at least 250 jobs?  See link 

Edinburgh airport – at least 250 jobs?   See link

Loganair – perhaps 165 jobs at Scottish airports.  See link

and probably other job losses at the UK’s smaller airports.

.

.

.

Read more »

Eastleigh Council may make decision on Southampton runway extension in March

A final decision by Eastleigh Council, on plans to lengthen the runway by 164 metres (538ft)  at Southampton Airport, could be made by March. The aim is to be able to accommodate larger planes, such as A320s and Boeing 737s for yet more holiday flights, to yet more destinations.  The airport said it expects “to submit additional information regarding its runway extension application to Eastleigh Borough Council later this month. A new public consultation will then follow.”  A council decision, after the consultation, could be by mid-March. Opponents are very aware that the extension will negatively impact the area due to increased noise, and there will be increased carbon emissions. At the start of December 2020 Southampton City Council objected to the proposals on the grounds of noise and climate change.  The airport had around 1.78 million passengers in 2019 (barely higher than in 2009, though the peak was around 2 million in 2017. It hopes to get 3 million annual passengers by 2033. 
.

 

 

Date set for final decision on long-running Southampton Airport runway expansion saga

Similar plans have already been rejected once, on noise and climate change grounds

15.1.2021

By Maria Zaccaro, Local Democracy Reporter   Hampshire Live 

A final decision on plans to expand the runway at Southampton Airport could be made by March, it has been revealed.

The proposals to expand the runway by 164m (538ft) were expected to be discussed in December last year. The expansion of the runway would accommodate planes such as the Airbus 320 and Boeing 737.

But the final decision on the scheme was pushed back as airport bosses asked to add further information to the plans.

Members of the Eastleigh Local Area Committee will be asked to make a decision on the controversial scheme.

In a statement a spokesperson for the airport said: “Southampton Airport expect to submit additional information regarding its runway extension application to Eastleigh Borough Council later this month.

“A new public consultation will then follow, where the local community and stakeholders will again be invited to share their feedback on its updated proposals ahead of a committee decision, which we anticipate will be in mid-March.”

The news comes as the plans proved to be controversial and sparked a heated debate among residents and Hampshire leaders.

Airport bosses previously said the airport’s future would be in doubt if the plans are rejected.

But campaigners raised concerns over the impact of the runway extension on climate change, noise and the environment.

Last year Southampton City Council objected to the proposals on the grounds of noise and climate change.

Last year Southampton Airport amended the original proposals following a number of public consultations.

Among the main changes were proposals to cap the airport’s growth up to three million passengers per year by 2033.

The airport also proposed to increase the financial support for acoustic insulation to nearby households to £5,000.

But campaigners opposed to the scheme saying it would “cause huge harm to the environment and local people”.

Managing director at Southampton Airport Steve Szalay previously said thousands of jobs and the future of the airport would be hanging in the balance if the plans are rejected.

Business leaders in Hampshire backed the proposals saying “the certainty of the planning permission is essential for the future”.

https://www.hampshirelive.news/news/hampshire-news/date-set-final-decision-long-4893609

.


See earlier:

Southampton City Council objects to latest plans by Southampton airport – Eastleigh BC to consider on 17th December

Southampton City Council has objected to revised plans to expand the runway at Southampton airport by 164 metres (538 ft), in order to increase the number of flights and size of planes.  The council voted to oppose the scheme on the grounds of climate change and noise levels.  The city council had previously voted to oppose the airport’s original plans in January. The airport was asked to amend the proposals and Southampton council was asked to confirm its position before a final decision is taken by councillors in Eastleigh – where the airport is located. The latest plans have a few small noise modifications.  Lyn Bryshaw, from the Airport Expansion Opposition group told the online council meeting the development would “cause huge harm to the environment and local people  …The economic benefits for Southampton and the region have been overstated and no evidence at all has been presented to suggest that the airport would go out of business without the extension.” A decision on planning permission is due to be made on 17 December, by Eastleigh Borough Council.

Click here to view full story…

Southampton Airport extended runway plans to be debated on 17th December

Plans to expand Southampton Airport runway will be considered by Eastleigh Council on 17th December. The airport wants to extend its runway by 164m (538ft) and extend the existing long stay car park to provide an additional 600 spaces. The proposals will be scrutinised at a special meeting of the Eastleigh Local Area Committee. The airport has recently submitted more details of the plans to the council. These include the possibility for the authority to propose a maximum noise cap on the airport. Local opposition group Airport Expansion Opposition (AXO) continue to campaign against the plans. As well as the carbon emissions, they fear that new government policy could mean that there would be no noise cap in the future. The airport claims the longer runway is necessary, to keep airport staff employed, as the longer runway would allow larger Airbus 320 and Boeing 737 planes, for holiday destinations in southern Europe. The airport hopes the extended runway could be ready by 2022.  The public consultation will close on November 15. Nearby Winchester Council has said it is still likely to object to the plans, and the recently updated information do not overcome their concerns about the noise impact.

