Gatwick produces Final Action Plan to implement Independent Review of Arrivals recommendations

On 31st March Gatwick, made its initial response to the Arrivals Review, carried out by Bo Redeborn and Graham Lake.  Gatwick then had to hold la 6 week consultation on the Proposed Action Plan, which ended on the 16th May. Gatwick has now produced its Final Action Plan. It confirms it has accepted all the Review’s recommendations. As well as accelerating the retrofitting of Airbus A320 planes to remove the “whine”, two issues in the Review that generated the most public input were widening the “swathe” for arriving planes as the join the ILS to 8 – 14 nautical miles, and the setting up of a Gatwick Noise Management Board (NMB), on which a few community representatives can sit.  Gatwick says the NMB will “oversee joint strategies to deal with noise around the airport.”  It will be chaired by Bo Redeborn, and its first meeting will be on 21st June.  In response to extensive feedback, community representation on the NMB has been increased from two representatives to four, and further analysis has been carried out to quantify more fully the impact of widening the arrivals swathe. There remain concerns by those living near the airport that some people will suffer from noise of both arrivals and departures, and Gatwick has produced maps to illustrate that it anticipates this will not be a problem for a large area.
.

 

See also

Gatwick provides more details of the setting up of the Noise Management Board, from the Arrivals Review

Gatwick provides more details of the wider swathe of arrivals onto the ILS, from the Arrivals Review



Gatwick produces Final Action Plan to implement Independent Review of Arrivals

02/06/2016

  • Airport has accepted all of the recommendations of the Independent Arrivals Review
  • Noise Management Board to have its first meeting in June
  • Gatwick grateful for constructive community feedback and engagement

Gatwick Airport has produced a Final Action Plan in response to the recommendations of the Independent Arrivals Review which was commissioned to help address the issue of aircraft noise for local residents.

The Final Action Plan follows a constructive and generally positive period of community engagement to the Proposed Action Plan which ran from 31st March to 16th May 2016 and sought input from a wide range of stakeholders.

The Independent Arrivals Review, commissioned by Gatwick Airport Chairman Sir Roy McNulty, was led by Bo Redeborn and Graham Lake and proposed a timeframe for the introduction of its recommendations, many of which could be operational within a twelve month period, including:

  • improved use of continuous descent arrivals generating significantly less noise and increased flexibility for sequencing and spacing of arrivals
  • accelerated aerodynamic modification for the Airbus A320 family of aircraft to reduce the noise they produce during the approach phase of flight
  • broadening the approach “arrivals swathe” to extend between 8-14nm
  • reduced aircraft holding over land
  • development of a comprehensive online complaint management system, and;
  • the establishment of a Noise Management Board (NMB) to oversee joint strategies to deal with noise around the airport.

Feedback and engagement has confirmed that the community response to the Arrivals Review and the Proposed Action Plan has been largely positive.

In response to that feedback, community representation on the Noise Management Board has been increased from two representatives to four, and further analysis has been carried out to quantify more fully the impact of some recommendations such as the widening of the arrivals swathe to between 8-14nm.

An initial planning meeting for the NMB has already taken place. The NMB is intended to include representatives from Gatwick Airport, the CAA, NATS, ANS, DfT, elected council members and community representatives, with Bo Redeborn being proposed as the Independent Chair. The first meeting of the NMB is planned to take place on 21st June.

Feedback from the local community also indicted strong support for the acceleration of aerodynamic modifications to the Airbus A320 family of aircraft to reduce the noise they produce during the approach phase of flight.

Gatwick Airport Chairman Sir Roy McNulty said:

“I am grateful for the constructive feedback to Gatwick’s Proposed Action Plan from the local community which has helped to ensure the Final Action Plan is designed to meet the needs of local people affected by aircraft noise.

Taken together, the practical steps recommended by Bo and his review team can make a real difference for local people, which is reflected in the positive community response to the review. Gatwick is now committed to working with the local community, the new Independent Noise Management Board and other partners to implement the recommendations of the review.”

Bo Redeborn said:

“The review team is pleased that the review’s recommendations have been accepted and that work is already underway to implement many of the 23 recommendations.

Ultimately, these recommendations are about reducing the impact of noise on local people, and the ongoing input of community groups and representatives has played a significant role in shaping the review’s recommendations and Gatwick’s Final Action Plan.”

.

Notes for Editors

The Final Action Plan can be found here.

The full Independent Review of Arrivals report can be found here.

