The Institute of Directors want government to allow two new runways – not just Heathrow

The Institute of Directors (IOD) are firmly convinced that people should fly more, and so the south east needs more runway capacity.  They appear to be entirely convinced by the publicity Heathrow has put out about the alleged benefits a 3rd runway would bring. But they want more than just one runway. The IODs wants the government, after the 8th June election, to build two more runways, and a follow-up Airports Commission be established. They want a fast-track commission be set up immediately to recommend locations for two additional runways within a year. Plans for a 3rd Heathrow runway need the draft National Policy Statement to be voted through parliament, perhaps early in 2018 and then several years of planning process. At the earliest the runway might be in use some time after 2025. Numbers of air passengers are rising quickly, as flying is so cheap and the moderately affluent in the UK get richer. The London Chamber of Commerce and Industry has also called for the next government to enable a 2nd runway at Gatwick to help create a “megacity”. While Gatwick was shortlisted as a candidate for a new runway by the Airports Commission, other airports such as Stansted and Birmingham would be likely to push hard should a future opportunity emerge.
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Business leaders want next government to build two more runways

‘Years of dawdling’ on airport capacity have left us lagging behind rest of Europe, say Institute of Directors. 

The Institute of Directors said the commission had underestimated demand for air travel and said Gatwick would be full before Heathrow was enlarged.
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By   Transport correspondent (Guardian)

Business leaders have called for the next government to build two more runways, demanding that a follow-up Airports Commission be established only months after Heathrow’s third runway was approved.

The IoD, which represents 30,000 UK company directors, said that the commission had underestimated demand for air travel and said Gatwick would also be full before Heathrow, Britain’s main hub airport, was enlarged. Almost 45 million passengers travelled through Gatwick in the last year, a 9% increase.

Dan Lewis, senior infrastructure adviser at the Institute of Directors, said: “The growth in passenger numbers is far ahead of what the Airports Commission said it would be. This is a fast-moving target.

“Whoever wins the next election, they will face a serious challenge in upgrading the UK’s transport and communications network. The years of dawdling on new airport capacity have left us lagging well behind European competitors. Expanding Heathrow is not enough.”

Plans for a third Heathrow runway were cancelled by the coalition in 2010, before renewed pressure from business groups, the aviation industry and backbench MPs pushed the prime minister to reopen the issue of airport expansion. Sir Howard Davies’ commission said only one runway could be built before 2030 within Britain’s climate change obligations.

The London Chamber of Commerce and Industry has also called for the next government to enable a second runway at Gatwick to help create a “megacity”. While Gatwick was shortlisted as a candidate for a new runway, other airports such as Stansted and Birmingham would be likely to push hard should a future opportunity emerge.

A Heathrow spokesperson said: “We’re getting on with expanding Britain’s only hub airport – with the new runway on track to open in 2025, doubling cargo capacity and adding 50% more flights. Heathrow continues to support the growth of aviation capacity in the UK in line with strict environmental targets.”

John Stewart, chair of anti-Heathrow expansion group Hacan, said the IoD was “living in a fantasy world”. He added: “Because of the opposition, it takes years to build one runway. To try to build three at a time would create a nationwide network of opposition from local resident groups and climate change activists, the likes of which the UK has not seen before.”

The IoD also urged a roadmap for building Crossrail 2, the north-south rail line that Transport for London has insisted will be crucial to meet the needs of the capital, particularly once HS2 is operational.

Although it was identified by the National Infrastructure Commission as the single most important project for development, the preferred route has yet to be published by the transport secretary, Chris Grayling, and political impetus for the rail line appears to have diminished. Lewis said: “Since Theresa May took over, it’s back-pedalled a bit. Certainly there’s a sensitivity about it looking like a London project – but you can’t ignore the national importance.”

In a manifesto paper, the business group said that the government should also prioritise ultrafast broadband and 4G coverage. Lewis said: “Ultrafast broadband could mean a rural economy renaissance, it could drive growth and make places with low land values good economic prospects.” The IoD said that there should be a commitment to switching from copper to fibre networks by 2025.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/15/business-leaders-want-next-government-build-two-more-runways?CMP=share_btn_tw

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Business leaders call for new airports commission to pick two more runways

15.5.2017 (IoD press release)

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Immediately after the election, the next government must launch a follow-up Airports Commission to recommend locations for two new runways, the Institute of Directors urged today. With Heathrow’s third runway not scheduled to be completed until 2028, and with Gatwick also filling up fast, the business group, which represents 30,000 UK company directors, said that the Commission should only be given a year to report its findings.

The call for extra airport capacity comes in the latest instalment in a series of manifesto papers, collectively titled Let’s Push Things Forward, in which the IoD lays out businesses’ priorities for making the UK more economically competitive. The decision to build a third runway at Heathrow took much longer than companies wanted, but was finally achieved after the choice on location was handed to an independent commission led by Sir Howard Davies. The IoD is calling for a similar process, on an accelerated timescale.