Click here to view full story…

Protest by opponents of Southampton airport, against the “madness” of its expansion plans

Opponents of expansion of Southampton airport took part in a protest on Saturday 29th, as did many other groups at airports across the UK.  The group say the airport should not be expanding, at a time of climate crisis, and the impact would be a needless increase in carbon emissions, from the extra flights using the airport.  They said  1. The economic case does not stack up, in jobs, house prices or health impacts.  2. The noise impacts of expansion, with many more local people negatively affected.  3. More air pollution will affect local health and mortality rates, from an increase (the airport’s own figures) of 272%  in NOx emissions. 4. No figures have been provided for ultrafine particles, which could be even worse than NOx for human health.  5.  The expansion will contribute to climate change and a ‘carbon-neutral’ airport is a myth; the expansion would roughly double current carbon emissions, and the airport is only looking to offset the relatively small ground emissions, not those from flights.

Click here to view full story…

Southampton airport runway extension plans would lead to higher CO2 emissions

Plans to lengthen Southampton Airport’s runway (by 164 metres) have come under fire amid concerns over their impact on climate change. The airport’s 2nd public consultation on revised plans has now been launched. Local campaigners Airport Expansion Opposition (AXO) said: “A ‘carbon-neutral’ airport’ is like ‘fat-free lard’. It’s just not possible. We need to act now on climate change.  Lower carbon fuels and electric planes capable of carrying significant numbers of passengers are decades away. The airport says extending the runway isn’t about ‘bigger planes’. But its own figures show that it is about flying many more of the bigger, noisier A320 jets than previously. The result of this is, as the new documents show, over 40,000 extra local people being exposed to aircraft noise.” And “Regional connectivity can be maintained with the airport as it currently is, and since most travellers are UK residents heading out on holiday most of the benefit of their travel will be abroad.” The airport claims its future is in doubt (usual stuff about jobs…) unless it lengthens the runway.

Click here to view full story…

 

.

 

Read more »

Norwegian is ending its low-cost long-haul flights, to focus on European routes only

Norwegian Air says it is ending its long-haul operation, and end its plans for low-cost long distance flying. It had to ground most of its fleet throughout 2020 – its long-haul Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets have not been used since March.  Even before Covid, it long-haul flights (to the US, Argentina and Brazil) at stupidly low prices were not making money, and Norwegian had financial troubles.  In 2013, after 20 years as a standard short-haul carrier, it had its first  budget transatlantic flights – firstly from Oslo, and in 2014 from Gatwick. One-way economy fares between the UK and US cost from just £125. For that price there was no free check-in baggage, or food or drink.  The first flight between Gatwick and Seattle cost £150. Gatwick was its long-haul base in the UK. In 2019, it flew more passengers between the US and UK than any other airline, to 12 US destinations. Margins were very tight, and the airline had rising debt in 2019. By April 2020, 80% of its staff were on furlough. So there will be no long-haul flights by Norwegian at Gatwick, but their flights to European destinations will continue.
.

The rise and fall of Norwegian Air, leader of the low-cost transatlantic revolution

The pandemic, perhaps, isn’t entirely to blame. So where did it all go wrong?

By Hazel Plush, SENIOR CONTENT EDITOR (The Telegraph) 
14 January 2021

Norwegian Air has announced the end of its long-haul operation, a move which will axe around 1,100 jobs in the UK alone – and bring an end to one of commercial aviation’s most ambitious grand-plans.

Like all airlines, the Oslo-based carrier has been hit hard by the pandemic, forced to ground most of its fleet throughout 2020 – its long-haul Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets entirely unused since March. Now, it seems, the writing on the wall can be ignored no longer.

“Future demand remains highly uncertain,” reads a statement from the airline. “Under these circumstances, a long-haul operation is not viable for Norwegian and these operations will not continue.”

Customers with affected bookings will be contacted directly, and refunded.

It has done well, perhaps, to make it this far. Even pre-pandemic, the airline’s long-haul offering was suffering financial turbulence – despite it seemingly flying high. But this ruinous 12 months has unravelled even the most robust business models; and low-cost carriers have borne the brunt.