Bo Redeborn brings extensive experience and understanding of air traffic control having previously served as Principal Director of Air Traffic Management for EUROCONTROL. Amongst other current activities, Bo is currently an independent member of Gatwick’s Environment, Health and Safety, and Operational Resilience Committee. From 2011-2014 he was Principal Director Air Traffic Management in EUROCONTROL and, before joining EUROCONTROL in 2004 as Director ATM Strategies, he was Manager Air Traffic Management and later Manager ATM Support and Development in the Swedish CAA (LFV).

The review was commissioned in August 2015 to determine whether;

“1.  Everything that can reasonably be done to alleviate the problems which local communities are raising is in fact being done, whether this involves action by the airport or by other parties most closely involved – National Air Traffic Services (NATS), UK Civil Aviation Authority (UKCAA), the Department for Transport (DfT) or the airlines, and

“2.  The mechanisms which Gatwick has adopted for providing information to the local community and for handling of complaints have been fully adequate for the task.”

http://www.mediacentre.gatwickairport.com/press-releases/2016/16-06-02-arrivals-review-final-action-plan.aspx

.


.

The “Overview and Final Action Plan”

The Gatwick “Overview and Final Action Plan” says three of the proposals generated the most responses.  One was the fitting of the Airbus A320 series with small devices to stop the hated “Airbus Whine”. The other two were the widening of the arrivals swathe, and the formation of a Noise Management Board.

Imm-10 – widening of swathe

This recommendation is regarding the wider arrivals swathe. As outlined on page 32 of this document, the vast majority of respondents support this approach.

Imm-18 Noise Management Board

Imm-18 proposed the coordinated consideration and oversight of possible implementation of all of the recommendations will be the responsibility of the proposed Noise Management Board. During the engagement period, a template email was issued by a campaign group, nominating a different Board composition (2 Parish Councillors instead of 2 County Councillors) and specific members to the NMB roles. GAL received 361 responses in this format, with a small number of variations regarding the individuals represented to the Board. Whilst this is not the process by which the Board representatives will be determined, nevertheless, it has indicated that special consideration must be taken when pressing forward with Board appointments.


On RECOMMENDATION Imm-10    (Pages 22 – 32)

“That GAL explores with NATS the potential for aircraft to be vectored to be established on the ILS at a minimum of 8nm from touchdown outside of night hours, rather than the current 10nm. This adaptation to vectoring methodology will extend the arrival swathe 2nm further to the west for Runway 26, and east for Runway 08, and will increase the arrivals dispersal to more closely emulate the circumstances prior to 2013 change. Hence the arrival swathe would normally extend from a minimum of 8nm to 14nm, with aircraft joining on a straight in approach when traffic permits”.

In their Final report, Gatwick says:

Accept/Reject

GAL accepts this recommendation. Following coordination with airlines, NATS, ANS and the CAA, further analysis and quantification of this proposed change and the expected consequences are now much more fully understood. GAL has been able to confirm that the proposal to widen the arrivals swathe will create a fairer and more equitable distribution of aircraft noise, more closely emulating that experienced by communities prior to 2013. As a part of the implementation process, new monitoring procedures will be developed to quantify the extent and volume of actual flight distribution for regular review by the NMB.

While in the initial response from Gatwick to the Arrivals Review, on 31st March, Gatwick said: 

“GAL is minded to accept this recommendation. But its implementation is a complex matter and GAL will therefore seek to ensure that its impact is fully understood before a final decision is taken. Implementation is a matter for NATS, so GAL will also seek confirmation from NATS as to when the recommendation can be implemented, as intended by the authors of the Report.”

.


On RECOMMENDATION Imm-18    (See Pages 40 – 43)

“The establishment of a Noise Management Board (NMB) by summer 2016, to be operated under independent Chairmanship and comprising representatives from each of the institutions able to effect change for Gatwick arrivals, as well as the chair of the Airport Consultative Committee (GATCOM), and both elected council members and residents’ representatives”.

“Accept/Reject This recommendation is accepted.”

In their final report, Gatwick says:

Implementation Plan

1. Following analysis of feedback from many respondents, a planning meeting was held on 18th May 2016 for invited participants to discuss NMB membership and develop a final draft Terms of Reference for consideration and adoption by the NMB at its meeting on 21st June 2016. The Annex following contains the final draft Terms of Reference agreed at the planning meeting, and the attendance list for that meeting.

2. Participants at the NMB planning meeting welcomed an increase to the community group representation to four NMB seats, and agreed that these should reflect a rural, urban, departure and arrival representation. Community Groups at the meeting agreed to develop a consensus on how the increased representation on the NMB will be utilised and to inform the chair by 14th June. If no consensus is forthcoming, an interim solution will be used until a permanent representation can be jointly agreed.