Also in the paper, the IoD calls on the next Government to:

  • Drive forward ultrafast broadband and 4G coverage, replacing the Universal Service Obligation with a much more ambitious target The Government must set a target to ‘switch-off’ the copper network by 2025 and reduce access costs to existing physical infrastructure to everyone has access to the greater speeds of fibre optic cable
  • Engage and consult on longer-term projects Regional growth means investing in infrastructure, often by bringing out-of-date existing networks into the 21st century. Larger projects, like the proposed ‘HS3’, should be consulted upon to ensure that their design delivers most efficiently and cost-effectively
  • Outline a roadmap towards the building of Crossrail 2 Recognising that there are resource limitations to the building of new infrastructure, the Government should put together a plan for progressing with Crossrail 2
  • Establish an infrastructure Best Value Index It is essential to start scoring pipeline projects against each other to identify the best return on investment when resources are scarce
  • Build a database on UK roads covering traffic, accidents, costs and air pollution Roads are the hardest-working muscles in the UK’s transport infrastructure but we know too little about them. The more information we have about them, the more efficient our investment can be
  • Bring in speed targets for buses and repurpose roads to better suit space-friendly buses Buses might not be the most glamorous form of transport, but they are a crucial part of our transport network and we need to ensure they are moving as efficiently as possible

Dan Lewis, Senior Infrastructure Adviser at the Institute of Directors said:

“Whoever wins the next election, they will face a serious challenge in upgrading the UK’s transport and communications network. The years of dawdling on new airport capacity have left us lagging well behind European competitors. Expanding Heathrow is not enough, we need two further runways at South East airports and better connections to the ones where there is spare capacity, particularly Stansted.

“Broadband must also be a priority for the general election winner, as better, faster connections would not only make businesses more productive, it would also help them to offer staff more flexible working. At the moment the UK is being held back by its out-of-date network of copper wires. The next government has to commit to a step-change in internet speeds by completing the switch to fibre by 2025.”

https://www.iod.com/news-campaigns/news/articles/Business-leaders-call-for-new-airports-commission-to-pick-two-more-runways

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LONDON CHAMBER SETS OUT ITS MANIFESTO PRIORITIES FOR BREXIT AND MEGACITY LONDON
. Thursday 11 May 2017


Media Contact
Katharine McGee
T: +44 (0)20 7203 1897
M: +44 (0)7827 241528
E: kmcgee@londonchamber.co.uk

London Chamber sets out its manifesto priorities for Brexit and ‘megacity’ London

London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) has today published its London Business Manifesto “Capital Matters” setting out its key asks for the next Government to ensure that London continues to maintain its status as a globally competitive city.

LCCI believes it is vital that as the next Government negotiates the exit from the EU it prioritises the London workforce, both current and future and commits to long and short term infrastructure investment.

This includes guaranteeing the status of EU nationals, committing to major infrastructure projects such as Crossrail 2, introducing a new “T Level” in construction and digital skills and fundamentally reviewing business rates.

Chief Executive of LCCI, Colin Stanbridge said: “London’s success cannot be taken for granted. Alongside rising cost pressures for many London businesses, the city’s growing population is putting the capital’s critical economic infrastructure under unprecedented pressure.

“Maintaining the capital’s competitiveness now and into the future will require a Brexit that works for London’s businesses, large and small.  But most important as negotiations with our European partners get underway will be bold steps to tackle the capital’s urgent, current domestic priorities.

“Steps must be taken during the next parliament to strengthen the capital’s economic foundations and, by doing so, its ability to thrive in a post-Brexit world.”

LCCI has compiled Capital Matters as a result of recent polling and research on numerous issues affecting businesses of all sizes across the capital.

As a result of these results and feedback from member, LCCI is calling for the next Government to limit uncertainty and maximize opportunity by making four key commitments. These are to:

Deliver a Brexit that works for London by:

  • Securing a realistic transitional period for Brexit to enable businesses to adjust to new circumstances and prioritise minimising costly tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade.
  • Granting indefinite leave to remain for existing EU national employees within the capital to reassure them and their employers.
  • Establishing a separate ‘Shortage Occupation List’ for London (like Scotland has) and create a ‘Capital Work Permits’ system to meet employers’ future labour needs.
  • Prioritising the preservation of aviation and maritime arrangements with the EU to secure swift market access and maintain London’s status as a global hub.

Provide Infrastructure to underpin a ‘megacity’ by:

  • Securing Parliamentary time for a hybrid bill to designate Crossrail 2 as major infrastructure of national importance and commence development works
  • Auditing and mapping disused or poor quality land within the Metropolitan green belt to identify ‘brownspace’ plots of land where small developers can bring forward new housing.
  • Boosting short-term airport capacity through airfield, terminal and rail-link enhancements and future-proof the UK economy by enabling a new runway at Gatwick, after Heathrow. 
  • Permitting Transport for London (TfL) to seek responsibility for commuter rail services into London as each mainline franchise comes up for renewal

……….. and it continues at length ……

http://www.londonchamber.co.uk/lcc_public/article.asp?id=0&did=47&aid=8375&st=&oaid=-1

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