Before Covid hit, Norwegian was among the world’s major transatlantic carriers, flying between Europe and the US, Argentina and Brazil. To achieve such popularity, it did what the likes of British Airways and American Airlines couldn’t, or at least wouldn’t: offered long-haul routes for ludicrously low prices.

In 2013, after 20 years as a reputable short-haul carrier, the first of its budget transatlantic flights departed – firstly from Oslo, and in 2014 from London Gatwick. One-way economy fares between the UK and US cost from just £125.

“You didn’t get much leg room, or any free check-in baggage, or any free food or drink for that matter,” recalls Greg Dickinson, who was on board Norwegian’s inaugural flight between Gatwick and Seattle, with an economy ticket price of $199 (£150).

But despite the cramped conditions, spirits on board were high: “There was a celebratory atmosphere in the air, particularly among the Norwegian staff, for this marked yet another brave step in the low-cost airline’s mission to break the stranglehold that airlines like British Airways and Virgin Atlantic had on routes to North America.”

The plan worked. Over the coming years, Norwegian’s was an oft-sighted livery on the tarmac at Gatwick, its long-haul base in the UK. In 2018, it overtook British Airways as the largest non-US carrier to serve the UK and New York. And in 2019, it outstripped the competition entirely: it transported more passengers between the US and UK than any other airline, flying to an impressive 12 US destinations.

By the end of that year, it had expanded into South America too – and become the world’s fifth-largest low-cost airline. But margins were tight, and the airline’s ascent was fuelled by rising debt, leaving many to predict that Norwegian was close to collapse.

Then, of course, the pandemic hit. Air travel ground to a halt.

By April 2020, just seven of Norwegian’s 147 airframes were in service – and 80 per cent of its staff were on furlough. It had secured a £250million state bail-out, but warned that its fleet could remain grounded until 2021: a headline-grabbing statement at the time, yet one that has proved all-too prescient.

In 2020, there were barely any short-haul services required, let alone long-haul routes. The airline pivoted to cargo-only operations, and appealed for further Norwegian Government bail-outs – but they failed. The refusal was “a slap in the face”, said Jacob Schram, the airline’s chief executive. He promised “to turn every stone” to secure a rescue from the private sector.

But now, as the pandemic’s grip on aviation shows little sign of abating, Norwegian will fly long-haul no longer. In a statement released today, Schram speaks of a simplified business structure and dedicated short haul network – and the end of its transatlantic ambitions, for now.

“Our short haul network has always been the backbone of Norwegian and will form the basis of a future resilient business model,” said Schram. “It is with a heavy heart that we must accept that this will impact dedicated colleagues from across the company.”

The job losses at its Gatwick base total 1,100 – and there will also be significant staffing cuts in Italy, France and the US.

And the packing-up has already begun. The airline has started flying Dreamliners from its Scandinavian bases to Ireland’s Shannon Airport, in preparation for them being returned to lessors, reports Aerotime Hub. From an airline that once roared with ambition, it feels like a quiet, crumbling defeat.

The long-haul budget dream is over – until, perhaps, we can dare to dream again.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/news/rise-fall-norwegian-air-leader-low-cost-transatlantic-revolution/

.


See earlier:

Norwegian Air faces ‘very uncertain future’ after further state aid from Norway denied

The Norwegian government has refused to grant further financial assistance to Norwegian Air. It was bailed out in the spring, through state aid from Norway of 3bn krone (£255m), with stringent conditions attached, after the first wave of the grounding of airlines due to Covid.  Now with the return of Covid across Europe, air travel demand is not returning for this winter, so Norwegian’s finances are in a grim state.  But the Oslo government is not giving more money. The airline has, in the past, annoyed trade unions in Norway for using cheaper, foreign labour. It said it would now be forced to furlough another 1,600 staff, leaving only 600 employed out of more than 10,000 people at the start of the pandemic. It said it would park all but 6 aircraft (out of its fleet of 100 planes) and operate only domestic routes through the winter.  It was flying from 6 UK airports, with its base at Gatwick. As well as cheap European leisure flights, it offered cheap trans-Atlantic routes. Before Covid it was one of the biggest airlines at Gatwick. Norwegian is fragile, as it has expanded too fast in recent years, and has a lot fo debt.  The airline is expected to have losses of 5.3bn krone (about £450m) for the first half of 2020. 

https://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2020/11/42552/

.