3. Hold the first NMB meeting on 21st June 2016.

Responsibility: GAL

Complete: June 2016

 

While in the initial response from Gatwick to the Arrivals Review on 31st March 2016 Gatwick said: 

Implementation Plan

1. Continue dialogue with NATS, CAA, DfT, airlines and community stakeholders seeking suggestions for NMB Membership, Terms of Reference, Independent Chair and Frequency of Meetings.

2. A planning meeting is proposed on 18th May 2016 for invited participants to discuss NMB membership and terms of reference. Responsibility: GAL Complete: May 2016

3. Finalise the above in the light of stakeholder feedback, publish the agreed outcome with the aim of holding the first NMB meeting on 21st June 2016..

Responsibility: GAL

Complete: June 2016



Earlier:

 

Gatwick publishes its response to the Arrivals Review – accepting all 23 recommendations

At the end of January, an Independent Arrivals Review was completed by Bo Redeborn. Gatwick was required to publish details comments on this, by 31st March, which they have done. Gatwick says it accepts all the 23 recommendations, though under some of the recommendations there is a long Benefits/Issues section, with various caveats. Some of the recommendations were relatively uncontroversial. Perhaps the most controversial was Recommendation 10, “for aircraft to be vectored to be established on the ILS at a minimum of 8nm (nautical miles)from touchdown outside of night hours, rather than the current 10nm.” Also that “the arrival swathe would normally extend from a minimum of 8nm to 14nm, with aircraft joining on a straight in approach when traffic permits.” This would mean less noise for some areas but perhaps more for those living around 8nm from the runway. Gatwick says: “GAL is minded to accept this recommendation. But its implementation is a complex matter and GAL will therefore seek to ensure that its impact is fully understood before a final decision is taken.” Gatwick agrees to improve its dreadful complaints system, and set up in Independent Noise Monitoring Board, though this would probably include only 2 community and 2 local council representatives. There will now be a 6 week public consultation until 16th May.  

http://www.airportwatch.org.uk/2016/03/gatwick-publishes-its-response-to-the-arrivals-review-accepting-all-23-recommendations/

.


Gatwick provides more details of the setting up of the Noise Management Board, from the Arrivals Review

One of the recommendations of the Arrivals Review was that Gatwick should set up a Noise Management Board (NMB), on which community representatives could sit. Gatwick, in its Final Action Plan on the Arrivals Review, has now set out details of how the NMB will work. It will have no more than 14 members; 5 will be institutions; there will be 2 places for County Councils. There will be 4 places for District, Borough, Town and Parish Councils, and Community Noise Groups, with two from the east and two from the west of Gatwick. Gatwick says the NMB: “should be a body with real influence over operational stakeholders around the airport ….” Nothing says it will have any powers or any real influence. Gatwick says it will: “seek to positively influence the noise environment of stakeholders by assisting the development of consensus among the various organisations represented through its membership” [whatever that means in practice?]. The NMB will: “seek to facilitate better understanding by residents through more consistent communication and verifiable data.” Nothing in the stated objectives says noise will reduce, or that the interests of communities will be given equal weight to those of airlines etc. If the NMB cannot reach consensus on a matter, it can be agreed by 75%. The community groups only make up 25% or less.

Click here to view full story…

Gatwick provides more details of the wider swathe of arrivals onto the ILS, from the Arrivals Review

The main reason why Gatwick had to set up the Independent Arrivals Review was the fury and anguish, largely from areas around 10 – 14 miles from the airport, due to changes in 2013 to the distance at which planes joined the ILS (the final straight line flight path onto the runway). NATS and Gatwick had decided, allegedly for safety but in practice to make maximum use of the runway at busy times, to get most planes to join the ILS at 10 nautical miles out, while before that, some joined as close as 7 nm. The concentrated noise over some areas, not previously over-flown, caused unprecedented opposition. The Arrivals Review recommended that the swathe, both east and west of Gatwick, be widened to 8 – 14 nm, and that there should be more fair and equitable distribution of the noise of planes joining the ILS. A large part of the “Final Action Plan” deals with this. It attempts to allay fears that, to save fuel, many planes will try to cut a corner, and concentrate around the 8nm area. It tries to allay fears that there will be concentrated parts of the routes, and that people living relatively near Gatwick – (around 7 – 9nm or so) will suffer unduly from noise of both arrivals and departures. However, Gatwick says it is “not possible to predict precisely the distribution of aircraft within the swathe” and this will be “carefully monitored and reported to the Noise Management Board” which in turn will publish its findings and any conclusions.

Click here to view full story…