Even keen runway supporter, Slough Council, want assurances from Heathrow on damage to borough

Frustrations had been raised at Slough Borough Council (a keen supporter of the 3rd runway) after Heathrow seemingly ignored planning requirements it had set out, that would have ensured a ‘green envelope’ around Colnbrook, into which Heathrow would not intrude. Instead, the consultation set up by Heathrow showed plans for major new road developments within Colnbrook, and a taxiway that was just a few hundred meters from Pippins School. However, council leader, James Swindlehurst, said he had reached agreement with Heathrow that they will ‘review alternatives’ to the currently proposed roads for Colnbrook. They have also agreed to set up a workshop along with the council to explore other options. Heathrow has also announced that they are ‘committed’ to working with Pippins School to mitigate the impact of the expansion. [That probably means very little indeed, in reality].  The airport also pledged funding for a Historic Area Assessment for Colnbrook, which will work to identify buildings and landmarks with historical significance and determine what additional protections they need. [Any protection, other than the only effective one – not to build a massive airport in very close proximity to them]. 
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Negotiations underway to prevent Heathrow intrusion into Colnbrook

20.4.2018

By Greg Taylor (Junior Reporter – Slough Observer)

NEGOTIATIONS are underway to prevent the Heathrow expansion becoming an intrusion.

Frustrations had been raised at Slough Borough Council after Heathrow seemingly ignored planning requirements it had set out, that would have ensured a ‘green envelope’ around Colnbrook, into which Heathrow would not intrude.

Instead, the consultation set up by Heathrow showed plans for major new road developments within Colnbrook, and a taxiway that was just a few hundred meters from Pippins School.

However, council leader, James Swindlehurst, said he had reached agreement with Heathrow that they will ‘review alternatives’ to the currently proposed roads for Colnbrook.

They have also agreed to set up a workshop along with the council to explore other options. Heathrow has also announced that they are ‘committed’ to working with Pippins School to mitigate the impact of the expansion.

The airport also pledged funding for a Historic Area Assessment for Colnbrook, which will work to identify buildings and landmarks with historical significance and determine what additional protections they need.

Cllr Swindlehurst said: “I have always said the publication of the consultation was the start of a process, and that Slough would use its relationship with Heathrow to fight for the interests of our communities.

“Our support for expansion has never been in question. But as elected decision makers we will always work to ensure our communities are protected.”

Cllr Dexter Smith (Con, Colnbrook with Poyle) said: “The Historic Area Assessments are supposed to be done by the council every ten years – and the last was in 1997. It’s ten years out of date, so I welcome that.

“I’m glad there has been some movement, but this is not a fundamental change in position.”

http://www.sloughobserver.co.uk/news/16174171.Negotiations_underway_to_prevent_Heathrow_intrusion/

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See earlier:

 

Heathrow third runway: Slough council criticises revised plans

20 March 2018Pippins SchoolImage copyrightGOOGLE

Image captionPippins School could be demolished because of “worsening noise and air pollution”.

 

A school, homes and businesses will have to be demolished under revised plans for a new runway at Heathrow, a council has revealed.

Slough Borough Council said Pippins School in Colnbrook would be closer to the runway than previously thought.

It claims changes to the M25 will also affect a local trading estate, and lead to increased congestion and pollution.

Heathrow told the BBC it will continue to “explore options” to mitigate the impact on affected facilities.

A spokesperson said the airport is almost at the end of a 10-week consultation period but “there are currently no plans to compulsory purchase Pippins School”.

They added: “We will continue to work with all community facilities close to the new boundary – including schools – to explore options for mitigating the impacts of Heathrow expansion. This will include options including a world class noise insulation package and commitments around air quality.”

Slough Borough Council, which is supportive of development and a new runway, have criticised plans in the airport’s initial consultation.

It claims that raising the runway above ground level as it crosses the M25 could have “serious impacts” on Pippins School and nearby homes because of “worsening noise and air pollution”.

The authority added in a statement that, having inspected the plans, the school and nearby houses would be likely to be part of a compulsory purchase order.

Dialogue with Heathrow was therefore needed, it claimed, to rebuild the school at another, more suitable, location.

The leader of Slough council, James Swindlehurst, said they were objecting to the wider proposals in the hope of “shaping the ideas” Heathrow were producing.

Diverting the M25 by 150 metres to the west, he claimed, could involve the loss of homes at Elbow Meadow and buildings on the Galleymead Trading Estate in Colnbrook.

He told BBC Berkshire: “At the moment, the road hugs the M25, and the M25 hugs the airport, and we want to keep it like that”.

A Public Safety Zone, which protects people against an aircraft accident on take-off or landing, would also extend over, and “seriously blight”, houses in nearby Brands Hill, the council said.

Pippins School said it would not comment until they have discussed the proposals with Heathrow.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-43469213

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See earlier

Slough invites comment on its air pollution strategy – but gagging agreement prevents much mention of Heathrow …

Slough residents are being asked for their views on the draft Slough Low Emission Strategy (LES). Slough has high levels of air pollution that affect the health of residents. While several factors contribute to the borough’s air quality, the emissions from road transport vehicles are the most significant source – and much of this traffic is Heathrow-related. The strategy says it “recognises the challenges and opportunities that may arise from the construction of a 3rd runway at Heathrow.” The Slough council draft LES supports its new transport strategy and forms part of the Slough Air Quality Action Plan (AQAP). It lays out an integrated, year on year plan to improve air quality up to 2025, “reducing vehicle emissions by accelerating the uptake of cleaner fuels and technologies.”  The Slough Cabinet member for environment and leisure, said: “The health and wellbeing of our residents and the people who visit and work in Slough is paramount ….”  The strategy says it will “Link and compliment with a potential Ultra-Low Emission Zone at Heathrow.” Slough signed an agreement with Heathrow in mid 2015, to get benefits from a runway, provided they always back the runway. “1.5  Slough Council’s Cabinet commits to publicly support the expansion of Heathrow Airport with immediate effect and until Heathrow is granted the DCO. ” The council does not dare to complain!

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2017/11/slough-invites-comment-on-its-air-pollution-strategy-but-gagging-order-prevents-much-mention-of-heathrow/

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Slough Council secret deal with Heathrow includes gagging order, making it impotent in fighting for a better deal from Heathrow for 3 – 4 years

Residents of Colnbrook, close to Heathrow and due to be badly affected by a 3rd runway, submitted a FoI request to get the details for the secret, but legally binding, deal done between Slough Borough Council and Heathrow airport. The details of the deal are worrying. As well as finding out that Colnbrook, and help for the residents, do not feature in the deal, it has emerged that  Slough Council has accepted what amounts to a self-imposed gagging order, unable to criticise Heathrow for the next 3 to 4 years,until Heathrow is granted a Development Consent Order (DCO).  As well as a boost for investment in the town and improved access from central Slough to the airport, the secret agreement sees Heathrow commit to supporting the Council’s representations to Government to seek compensation for lost business rates, put by the council itself at up to £10 million earlier this year.  In return, however, Cabinet is legally bound to giving public support for the airport until final permission, is granted.  A Development Consent Order is at least three years away, possibly four.  Residents expected that their council would have argued for “world class” compensation and mitigation.  

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