Norwegian Air says most of fleet will stay grounded until 2021, and shareholders will be seriously hit

Norwegian Air says virtually all of its fleet of aircraft will remain grounded until 2021 as it seeks to persuade shareholders (meeting on 4th May) to accept a government-backed rescue plan that will wipe out most of their investments. Bondholders, aircraft lessors and shareholders will have to take a huge cut in profits in order for the airline to get a 3bn kroner (£230m) state bailout. Even that may not be enough, it warned, in its “base scenario”, where operations only restart in earnest next summer. Currently just seven of a fleet of 147 planes are not grounded as they are being used for state-subsidised domestic flights in Norway, mainly for essential cargo.  Its future plans may mean only keeping key profitable routes, ending long-haul routes to secondary airports, with a fleet up to 30% smaller than previously planned. Bondholders will later this week decide whether to accept the strategy and allow the debt to be converted into equity, a necessary move if Norwegian is to gain access to state funds.  Norwegian’s aircraft lessors will also be asked to take equity in the company, rather than pursue debts. The airline is looking to reduce its obligations on leasing planes by £403m. 

https://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2020/04/norwegian-air-says-most-of-fleet-will-stay-grounded-until-2021-and-shareholders-will-be-seriously-hit/
.

.

.

 

Read more »

Heathrow passengers down 72.7% in 2020 (cf. 2019). ATMs down 57.8%. Cargo down 28.2%

Heathrow has published its figures for 2020, which was a year made completely abnormal, by the Covid pandemic.  Heathrow’s number of passengers was 72.7% lower than in 2019, with 22.1 million passengers, compared to 80.9 million in 2019 (ie. 58.8 million fewer).  As planes were less full than usual, with lower load factor, the number of flights (ATMs) was down by 57.8% for the year, compared to 2019 .The amount of cargo carried was down by 28.2%, which Heathrow blames partly on the limited number of passenger planes, the holds of which normally contain cargo.  The largest reduction in air passengers was to North America (79.5% down).  Until Covid, the number of Heathrow passengers rose relentlessly, even though the airport claims it is “full” (it always had extra terminal capacity).  In 2009 it had 65.9 million passengers;  in 2016 it had 75.7 million; in 2017 it had 78.0 million; in 2018 it had 80.0 million; and in 2019 it had 80.9 million.  The number of flights  (ATMs) in 2020 was 200,905; in 2018 was 480,339 and the number in 2019 was 479,811 (the figure is capped at 480,000 per year). 
.

 

Heathrow data for 2020

2020

  • In 2020, 22.1 million passengers travelled through the UK’s only hub airport, down 72.7%. Lockdowns and border closures led to a loss of 58.8 million passengers.
  • ​​​Cargo volumes through Britain’s biggest port, fell 28.2% because of the impact of travel restrictions on international trade. Prior to the pandemic, 94% of cargo travelled in the belly hold of passenger planes, which have been severely reduced.
  • Heathrow worked with airlines and the cargo community to increase dedicated cargo flights, safeguarding the UK’s supply lines throughout the pandemic. Some airlines used passenger aircraft to fly cargo only, helping to transport key essential equipment such as COVID-19 testing kits, PPE and respirators. Over 19,000 cargo-only flights travelled through Heathrow over the course of the year.
  • Heathrow has prioritised health and safety of colleagues and passengers, putting in place a number of measures including UV robots, UV handrail technology, anti-viral wraps, hand sanitiser dispensers, Perspex screens and the mandatory use of face masks.
  • Heathrow has radically reduced costs, while protecting front line roles, by consolidating operations into Terminals 2 and 5 and switching to single runway operations for most of the year. There has been no government support other than the national furlough scheme.

December

  • 1.1 million passengers travelled through Heathrow in December, down 82.9% compared to the same time last year, as a new strain of COVID-19 took its toll on air travel. Heathrow recorded a loss of 5.6 million passengers as many were forced to cancel Christmas and New Year reunions in line with Government guidance.
  • Over 107,000 metric tonnes of cargo travelled through Heathrow in the month of December.
  • Heathrow expanded its airport testing capacity with ExpressTest launching privately operated facilities at the airport and Collinson/Swissport building on their already established sites at Terminals 2 & 5. The move was in response to the Government’s ‘Test to Release’ programme which gives arriving passengers the option to be released from quarantine on day 5, after testing negative for COVID-19.
  • After months of industry-wide calls for pre-departure testing, the Government will soon require all international arrivals to provide proof of a negative Covid-19 test, taken up to 72 hours prior to departure, before travelling to England and Scotland.
  • The Supreme Court ruling in December recognized the robust planning process that will require Heathrow to prove expansion is compliant with the UK’s climate change obligations, including the Paris Climate Agreement, before construction can begin.
  • December was the last month of tax-free shopping in Britain. Britain is the only country in Europe not to offer tax-free shopping to international visitors. A move which threatens to hinder economic recovery and cost livelihoods
  • Heathrow continues to campaign for the adequate business rates relief which has been extended to other sectors, some of which are reporting record profits. The airport continues to face one of the largest bills in the country despite significant losses.

