National Trust claims Gatwick expansion would harm Wakehurst Place – and other historic properties

Wakehurst Place is a beautiful stately home in Sussex, owned by the National Trust. It is the country part of Kew Gardens botanical garden, with the world’s largest seed conservation project.  The wonderful old house has been used in many films.  It is now one of the 13 historic properties that the National Trust says could be affected by a new Gatwick runway. These also include Penshurst Place in Kent, which was used as a location for current BBC Tudor drama “Wolf Hall.”  The National Trust said it was “highly sceptical” about proposed expansions to either Gatwick or Heathrow in its submission to the Airports Commission. The NT believes any airport expansion at either Heathrow or Gatwick would increase noise impact to residents and affect how people spend their leisure time.  It has an impact on visitors to these historic and  unique buildings. It also said it could affect filming possibilities at the venues because of increased aircraft noise.  Hever Castle (former home of Anne Boleyn) is also very badly affected by noise from Gatwick landings, with real fears of reduced visitor numbers, if the amount of aircraft noise prevents the visit being a pleasant and peaceful experience.
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National Trust claims Gatwick expansion would harm Wakehurst Place

8.2.2015

The response by the National Trust to the Airports Commission consutation is here 

National Trust response to Airports Commission


 

A STATELY home used in the latest BBC period blockbluster is among a number of historical sites set to lose out should Gatwick get the go ahead for a second runway, a conservation group has claimed.

The National Trust has listed 13 attractions that could be affected by an expanded Gatwick including Wakehurst Place near Haywards Heath and Penshurst Place in Kent which was used as a location for current BBC hit drama Wolf Hall.

he body said it was “highly sceptical” about proposed expansions to either Gatwick or Heathrow in its submission to the Airports Commission which is currently evaluating the best option to expand the UK’s airport capacity.

The National Trust said any airport expansion at either Heathrow or Gatwick would increase noise impact to residents and affect how people spend their leisure time, according to claims reported in The Sunday Times.

It also said it could affect filming possibilities at the venues because of increased aircraft noise.

A Gatwick spokesman said a new runway would not necessarily increase noise at historic venues such as Hever House in Kent which is on the airport’s flight path and that studies were being carried out at ways of reducing the number of flights going over the former castle of Anne Boleyn.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/11779199.National_Trust_claims_Gatwick_expansion_would_harm_Wakehurst_Place/?ref=rss

Wakehurst place location

Wakehurst Place  – Botanical garden with the world’s largest seed conservation project

Open throughout the year, Wakehurst is the country estate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

The varied landscape is of international significance for its beautiful botanic gardens and tree collections, as well as for its science-based plant conservation and research.

A feast for the senses, Wakehurst features natural woodland and lakes, formal gardens, an Elizabethan house (five unfurnished rooms) and the 21st-century architecture of Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank.

Wakehurst marks an international conservation milestone in 2010, having conserved seeds from ten per cent of the world’s plant species.

Wakehurst Place is leased from the National Trust and is managed by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. More info on their website here.

 

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wakehurst-place/?p=1356311012168

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See also

Gatwick 2nd runway aircraft noise could threaten Hever Castle – it harms the visitor experience

Hever Castle – the childhood home of Anne Boleyn – near Edenbridge in Kent fears increased aircraft noise, from  Gatwick planes,  could deter people from visiting the attraction. The chief executive of Hever, Duncan Leslie, said: “If they increased aeroplanes I would be surprised if this business survived long term.”  The noise is already bad, though Gatwick is 21 miles away, and a 2nd runway  could make the situation worse. Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII’s second wife, lived at Hever, which dates back to 1270.  The relentless aircraft noise, with planes some  3 – 4,000 feet overhead,  detracts from the experience of Hever, and for much of the day with a westerly wind, there is a plane about once a minute. Alastair McDermid, Gatwick’s airports commission director, said a new runway would be to the south of the existing one and would not necessarily increase noise at Hever. Gatwick is holding a consultation at present, and has done 16 exhibitions about it. However, they have chosen not to give any details on flight paths, which has caused a lot of annoyance.

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2014/05/gatwick-2nd-runway-aircraft-noise-could-threaten-hever-castle-it-harms-the-visitor-experience/

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And

2nd Gatwick runway could ‘spell the end’ for Hever Castle as a tourist attraction due to the relentless aircraft noise

17.9.2013

A 2nd runway at Gatwick could “spell the end” for one of the area’s top tourist attractions, Hever Castle, which was the home of Anne Boleyn. The castle’s chief executive Duncan Leslie fears the increase in planes overhead could ruin the historic castle and gardens, due to the relentless, almost non-stop noise. To make the situation still worse, planes enter the airport’s ILS landing system close to Hever, and tend to come up into it from below, with extra engine  noise, especially if simultaneously making a turn.  Duncan Leslie explained that when visitors come to rural attractions they are expecting a degree of peace and tranquillity. However, with the flight path for Gatwick – just some 13 miles away – over the castle and its grounds, visitors are being deterred. Already putting on outdoor theatre is almost impossible, as the plays are interrupted every couple of minutes. A group of Chinese tour operators visiting Hever had said they were astonished that the Government allowed aircraft to fly low over Hever. A high proportion of Hever’s visitors are from overseas. Mr Leslie said: “If our internationally popular tourist attractions become noise ghettoes, it does not matter how big the airports are, we will not get more tourists coming here.”  Mr Leslie has asked his local council, Sevenoaks, to oppose Gatwick’s plans for a 2nd runway.
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http://www.sevenoakschronicle.co.uk/Gatwick-runway-spell-end-Hever-Castle-tourism/story-19806450-detail/story.html

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