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye said: “The past year has been incredibly challenging for aviation. While we support tightening border controls temporarily by introducing pre-departure testing for international arrivals, as well as quarantine, this is not sustainable.  The aviation industry is the cornerstone of the UK economy but is fighting for survival.  We need a road map out of this lockdown, and a full waiver of business rates.  This is an opportunity for the government to show leadership in creating a Common International Standard for pre-departure testing that will allow travel and trade to restart safely so that we can start to deliver the Prime Minister’s vision of a Global Britain.”

Traffic Summary
December 2020
Terminal Passengers
(000s)
Dec 2020% ChangeJan to
Dec 2020
% ChangeJan 2020 to
Dec 2020
% Change
Market
UK83-79.21,460-69.81,460-69.8
EU348-83.88,052-70.78,052-70.7
Non-EU Europe81-82.91,783-68.71,783-68.7
Africa108-65.31,148-67.31,148-67.3
North America125-92.03,862-79.53,862-79.5
Latin America43-63.6431-68.8431-68.8
Middle East225-69.72,462-68.22,462-68.2
Asia / Pacific131-86.22,911-74.62,911-74.6
Total1,143-82.922,111-72.722,111-72.7
 

 

Air Transport MovementsDec 2020% ChangeJan to
Dec 2020
% ChangeJan 2020 to
Dec 2020
% Change
Market
UK993-70.815,161-62.815,161-62.8
EU3,586-77.982,331-60.782,331-60.7
Non-EU Europe791-77.716,928-61.116,928-61.1
Africa758-44.07,458-51.07,458-51.0
North America2,284-66.134,694-58.434,694-58.4
Latin America320-35.52,962-50.72,962-50.7
Middle East1,502-43.616,636-45.616,636-45.6
Asia / Pacific2,096-46.624,542-48.224,542-48.2
Total12,374-67.7200,905-57.8200,905-57.8
 

 

Cargo
(Metric Tonnes)
Dec 2020% ChangeJan to
Dec 2020
% ChangeJan 2020 to
Dec 2020
% Change
Market
UK5-90.4244-58.5244-58.5
EU8,49222.076,095-19.476,095-19.4
Non-EU Europe5,87535.646,058-19.246,058-19.2
Africa8,57318.069,184-25.969,184-25.9
North America31,607-31.5386,634-31.6386,634-31.6
Latin America3,306-21.333,769-37.933,769-37.9
Middle East18,467-11.9211,637-18.3211,637-18.3
Asia / Pacific30,857-15.0317,640-32.0317,640-32.0
Total107,180-15.11,141,259-28.21,141,259-28.2
 

 

Cargo (incl Charter & Positioning flights)
(Metric Tonnes)
Dec 2020% ChangeJan to
Dec 2020
% ChangeJan 2020 to
Dec 2020
% Change
Market
UK86-14.5550-6.2550-6.2
EU8,60823.676,387-19.176,387-19.1
Non-EU Europe5,89136.046,209-18.946,209-18.9
Africa8,60018.469,925-25.169,925-25.1
North America31,648-31.4386,993-31.5386,993-31.5
Latin America3,321-21.033,820-37.833,820-37.8
Middle East18,561-11.4212,619-17.9212,619-17.9
Asia / Pacific30,890-14.9319,048-31.7319,048-31.7
Total109,392-13.31,150,030-28.01,150,030-28.0
Cargo (incl. Mail, Charter & Positioning flights)
(Metric Tonnes)
Dec 2020% ChangeJan to
Dec 2020
% ChangeJan 2020 to
Dec 2020
% Change
Market
UK86-14.6577-32.3577-32.3
EU9,24610.483,267-21.883,267-21.8
Non-EU Europe6,36029.951,157-18.651,157-18.6
Africa8,65517.870,692-25.370,692-25.3
North America34,562-30.9413,415-30.8413,415-30.8
Latin America3,338-21.534,041-37.934,041-37.9
Middle East19,427-11.5220,474-17.2220,474-17.2
Asia / Pacific32,333-17.0334,164-32.3334,164-32.3
Total114,006-16.11,207,789-28.01,207,789-28.0

 

https://mediacentre.heathrow.com/pressrelease/details/81/Corporate-operational-24/12727

Read more »